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Music, mp3's, etc.

Who woulda thought that something like the iPod would be so popular?  Certainly not me.  I rip CDs - which I buy mostly at Half Price Books, since most of the music I like is being recycled - and keep copies on my laptop and work PC.

So now Microsoft is looking to enter the iPod game with their own version.  What do you think?  Another success story?  If so, why?  If not, why?

Why did portable music become so big?  I mean, whoopee.  I don't quite get it.

hoser
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Portable music is all about convenience - pure and simple.

Not sure about MS entering the game but you can be they'll throw tons of money at it (like that have done with the X-Box which hasn't exactly been a runaway commercial success).

I guess the good thing about them entering the game is lower prices for the consumer because of competition.

TheGeezer
Thursday, September 02, 2004

>>but you can be they'll throw

D'oh - that should read "you can BET they'll throw..."

TheGeezer
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Yeah, but knowing Microsoft, they'll go overkill and try and make it an all in one media machine. By adding video support, wireless internet support, and a nice massage feature, they'll create a product that's expensive, poor on power management, and suited only for a select few tech heads who must have the latest and greatest...That's just my prediction.

SW
Thursday, September 02, 2004

I already said it in this forum.

MP3 players are the universe's way of balancing itself.

The 28 albums you would've bought if you didn't download them now cost you $400 to listen to.

www.MarkTAW.com
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Mark,

that is one of the best lines I have heard. Maybe we can sell the record companies on that:-)

Prakash S
Thursday, September 02, 2004

A portable MP3 player that doles out massages will sell like gangbusters!! For a while there I was wondering whatever happened to innovation in these sorts of devices...  :-)

TheGeezer
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Portable music has been big since, well, the dayss of the transistor radio. Then the "walkman" type players, then the portable CD players. The all electronic version is just the next wave.


Thursday, September 02, 2004

Since mobile phones are offering increased storage, media cards, bluetooth and wireless conections I can't see there being a need for stand alone mp3 players in the next few years.

Ben
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Yeah, there will be hybrid devices, but just like some people still buy hi-fi separates some people will still buy separate music players, cameras and phones.

Tom (a programmer)
Thursday, September 02, 2004

"Why did portable music become so big?  I mean, whoopee.  I don't quite get it."

Where have you been since 1979?!

Sony Walkman
Thursday, September 02, 2004

I think any mp3 player's success now will be based mostly on the service that it is marketed with.

Sure, some trendy 'style' brands will have a niche... But the broadest success will come from superior services.

It seems to me that the RIAA's terrorism is working at least to some degree. Any player is worthless without good mp3's to go on it. More and more, if people can avoid the risk of any RIAA extortion or hassle, they will.

I am Jack's lack of a witty reference
Thursday, September 02, 2004

I've never owned a walkman.  Hmm.  Never saw the point.

To be sure, when I'm outside, I want to hear what's outside.  Even if its traffic and noise.  The only time I listen to music is at work, or working at home.

hoser
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Well, the addictiveness of music varies in people. (Same with brown bubbly sugarwater.) Consider the iPod a portable IV drip for a drug. Portable music has a huge market because it requires no interaction or literacy, and the music industry has exploited celebrity so that it satisfies peoples' needs for stories.

Conspicuous consumption is also an issue. If you have an Apple product, it marks you as someone with good taste who doesn't run with the herd. (Which is kind of true, except for those who do it conspicuously, who are just posers.) Favorite bands are also chosen this way. ("Old Metallica is more to my taste; you know, before they sold out with the black album.")

Tayssir John Gabbour
Thursday, September 02, 2004

"good taste who doesn't run with the herd"

er, more like

different taste who runs with a smaller herd

sgf
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Well, I don't own a mac, and I've only done some dev on them, but it's pretty clear it's a very quality system. No one is doing that kind of innovation. So even though I might not have an enormous reason to use them, I'd probably look well on someone who does. As long as they are being reasonable about it.

Tayssir John Gabbour
Thursday, September 02, 2004

I have a Neuros (http://www.neurosaudio.com/index.aspx) and I love it. I use WinAmp's Internet radio along with Streamripper to save off the MP3s. I can collect several hundred tunes over a weekend. I d/l them all and if I don't like it, I delete it, culling it back it back to what I like. Works great. Eventually the RIAA will pull the plug, I suspect, but until then it's how I get my music, besides ripping CDs which I've purchased.

The Neuros has a feature where I can play tunes through a nearby FM radio. This works pretty well, although I live near DC where there are stations on partically all the channels. I understand in the latest firmware they've boosted the signal strength.

Also, they've released the Neuros software into Sourceforge.  FOSS is a good thing.

Problem with Microsoft's store and player is that it's going to be DRM encrusted. No thanks. I'll stick with my MP3s.

Besides, my general opinion is that if there are two products and one is Microsoft, I'll lean towards the other - especially if it's open source.

DryWell
Friday, September 03, 2004

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