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Drawing GUI...

I'm sure this question has been asked many times, but searches in this forum turned up nothing.

I'm looking for a tool (Linux) for quickly roughing out interface layout alternatives. I've used SmartDraw in the past, but I don't have that available here.

Looked at Dia and others, but couldn't find a tool that was easy to use, and included a good library of modern looking gui widgets.

Any ideas?

Edward
Monday, August 30, 2004

Qt Designer/KDE Designer and Glade. All I can think of.

Thom Lawrence
Monday, August 30, 2004

Whiteboard.
Paper.
Paint Program.

Anon
Monday, August 30, 2004

If you're really stretched, you could always come up with a stylesheet that renders HTML widgets in chrome or whatever.

Thom Lawrence
Monday, August 30, 2004

Thanks Thom, I'll have a look at those.

Edward
Monday, August 30, 2004

visio?

Kenny
Monday, August 30, 2004

I guess you're looking for a tool to draw a real-life-looking UI, but if it's just to draw diagrams, you could check out DENIM, "An Informal Tool For Early Stage Web Site and UI Design":

http://guir.berkeley.edu/projects/denim/

Fred
Monday, August 30, 2004

Thanks Fred.

In this case, almost all of the design has been completed. It's more just for generating a few layout alternatives.

Edward
Monday, August 30, 2004

I have tried everything, and while DENIM's pretty good, a whiteboard that prints is the best.

devinmoore.com
Monday, August 30, 2004

After all the time you've spent looking for a tool to draw it, learn how to use it and generate the 'UI', you could have done it properly in whatever platform you're developing in.

Simon Lucy
Monday, August 30, 2004

Not really, in this case, Simon.

Edward
Monday, August 30, 2004

There aren't that many GUI designers for Linux. Appart from "QT Designer" and Borland's Kylix, you could also check out different tools built around wxWidgets which might be good enough if you just want to write mock-ups (http://wxglade.sourceforge.net or http://www.roebling.de/)

Fred
Monday, August 30, 2004

Thanks Fred.

In this particular situation, most of the interface is based around a canvas of sorts. Most of the user's activity is spent doing operations similar to what they might do in a typical drawing package.

For various reasons then, it's been easier to use a drawing package to draw the components, instead of using the limited drawing abilities of a GUI builder.

Edward
Monday, August 30, 2004

REALbasic has not made it to Linux yet. Hbasic or Gambas
look promising:

http://www.devchannel.org/devtoolschannel/04/02/02/1932209.shtml

- then there's TCL/TK (been around since yonks).

trollop
Monday, August 30, 2004

I have this high tech invention on my desk, it's called paper and pencil.

Save some time
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

In every case, Edward.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Ok, I'll revise that.

How do you get from your drawn component to your working component?  Do you have to break it up into bitmaps and then add the behaviour? 

In which case its really no different, depending on the development platform you might be further away from the actual visual aspect of the component than you'd like but sometimes life sucks.

If its pure design then I'd leave it to a graphic designer to produce the look and feel but get it off him/her as fast as possible so I could cut it up into whatever the component/widget really was.

I'm totally against designs being signed off that are just designs that simply don't do anything its worse than prototyping.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Yes, I'd say that is reasonable Simon.

Edward
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

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