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Building a Wiki

how does one get started?  Where's a good source of documentation and/or source code?

I'm working on a rather extensive personal project, and I've got access to an apache webserver running on (ugh) win32, and I've decided that a Wiki may be the best solution for storing my documentation and reference materials as I generate them.

Step 1 ... ?

muppet
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

profit!

(er, this shouldn't be too hard, moinmoin works pretty well, there's lists of wikis out there, maybe on c2.com or elsewhere)

mb
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

Every "I need a wiki" thread on ask.metafilter.com mentions instiki. I use it. I like it.

alricb
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

1. wiki
2. wacki
3. woo!

pastor of muppets
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

http://www.snipnap.org
http://www.atlassian.com/confluence

AndrewR
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

gaah - that should have been

http://www.snipsnap.org

AndrewR
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

http://www.jspwiki.org

If you are running tomcat, this will install and run right out of the box.  Checkout the plugins too as they can be helpful in extending the wiki with some interesting functions.

It is more wiki looking than snip/snap and easier to navigate and uses a flat file system, so no DB required.  Also, as it is 95% jsp you can alter jspwiki with little effort.

MSHack
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

@muppet: Weren't you building a CMS? Shouldn't you limit yourself to only *one* extracurricular project during "company" time?

anon-y-mous cow-ard
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

Actually this may shock you, but this project is being done all on time where I am physically home.  Shocking, I know.

For the record, I never claimed to be endlessly working on personal projects at work.  I said that when the muse strikes me, I jot down a few function definitions, be it for work projects or home projects, where ever I am.  It was you folks put all the spin doctoring on it.

I'm writing a lengthy manuscript, and I want to keep my notes and reference material in a Wiki for the cross-referencing power I've seen on the public Wikis I've browsed.

muppet
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

Cool down man! I was only pulling your chain!

anon-y-mous cow-ard
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

Heh.  If you had an entire web community jump you/imitate you/mock you for weeks on end due to a difference in opinion, you'd be a bit touchy, too.  ;-)

muppet
Tuesday, August 24, 2004

"a difference in opinion" -- Every 5 minutes!!!

Almost Anonymous
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I use WakkaWiki, just because it's PHP and was the only one I found that didn't say "LOTS OF CONFIGURING!!!"

Once it's installed, it's pretty easy to learn the wiki formatting langauge it's really **not too hard** //honest//.

If you already "get" what a Wiki is, you should be up and running in no time.

www.MarkTAW.com
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

pmwiki in PHP.
Installed in 5 minutes. No DB and you can customize most of it.

http://www.pmwiki.org/wiki/PmWiki/PmWiki

Also see:

http://www.pmwiki.org/wiki/PmWiki/SellingPoints

RedFox
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

My favorite wiki is MoinMoin: http://moin.sourceforge.net/

igrek
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

There are too many Wiki products. There should be one Wiki to rule them all.

And I will write it tonight.

Herr Herr
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

> Step 1 ... ?

You find a girl to love...


Wednesday, August 25, 2004

muppet: "Heh.  If you had an entire web community jump you/imitate you/mock you for weeks on end due to a difference in opinion, you'd be a bit touchy, too.  ;-)"

Quite a few of us have suffered that fate here, over the years.

Nemesis
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Muppet,

The great thing with Wikis is that less is definately more.

Just get you Wiki up and running, which should take no more than half an hour.  If you download one and find theinstallation is difficult, just move on an try another.

Personally I use PHPWiki on Apache and ASPWiki on IIS.  These are both nice and simple.

It is tempting, at first, to apply lots of structure.  This will just get in the way later, so don't to it.  You Aint Gonna Need It, as the XPers say.

First of all just write it all down.  Use the simplest format possible.  I like to start with a log, a different page for each  day where I just keep a journal.

As the information begins to go just start refactorying.  Copy content from the web onto content pages and link.

Avoid imposing structure at the beginning, just let it grow organically.  Later, you can start refactoring.

Ged Byrne
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

@Leonardo: Weren't you building a flying machine? Shouldn't you limit yourself to only *one* extracurricular project during "patronage" time?

Ged Byrne
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I just assumed with a Wiki that you build a page with a large textarea and submit box.  When submitted, use some SQL to update the database.

If this is for a personal project does it need to get any more complicated?

Yoey
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I'll second the vote for Instiki.  Can't get much easier to set up: no configuration, built-in web server.

http://www.instiki.org/

davehal
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I second instiki. 5 minutes to ninstall included making the tea....

regards,

treefrog
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Once I had a girlfriend called Wiki, but too many people touched her.

 
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

So far Instiki is the front runner.  Thanks for all suggestions!!

muppet
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I used QuikiWiki to set up my first wiki. It is not the most full-featured, but _very_ fast to set up.

PHP based. Requires no database.

Rob VH
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I may be retarded, but that 2 step install for instiwiki didn't work for me. Installed ruby, unzipped instiwiki, ran "ruby instiwiki.rb" but localhost doesnt display anything in my web-browser. If that worked, then I'd have to agree that it's easy to install. It appears to be attempting to load and display pages, but it never shows me anything.

tim
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Tim
When I pointed my browser at localhost:2500 I got a whinge about no folder called "storage".  Came out, created one, and lo-and-behold all was well when I restarted it & went back in. 

a cynic writes...
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

gracias, it worked.

tim
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

I also recommend instiki, having just installed it this week. Took three steps:
1. Install Ruby (which I wanted to do anyway)
2. Install Instiki
3. Scratch head momentarily at Instiki startup failure, look at log, realize it couldn't find a subdirectory it needed. Created it. All's well.

The nicest thing was that it has *no* dependencies -- db and Web server are baked right in. Easier than editing httpd.conf for sure.

John C.
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

If you're into Perl I recommend taking a look at CGI::Wiki [1], a toolkit for building wikis. The toolkit is used to build a number of OpenGuides [2], community sites centered around a particular city or subset of a city. I've used it to create a simple site for work in just a couple of hours (with lots of experimentation).

[1] http://search.cpan.org/dist/CGI-Wiki/
[2] http://www.openguides.org/

Chris Winters
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Instiki is freaking beautiful.  Exactly what I needed.  Thank you all.

muppet
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

Shameless plug for my own Wiki engine that has (limited) WYSIWYG editing, security, attachments and support for searching over MS Office documents http://www.high-beyond.com. Open Source too!

Alan
Friday, August 27, 2004

"Service Unavailable"

Hey, pretty slick!!

muppet
Saturday, August 28, 2004

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