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ASP vs. ASP.Net

I'll start off by saying that I'm NOT trying to start a discussion about whether ASP is better than ASP.Net, rather, I'm curious how many people are still programming plain old active server pages, how long people see the old style active server pages staying around. As for me, I do some programming at the University I attend, and even I _could_ use ASP.Net other people maintain my code when I'm not around, and they cut-n-paste ASP Code and use Dreamweaver/Frontpage and the ilk, and while they're amenable to using newer stuff, the fact is, they have to understand and fiddle with it while I'm not around, so it seems better to stick with what's known.

So is anyone else in this situation? Will old-school active server pages be around for quite a while or will it just drop off the earth soon?

Matt Estes
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I use both and although there's undoubtedly improvements in ASP.NET over ASP classic there's something to be said for old classic ASP. It's simple, easy to understand and quick to make small scripts in, uses a lightweight language that doesn't force you to declare all the types beforehand, and better fits what actually happens between the web server and browser.

Matthew Lock
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Still using classic ASP, but will probably start some smaller projects in ASP.Net over the coming year.

Yoey
Thursday, August 19, 2004


Still using old-school asp as that's what most of the existing apps are written in and my group doesn't want to learn anything new right now.

That and we are each supporting 8 projects...  times 12 developers....  yeah.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004

We still use almost exclusively classic ASP, with only a couple guys being "allowed" to do any real projects in .NET.  There is another team that does more .NET.

On my own, I'm very interested in .NET so I'm trying to explore it on my own time.  If I had my druthers, I'd never use classic ASP again, and use PHP for anything where classic ASP would be considered appropriate.

Clay Whipkey
Thursday, August 19, 2004

We're still doing a lot of classic ASP here.  We are adding to and supporting several large existing classic ASP sites.  The biggest problem with ASP.Net is it's not trivial to integrate ASP.net with classic ASP applications.  Some of our new stand alone apps use ASP.Net and I'd like to see us transition our old classic ASP pages to ASP.Net, but I don't see it happening.

chris
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Oh, and to answer your question... I think you'd be better off using classic ASP by the sounds of the people who are going to be maintaining it.

chris
Thursday, August 19, 2004


And don't forget that MS keeps breaking the previous .Net runtimes each time they release a new version.

Bastards.

Classic asp will be around for years to come as there are just *too* many apps built in it to replace them any time soon.  It's  like all the Cobol apps that were still around at y2k.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I'm still using classic ASP for my client projects.  I don't believe that ASP.NET offers sufficiently increased value to justify making the switch.

I read up on it to stay familiar with the concepts for when I eventually switch over, but that's not going to happen for at least another release or two.

ASP works.  It just works.  ASP.NET still seems to have some stability issues to be worke dout.

www.ChristopherHawkins.com
Thursday, August 19, 2004

"And don't forget that MS keeps breaking the previous .Net runtimes each time they release a new version."

Patently untrue. Cite please, or are you a troll?

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I'm still using ye olde ASP with VBScript. I hate it though - it takes so long to do stuff I know I can do faster / better / cleaner in other languages / environments....

We're talking about 1 line of code in Python / perl / Ruby etc. vs. 10's-100's in VBScript.

[insert rant here about VBScript 'classes', arrays, collections, lack of constructors, error handling etc. etc.]

<-.->
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I have moved everything to .NET /C# but still maintain a ton of ASP code.  Can I just say that I detest VBscript?

Sassy
Thursday, August 19, 2004

"Patently untrue. Cite please, or are you a troll?"

Well, with my last company, the development was all on .Net v1.0.  Major portions of which were compatible with v1.1

Currently, we're preparing for the problems that will pop up with v1.2 and we've sent a pair of developers to Microsoft's "training sessions" which enumerate the changes that will have to happen with our existing (albeit small) .Net codebase.

I could go into the issues with XP Service Pack 2, but I'll pass right now.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I'm an old ASP hack, who some time ago found myself immersed in J2EE projects - JSP with Struts and lots of the heavy code in Java Beans. Sometimes I long for the simplicity of ASP - it was just so easy to do what most web applications have to do - put data into a database and get it out again!

But try finding a well-paid gig as "ASP hack" today...

Herr Herr
Thursday, August 19, 2004

"Well, with my last company, the development was all on .Net v1.0.  Major portions of which were compatible with v1.1"

I'm assuming you mean 'incompatible'...

There were only 3 breaking changes between 1.0 and 1.1 - all fairly obscure APIs. If your code didn't use them, it should run unchanged. There are issues with running 1.0 compiled assemblies on the 1.1 runtime, but that's what side-by-side framework installs are for - 1.0 code should always run on the 1.0 framework and so on.

The only real problem with the 1.1 changeover on ASP.NET is that IIS globally switches to using 1.1 for all applications after you install, and it's not easy to switch individual apps back to using 1.0. (Incidentally, the 2.0 framework adds a picker tool to IIS to allow you to specify the framework version to use for each Web app).

2.0 definitely introduces more changes, but again they are mostly add-ons rather than breaking changes. The ASP.NET model has changed radically, certainly, but the old model is still supported and it's perfectly possible to compile your 1.1 Web apps on 2.0 and have them run as before. And of course, as intended, you can continue to run your 1.1 apps on the 1.1 framework side-by-side with the new version. You need 'upgrade' only if you want to take advantage of the new 2.0 features like generics.

Where's the problem?

"I could go into the issues with XP Service Pack 2, but I'll pass right now."

Microsoft just can't do anything right, can it? It gets constantly canned for prioritising features and backwards compatibility over security, and then when it addresses the security issues and sacrifices backwards compatibility for it, it gets canned as well. For the record, I'm using SP2 on all my machines, and I've yet to encounter a problem with any app other than StyleXP (which patches a DLL in memory to do its work and might well be expected to break on a service pack).

Some people are just never happy...

.NET Guy
Thursday, August 19, 2004

I know a really large intranet running in ASP and being actively maintained. I was involved in development of the project 5 years ago and it is still going strong.

Two of my online bank accounts with different banks use ASP apps.

It's not going away in a hurry because people generally keep things running once they are working.

Sound like Cobol?

Herr Herr
Thursday, August 19, 2004

"Microsoft just can't do anything right, can it? It gets constantly canned for prioritising features and backwards compatibility over security, and then when it addresses the security issues and sacrifices backwards compatibility for it, it gets canned as well. For the record, I'm using SP2 on all my machines, and I've yet to encounter a problem with any app other than StyleXP (which patches a DLL in memory to do its work and might well be expected to break on a service pack).

Some people are just never happy..."

No actually they have some beautiful apps that I wish had equivalents elsewhere...  the SQLServer admin interface (not the database iteself), Visio, and Access as a database frontend are by far my favorites.

Actually, we have early access to one of the SP2 betas and it broke a good number of our applications:  just our timesheet application, project management tool, and our primary billing/receipt system.

These are the primary applications in our company which ensure that people get paid (paychecks and bills), bills go to clients, and the books are up to date.

While some of this is likely due to sloppy programming from the start, the application of SP2 still breaks our applications.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004


And for the v1.0 to v1.1 compatibility, we have run into numerous compiled program issues.  It gets to be an even bigger mess when some of our applications were compiled in VB6, so they utter fail also.

After all of our systems are "upgraded" to .Net, we are going to have to keep a non-upgraded system around just to compile these older applications that are still in heavy usage.

KC
Thursday, August 19, 2004

Those who still need to work in ASP are not alone. Check out the Classic ASP Framework at:

http://www.gotdotnet.com/workspaces/workspace.aspx?id=69b08b15-d456-4cf9-8b12-d4642ef0c22e

Is an open source framework that lets you work in Classic ASP just like you were working in ASP.NET

Christian Calderon
Tuesday, August 31, 2004

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