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Papaya hot dogs...no longer 50 cents?

Has anyone else noticed this travesty?

Papaya King
Sunday, March 30, 2003

I'm calling my congressman.

Charles Lewis
Wednesday, April 02, 2003

Historically they tend to adjust their prices dramatically based on the state of the economy... I get the feeling from all their signs that the owner is quite socially progressive and that their principle is to break even during recessions and make their profits when the economy is good.

Joel Spolsky
Wednesday, April 02, 2003

Do the Papaya people know something I don't about the state of the economy?

Shouldn't hot dogs be about $0.20 by now?

Corey Henderson
Wednesday, April 02, 2003

Hmm.  Sounds like we might be able to start a new index to gauge the state of the economy.  We already have the "Big Mac" index.  How about the "Papaya" index.  Those boys on Wall street will use any piece of info to justify their positions.

I read somewhere that the cost of a slice of pizza is closely linked to the cost of a subway token.  I guess we'll be seeing $2 slices as a standard soon.

Best food bargain in NYC: Mamoon's on MacDougal.  $2 for the best falafel in town.

Papaya King
Monday, April 07, 2003

Sure, any indicator you can get can help in the decision making process....

As a kid I noticed comic books, pizza & subway tokens (though as a kid I only took the bus) moved closely until Comic Books shot up to $3 a piece.

Though pizza in the city and pizza on the outskirts of brooklyn are two different things.

I just wrote an essay about decision making on my website, so it's funny you should mention that whole macdonalds/wall street thing.

Just last night I was talking about how MacDonalds is used to measure the economic prospects of developing nations - if MacDonalds moves in, that's a very good sign. Is that what you're talking about, or is there another Big Mac indicator I don't know about?

www.marktaw.com
Monday, April 07, 2003

I think the "Big Mac" index is more of a measure of purchasing power.

http://www.oanda.com/products/bigmac/bigmac.shtml

As far as the comic book industry.  I became disgusted by their greed during the 90's.  With the all the #1 re-issues and sorry storylines, I gave up on them.  Probably a good thing.  Nothing a woman finds more attractive than a grown man with comic books.

Excuse me while I go out and shovel snow for the umpteenth time this year...

Papaya King
Monday, April 07, 2003

LOLOLOLOLOL

NY1 just did a spot on the Papaya King chain!  Fodors gave them (out of 30) a 25 for price and a 3 for atmosphere.  Said one patron "Don't look at the floor."

Charles

Charles Lewis
Thursday, April 17, 2003

papaya blows compared to crif dog -113 st marks place (btwn 1st and A)  try the deep fried bacon wrapped dog with avacado and sour cream-  holy crap thats good

TDC
Thursday, April 24, 2003

The Big Mac index was invented by The Economist.

It is a half-joke, half-serious indicator on the value of a country's currency. The idea is that a a dollar should buy the same amount in all countries. It is about purchasing power parity.

So, a simple bottle of milk should cost the same in two countries once you have done an exchange rate conversion. Of course, they don't. The Big Mac is so powerful as a comparative basket because so many different types of economic cost go into it: land, labour, basic foodstuffs etc.

It tells us that Australia's currency is very undervalued (although it has spiked over the last year or so, as the "new economy" economies have taken a tumble: Australia relies very heavily on "old economy", which was bad a year or two ago, but now old is good).

Patrick FitzGerald
Thursday, May 08, 2003

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