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Would you ever get rid of your landline?

Between cell phones and VoIP, I wonder how many people will get rid of their landline telephones.

I was watching the news the other day, and they were showing the aftermath of hurricane Charley. The next commercial was AT&T touting their VoIP technology. The juxtaposition struck a chord.

Landlines were designed to operate on low voltage - powered directly through the phone lines themselves. So, in a power outage, the phones still work (assuming you keep a non-cordless one around the house).

In the case of the hurricane, I'm sure that both power and phone lines were knocked out, but there are plenty of other emergency situations where that's not the case.

Just something to ponder.

Yet another anon
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Got rid of my land line two years ago.  99.9% of the time it was only used by telemarketters anyway.  I'm saving $600/year by not having it.

muppet
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Got a job 110 miles from home.  Communicate with family using Cell Phone.  $40.00 per month/no long distance charges, no cords, goes everywhere I go.  The cable modem meets my other communcation needs. 

Nope, no plans for a landline here.  Heh.

Greg Kellerman
Thursday, August 19, 2004

My business is in my house. So, I'd not want to get rid of the landline for the business. Just not worth the possible savings.

But, for home, I'd probably be willing to do that.

However, the benefit of having 5 phones around the house is pretty handy.

(I.e., I think it's a bit complicated to wire up VOIP for all the home phones. You CAN do it, I'm sure. But you'd need to run a phone line from the PC to the demarc (outside the house) to wire it up easily.

Mr.Analogy (ISV owner)
Thursday, August 19, 2004

The landline goes when we drop ADSL for radionet.

trollop
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Two words:

NYC Blackout.

Besides, you can get basic land line service real cheap if that's all you're worried about.

Note: Requires you have phones that don't require AC.

www.MarkTAW.com
Thursday, August 19, 2004

And don't forget about brain tumor!

Kobi
Thursday, August 19, 2004


My wife and I got rid of our landline back in November and we've only missed it once or twice.

Besides, even with BASIC service... no caller id, no call waiting, no LD, and rarely using it, the bill was still $25 a month.  And my cell bill was only $40 a month will all of that.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I can't get rid of the landline, because my wife calls her mom in Romania all the time, and I haven't found better international rates than the landline ones.

Kyralessa
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Kyralessa: If you have broadband, try VoIP - specifically Vonage. I have lots of calls to Germany, and since they offered me 3 cents per minute, I took the deal.

I dropped my landline three months ago and am not looking back. No frigging telemarketers yet.

(I expect them to show up sooner or later, once somebody sells my phone number. But at least Vonage themselves doesn't seem to be selling that info)

Robert 'Groby' Blum
Thursday, August 19, 2004

If your wife's mom in Romania has VoIP, there's a a service that will let you make free VoIP to VoIP calls.

Or there's Yahoo/AIM voice chat.

Romania's telecom infrastructure is much worse than Germany, so calls to there (and the Ukraine, and other less developed eastern european countries) are more expensive.

www.MarkTAW.com
Thursday, August 19, 2004

> If your wife's mom in Romania has VoIP

Should be:

If your wife's mom in Romania has internet access, preferrably broadband.

www.MarkTAW.com
Thursday, August 19, 2004

There was a lanslip in Wellington yesterday (one of several: we've had atrocious weather here recently). Which knocked out most of the cable modem internet access around the city. But the phones kept going. I'm sticking with landline...

bah_humbug
Thursday, August 19, 2004

We haven't had a land line for three years. My wife and I both just have a cell phone. I have one number for everything. Business/personal/etc. It's great.

Kyralessa - My wife's family is all in Cuba, so I can relate. However, almost any decent calling card will blow away land line rates. We've been using http://www.callingcard.com for the last year or so and it is amazingly great. I don't know why there's not more buzz about them. You set up an account, and then set up their system to recognize your phone numbers, so you don't have to deal with pins and access codes. Then you can also set up speed dial numbers, so in total it takes 5 button presses for my wife to call Cuba or Spain. They have local access numbers and 800 numbers.

Their rates are slightly higher than it would be with the cheapest calling cards, but the reliability and ease of use make it the best deal around. A quick check shows that their rate to Romania is $0.30/min, or $0.21/min for the Bucharest area. Factor in their 20% bonus if you refill your account with $100 and you are at $0.17/min. Probably hard to beat.

Check them out, they've been great for us.

  --Josh

JWA
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Would I ever get rid of my line?  Maybe if... oh wait, that already happened, well over a year ago.  Remind me again why people with a broadband connection still want to pay $40/month so they can call across town?

Greg Hurlman
Thursday, August 19, 2004

When I can plug in my cell phone somewhere in my house and have all other phones in the house ring when the cell phone number is called I'll get rid of the land line.  I don't have anywhere to stick the cell phone when I'm walking the house nude...

nekkid dude
Thursday, August 19, 2004

It's called a cell socket. Of course, every phone provider has its own strange interface to their phone, so you'll have to get one specific to your model phone.  Don't know how well they work, either.

mb
Thursday, August 19, 2004

or a nokia premicell

mb
Friday, August 20, 2004

I live in Germany. My mother lives in New Zealand. At 18,000 kilometres, it's barely possible to find two countries further away from each other.

On a landline, by dialing 01079 before I dial my mother's number, I get charged less than 3 euro cents per minute: 2.6 cents to be precise. One time I called I left a message on her answering machine and the bill was 2 cents!

I'm keeping a landline.

Herr Herr
Friday, August 20, 2004

"I don't have anywhere to stick the cell phone when I'm walking the house nude..."

Well, there's one place...

Justin Johnson
Friday, August 20, 2004

"When I can plug in my cell phone somewhere in my house and have all other phones in the house ring when the cell phone number is called I'll get rid of the land line.  I don't have anywhere to stick the cell phone when I'm walking the house nude..."


These are becoming more common... one name is "cell socket" as someone noted above, but I have seen them called by other things.

One of my coworkers just got one for his Verizon phone... I'll try to track him down on that one.

KC
Friday, August 20, 2004

I gave up my land line back in 1998 and haven't missed it since. At the time I was fighting with US West (now Qwest) about a T1 line they had left active for an additional 3 months, and the thought of handing them more money for a land line was revolting.

AT&T's One Rate service came to my rescue. Anywhere I went, I had my phone and I didn't pay extra (at the time $60/month wasn't a problem).

It came in handy when I moved from Seattle to NY: I was able to keep my old number until I got settled. Of course, now that I live in the Hudson Valley area, I can't use AT&T (who always offered amazingly good customer service) and have been relegated to Cellular One.

Jeff Watkins
Friday, August 20, 2004

I'd actually like to do away with the VoIP if I could... but cellphones don't like to work so well inside my apartment.  I've been looking at booster antennas - but the ones you connect to your phone tie you down to a wire - oh so 1980s.  The only other alternative I've seen is those stick-on antenna boosters that typically stick over the antenna or under the battery - does anyone know if they actually work, or are they just "as seen on tv" crap?

Greg Hurlman
Friday, August 20, 2004

I haven't had one for three years.  No problem.  My cell plan doesn't allow for international calls (which is normally not an issue) but if I need to make one, I get a phone card.  Pretty simple.

D. Jackson
Friday, August 20, 2004

To sum up :

1. Get VOIP.
2. Use your cell phone as backup.
3. Use calling cards both from your cell phone and home phone. (You can program in the access number and pin and number to be dialed, so it's a one-touch process to actually reach the number).

Last, but not the least :
4. Ditch your landline.

Now what is it that a landline can do and this setup cannot ?

InsideInfo
Friday, August 20, 2004

>>The only other alternative I've seen is those stick-on antenna boosters that typically stick over the antenna or under the battery - does anyone know if they actually work, or are they just "as seen on tv" crap?

I read an interview with an engineer that worked on cell phones and, when asked about these 'boosters' said something like "if the boosters worked, don't you think we'd be building them in?"

RocketJeff
Friday, August 20, 2004

I'm getting rid of it. Contempt is what I have for the phone companies. Anyone ever remember that editor/publisher from Boardwatch years ago? He must have infected me.

I call Brazil a lot so I needed a landline. That is until I found a company that sells prepaid cell phone service. I pay US$.50 a day to keep my phone up and I get a US$0.14 rate to Brazil which is better than the US$0.25 rate I got with MCI but of course you can get rates as low as US$0.12 to outlying regions of Brazil through phone cards. http://www.stimobile.com/ is the company and they have good rates to other countries. If I don't keep the phone alive for 15 consecutive days then I lose my phone number. But I was recently in Brazil for 3 weeks and I left my phone with no value. When I returned I bought US$25.00 of time and I still had the same phone number (this is not important to me otherwise I would have kept it active or bought a follow me service).

I'm goin to get rid of my landline within the next week. I use cable (much, much better than DSL) for net access.

Phone companies want yesterday back again.

me
Friday, August 20, 2004

>I'm saving $600/year by not having it.

I guess I don't talk as much, nor feel any need to be always reachable. I pay $16.66 for residential flat-rate service from SBC (1/3 of it is fees) and then pay $0.033 / minute (no minimum or monthly fee) for intrastate/long distance from pioneer telephone. So my total bill is always under $25/month and my phone still works when something goes wrong.

Eric Moore
Friday, August 20, 2004

I haven't had a landline in quite some time.  I have 2 cell phones.  It's still cheaper.

Neo
Friday, August 20, 2004

If I get rid of my land line, I can say goodbye to my ADSL and TV connections

Juergen Zeinier
Sunday, August 22, 2004

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