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Recruiting requires effort

This just popped into my head: any bona fide business should expect to spend a fair amount of effort to locate and recruit suitable employees or contractors.

This process is a built in cost of doing business. And there are no shortcuts.

Sic: placing an ad and expecting to find the right candidate is an erroneous shortcut. So is farming out a "programming test" at only which the most elect/wisest/most perfect candidate should succeed.

Just as customers don't immediately form a mind-meld with an ISV and buy your product; just as clients don't line up at 9AM in front of a consultant's office door; just as any business owner may find it expeditious to not do business with certain individuals or companies and to do w/o business in order to deal with more compatible customers; so too, finding employees or contractors who mesh with your expectations requires a distinct effort.

The ultimate fallacy of the bloated web shop recruitment ad that was dissected to death today is that a "correctly" worded employment ad can be a "locator beacon" for just the right candidate who is absolutely perfect. The owner maintained this fictitious justification all the way through.

I've known business owners who thought like this over the years. Even in a weak employment market when they were slobbering like pigs over picking up the perfect person cheaply, they were quite surprised and disappointed that the whole process was much more involved and subject to variability than they wished.

Just  having money to pay doesn't guarantee anything in particular.

This fallacy transcends any correctness of individual points in the ad. It also says, quite blatantly, that whomever placed the ad has no wisdom about human relationships nor business relationships.

It's a newbie's ad.

There, that should keep the sh*t flying. :-)

Bored Bystander
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Hardly.  You're wrong.  Wrong wrong wrong.  Sit there in your wrongness and be wrong.  While a properly worded job posting is not a locator beacon for Mr. Ideal Candidate, it IS your first line of contact for candidates, and can be your first line of defense for undesirables.

muppet
Saturday, August 14, 2004

I'm basking in my wrongness. Getting a nice tan, too.

Bored Bystander
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Bored just don't give up on that ad. Were you one of the people they had a bad experience with then? Is that why you feel so compelled to trash them? Very transparent!

Neo
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Good gosh, Neo. This guy never even revealed the name of his company to me. And he went completely silent after one phone call.

Does "jerked around" mean a thing to you?

Bored Bystander
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Neo is an idiot who didn't RTFP and thinks you're talking about the Siobhan want ad.

I think he's the Maxx Headroom guy from Siobhan's site, here to defend her honor in a very thin disguise.

muppet
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Oh, wait, Neo, you mean the ColdFusion ad. Never mind.

Answer: hardly. I'm an embedded and Windows developer. As far removed from web stuff as you could imagine. I've been in the computer industry longer than the web princess has probably been alive.

I see a certain pattern of thinking and I call it.

Bored Bystander
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Bored yah I meant the cf ad. You have raised it over and over and over and over and over and over. Its old. 3 new threads on it? Let it go man.

Muppet no I am not Maxx Headroom. Much better looking thant that.

Neo
Saturday, August 14, 2004

You're Queen Bee?


Saturday, August 14, 2004

Oh yah. Get real.

Neo
Saturday, August 14, 2004

Actually, I have found recruiting to be quite easy.  I parcel out my projects into small bits and then post them on the web as "tests" to see if the wannabe programmer is qualified to work for me.  It's worked quite well.

muppet
Saturday, August 14, 2004

As to the original issue, I have to say that getting in real talent is a major pain. I've spent plenty of time on both sides of the table, and both are a nuisance.

The shop where I just started working seems to have the best solution, although it's slow going.  I don't know everything that went into their recruiting process, but I know that they didn't hire me based on a keyword match. The reason is pretty simple: I haven't programmed enough in either their language or their industry long enough to list that on my resume.  They also made a point of calling on all of my references, and my offer was actually held up by a day because of a phone receptionists strong salesman filter (it's impossible to get a call through her if she doesn't know you for a legitimate, non-soliciting caller).  It took a lot of work on their part, but I've made the mistake before of not doing that, and I know the ugly costs that it brings.

Clay Dowling
Sunday, August 15, 2004

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