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Asperger's or just INTP's?

Joels comment along these lines seems like an amazing oversimplification based on the logical conclusion of untrained observation.  Based on his statement, many people that we know of as INTP's are instead mildly to somewhat autistic (in some way shape or form)? I've know a good number of mathmeticians, engineers, programmers, and even linguists, that all fit the INTP temperment type, but only one can I actually say displays any of the symptons associated with Asperger's.

I suppose the only reason I care to point this out is due to the fact that anyone could easily mistake an INTP or what some call extreme INTP's as one who suffers from Asperger's syndrome.

Then again, I could see how someone could look at all the heavenly bodies going by and logically asume we are at the center of things.  :-)

mas informacion aqui.
http://www.typelogic.com/intp.html

BDKR
Friday, August 20, 2004

You can call it INTP or Asperger's, or whatever you like, it's just a label.
People are not all the same and they don't all fit the ideal of their culture. The US loves extroverts, other cultures prefer introverts.
I myself am INT[PJ] (I don't really understand the difference between P and J), so I am not the cultural ideal or the majority. I feel I am on a different wavelength from everyone I know. Things that other people never see can be perfectly obvious to me, while what is obvious to everyone else can be a complete mystery to me.
I think being INT is fun, because I never run out of things to think about, can never get bored with life.
However, I am sure I don't have Asperger's because I am very empathetic. I could probably make a living as a fake psychic. However, I do know some people who fit the diagnosis -- utterly in their own world, obsessed with their projects, perfectionist, easily frustrated, highly intelligent, etc. But giving something a name does not make it a disease. People are different, to each  his own, etc. But I admit that trying to get along with them is a challenge.

Dr. Real PC
Friday, August 20, 2004

The Myers-Briggs personality stuff is good in that it helps you be more aware of how others see you and your own strengths and weaknesses. But I would suggest you don't take it too seriously.

It is based on theories, not on hard proven facts. A lot of the insights people gain from it is just rabbiting back what they chose on the questionnaire. "Do you find parties draining?" is the quesion, and then the feedback is "You find parties draining". Well, yes, that's right, that's what I wrote!

Results can differ depending on your mood, stress levels, nature of your work and relationships at the time of taking the questionnaire.

When I first did the Myers-Briggs thingy, I was classified as an "I" but so border line that if I had answered a couple of questions differently I would be an "E", therefore apparently with a entirely other temperament. Yet when people hear I am an "I" they might make possibly erroneous judgements about me based on that.

Herr Herr
Friday, August 20, 2004

Hey Dr. Real PC

I also don't understand the difference between P and J. Glad to hear I am not the only one.

Herr Herr
Friday, August 20, 2004

When I was 20-ish I went through a phase of doing lots of personality tests, and reading books etc.

I agree with Dr PC, they are just labels. For me the benefit of doing these tests was that is was a process of understanding that other personality types do exist.

I know it made me a better person, But then I have never been one to run around spouting this kind of knowledge out loud, I prefered it as a tool to understand rather then label.


I was at highschool today (prac experience) with two staff members heading somewhere. We passed a gril sitting on the steps. It was immediately obvious to me that this girl had no friends, and very likely wasn't going to gain any quick. He was a girl, who without any serious one-on-one help will probably not function in society. We walked passed her and one of the ladies that I was with told her to move, she shouldn't be sitting there because we had to walk around her. The lady told me later that this girl had Aspergers, and that she wouldn't make friends. I was somewhat shocked at the almost hateful attitude, it felt like something out a black/white movie set in Alabama in 1950 or something.

Not sure how pertenant that little tale is, I guess I am agreeing with Dr PC, there are some people who clinically need help, others just feel unsocial and rather not make phonecalls.....the difference is important. Labels for the sake of labels are not.

Aussie chick
Friday, August 20, 2004

The P goes on the bottom half of the sandwich and the J goes on the top.

Unless you drop them, in which case they both face downword and stick to the floor that, incidentally hasn't been swept recently as evidenced by the cat hair and rice grains under the lip of the cupboard in front of the sink.

_
Friday, August 20, 2004

Doctor Real isn't really a doctor.  He just plays on on JoS.

Strangelove
Friday, August 20, 2004

Well folks, I'm not agreeing that it's 'just a label'.  If you consider that labels are what people (in groups or otherwise) use as a foundation for how to treat one another, then it becomes important to either not label at all, or make sure we accurately label.

Cheers,
BDKR

BDKR
Friday, August 20, 2004

"hasn't been swept recently as evidenced by the cat hair and rice grains under the lip of the cupboard in front of the sink."

Woah, who told you about my kitchen?

www.MarkTAW.com
Friday, August 20, 2004

So not wanting to talk to people is normal for some people?
I'm a much happier person now. :-)

Jon
Friday, August 20, 2004

I guess everyone has a different ratio for how much time they want to spend alone vs. talking. I think mine is 80/20.
I often prefer reading because you get more new and interesting information, whereas when talking to people you hear the same old stuff, usually. However, you need to talk just for the emotional contact, to not feel completely alone on earth.

Dr. Real PC
Friday, August 20, 2004


I'm an ENFP, as I am dealing with some health problems getting more and more extraverted, which means that one gets energy from being around other people.

Unfortunately the most common profile for software is exactly the opposite in all four categories. No wonder I feel like I'm in the wrong business.

dot for this one
Friday, August 20, 2004

My wife the psychologist assures me that, although Asperger's can be treated with medication, there is so far no cure whatever for being INTP.

jdm
Friday, August 20, 2004

You seemingly intelligent people actually BELIEVE in Myers-Briggs?

Gosh, it's scary.

http://skepdic.com/myersb.html

Neanderthal man
Friday, August 20, 2004

"My wife the psychologist assures me that, although Asperger's can be treated with medication, there is so far no cure whatever for being INTP."

LOL!

I gues I have a tough road ahead of me.

BDKR
Friday, August 20, 2004

Here's a question about the I/E letter in the MBTI:

How do online conversations that take place while one is at a computer factor into the I/E?  i.e. can the interaction that takes place in AIM be considered part of the "energy" involved in intro- vs. extroversion?  Would an introvert feel "drained" by online human contact?

How about message boards?

indeed
Friday, August 20, 2004

I suspect that online interaction is popular with INTPs, etc. precisely because it _isn't_  particularly draining on the emotions.  This draining effect is probably due to the difficulty some of us have in trying to discern what the other person is thinking/feeling when intereacting with us.  Since our intuition in this area is practically nil, we just get frustrated.

As an aside, I find that the older I get, the more extraverted I become.  Probably because the older I get, the less I give a sh*t.

jdm
Friday, August 20, 2004

Myers-Briggs is a crock, because there are definitely more than 16 personality types in the world, and each of the four letters they use are definitely not orthogonal to each other. Definitely.

Rainman
Friday, August 20, 2004

Actually... the Myers Briggs has been carefully calibrated so that each of the 4 axes really are independent. It's a very impressive piece of work. None of the similar spin off tests are as consistent either.

Dennis Atkins
Saturday, August 21, 2004

I still prefer "Who's your favorite Beatle?"  I think I'm a George.

Burned Out
Saturday, August 21, 2004

People are too different for one 4-letter combination to sum up their personality.

However, there really is some meaning to it.  The way it correlates highly with different occupations amazed me.  The general population has a certain distribution of MB types (see http://www.internet-encyclopedia.org/wiki.php?title=Myers-Briggs_Type_Indicator ),  but certain occupations are heavily loaded in certain categories.

For example, only 5.4% of the general population is INTx, but for programmers it is over 20% (IIRC), and this was reflected when HR for my company decided to administer the test across the IT department (which has over 1000 people).

T. Norman
Sunday, August 22, 2004

> He was a girl

No wonder his head is fscked up.


Tuesday, August 24, 2004

"People are too different for one 4-letter combination to sum up their personality."

That may sound good on the surface, but it's a simplification at best. According to Myers-Briggs, within any designation, there are gradations. Additionally, there are cross over types. Lastly, and to murky the water completely, individuals may change type or take on characteristics of other types during thier lifetime.

So when you get right down to it, those 4 letter combo's actually do a pretty good job of providing a baseline for helping one understand what's really goin' on upstairs. Is it garuanteed to be correct? No, but it hasn't done to bad of a job in the eys of a good many to date.

Cheers

BDKR
Friday, August 27, 2004

Err...., the little rant above, I mentioned Myers-Briggs, but I meant to say Keirsey-Bates.

:-(

BDKR
Friday, August 27, 2004

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