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Fear the power of Shell_NotifyIcon

Quicktime added a gratuitous icon to my tray. Java pops the crappy coffee cup.

Why does everyone need to feel important?

Alex
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Lamery at its finest

hoser
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

The greatest is when you look at someone's computer and they have so much crap installed on it that the tray has about 35 icons in it and spans more than half of their screen width.

Interestingly enough, I've found that the more "cluttered" a person's tray is, the more likely they have viruses/spyware/adware on their machine.


Tuesday, August 31, 2004

ph33r me!!

Shell Notify Icon
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

>> Interestingly enough, I've found that the more "cluttered" a person's tray is, the more likely they have viruses/spyware/adware on their machine.

I've done a little freelance desktop support this year and it's amusing to me how the average person who has all this CRAP on their system simply does not grasp that it drags down the speed and increases the startup time. The average consumer just clicks and installs and clicks YES to every message box like a mindless robot. Then you ask them "how did all this get on there" and they are absolutely clueless.

Bored Bystander
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Acrobat should add one like Java. Once you load it embedded in a browser, the process never goes away and eats 30 Megs of memory.

LDAP is fun!
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Yep, the Acrobat reader is one of the worst polluters out there.

Just me (Sir to you)
Wednesday, September 01, 2004

Wha takes up the memory with acrobat are the add-ons. If you disable them then it loads pretty quick. A while back somebody recommended a little program that would disable them for you.

As for Bored's point, has he ever considered that the reason people click yes to things they don't understand is that they have learnt from experience that if you click no to what you don't understand you don't even get round to installing an operating system.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, September 01, 2004

Granted, it's Pavlovian conditioning. The click through agreements for scumware/crapware are designed to look as staid and righteous as the ones for Microsoft products, upon which they're modeled. So an unwashed end user has no idea if they just clicked Ok to replace their entire Windows OS with an adware simulacrum...

But I mainly blame end users because they *DON'T READ*. They just assume that all verbiage is not meant to be read or understood.

Another phenomenon is the family computer and subteens who are self righteously faux knowledgeable, who have limited shallow knowledge but who rush into crapping up the PC. I've run into systems where many of the core Windows DLLs have been removed and the system rendered unbootable because some kid thought he was outthinking the adware or virus.

Bored Bystander
Wednesday, September 01, 2004

Stephen, I don't care which part takes up the memory, I want that process gone when I close that document.

Just me (Sir to you)
Thursday, September 02, 2004

Dear Justme

Two separate points here - the first is not to load the add-ons in the first place. You are extremely unlikely to need them, and if you do they will load on demand anyway I believe.

The question of programs and processes staying in memory after the process or program has terminated is a thorny one. Many MS programs are famed for this. On the whole it does lead to a better user experience, but I have found, particularly with XP, that the other resources the programs are hogging, handles, user objects and GDIs can cause the machine to become unresponsive.

Another thing I have learnt to do when waiting for a .pdf file to show in the browser is to change Acrobat Readers priority from normal to below normal as it is a CPU hog.

Stephen Jones
Thursday, September 02, 2004

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