Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Rewrite Gecko in Java ?

Many applications require an HTML rendering engine . Unfortunetaly on the Java platform there is not a single rendering engine which support web standards in a decent way (although the situation is improving) . So why isn't there any project which aims to rewrite Gecko in Java ? There is one  project called jazilla ( http://jazilla.mcbridematt.dhs.org/) but the project leader says that he can't be active on it anymore.Any suggestions ? 

browserfan
Monday, August 30, 2004

If you really need Gecko, why don't you call it from your Java app using JNI?

muppet
Monday, August 30, 2004

I think there was one project way back when Netscape was the driving force. I forget its name though.

Matthew Lock
Monday, August 30, 2004

There was Grendel, but it's dead for long.

Ogami Itto
Monday, August 30, 2004

Have a look at jdic (https://jdic.dev.java.net/). It allows you to embeded the a "native" browser into your java application.

"[IT] Provides an AWT component to enable the embedding of the desktop's web browsing component into Java applications and applets. The API supports URL navigation, a basic history mechanism, and progress notification." 

ITECS
Monday, August 30, 2004

"So why isn't there any project which aims to rewrite Gecko in Java"

Most people expect performance in a user app.  User apps in Java are dog slow, for the most part, when compared to a platform-native implementation.

AMS
Monday, August 30, 2004

Quite. If someone suggested I use a browser written in java on the desktop I'd tell 'em where to go. Pretty much all the java desktop apps ive used seem slow and seem to hang a lot, but maybe that's just me

Matt
Monday, August 30, 2004

Incidently, I read that ActiveState's Komodo IDE is based on the Gecko rendering engine.

No wonder I found it slow on a P3 :-)

Fred
Monday, August 30, 2004

One could write a good performance browser in Java these days.  It would require good programming and it would probably take up much more memory than the equivalent browser written in C.  I think the real issue is that there is no money to be made in doing so, and no one capable has started an open source project.  Swing has components to display HTML and if you really need full browser functionality in your app, the JDIC project just makes more sense because your browser is more likely to be kept up to date than some component library.  I think this question is kind of like asking why there isn't a Microsoft Word written in Java.

name withheld out of cowardice
Monday, August 30, 2004

First , Java applications are no longer slow . They used to be slow in the 90s but now some Java apps are faster than native applications . Just look at the benchmarks http://www.kano.net/javabench/ .Second , the reason I think Gecko can be rewritten in Java is that Netscape originally was developing their next generation rendering engine in Java but they changed their minds later and rewrote it in C++.So I think that rewriting Gecko in Java shouldn't be that difficult .

browserfan
Monday, August 30, 2004

"First , Java applications are no longer slow . They used to be slow in the 90s but now some Java apps are faster than native applications . Just look at the benchmarks http://www.kano.net/javabench/ "

Fast for Server JVM, slow for Client JVM. The default is client.

Blah Blah Blah
Monday, August 30, 2004

My personal idea is that desktop Java is no longer slow. I've used UML editors and mp3 players written in Java that were as responsive as their C/C++/Delphi counterparts. On the other hand the memory usage went through the roof.

Ogami Itto
Monday, August 30, 2004

Komodo's sluggish pace is due to python, not gecko.

Gecko is not slow:

http://www.xulplanet.com/ndeakin/article/85/

fool for python
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

If you want to embed a browser in your Java app.  Use SWT, it has a browser control

Gotta Love Eclipse
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

Java apps seem to use as much memory as you let them.  Squeeze down the max memory allowed to the JVM and most apps still run fine.  They get slower in my experience.  I assume the JVM is stealing more CPU time to garbage collect.

Jonathan Briggs
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home