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Solving the .NET/Java market penetration problem

Disclaimer: this is a commercial product I am talking about, and I work for the company.

As we have a Java product and we are getting ready to do try out .NET as well, the issue of the user having the JRE/framework on his machine is really hot for us. I saw other people on the JoS worrying about the same problem.

We devised a solution and I belive others could benefit fom it too.

As we also make an Windows Installer authoring tool, its latest release (1.8) creates installers that will check if prerequisite applications are present on the target machine and optionally download and install them. Supported are: Java Runtime Environment, .Net Framework, Visual Basic Script Engine, DirectX and more, together with user-defined applications.

http://www.advancedinstaller.com

Let me know if you have any suggestions, ideas, etc.

Enjoy,
Cata

Catalin (www.rotaru.com)
Monday, August 09, 2004

I sugest someone delete this thread. Want to advertise, buy a google add, don't polute.

Ogami Itto
Monday, August 09, 2004

And I suggest you stop reading at the disclaimer. I do not spam. This is a legitimate answer to a difficult problem often invoked here.

Catalin (www.rotaru.com)
Monday, August 09, 2004

I question the "legitimate" part.

It's not about determining whether or not somebody has the required runtime - it's about making sure the runtime is already in place because you can't expect the customers of a CityDesk-type product to go off and download the .Net runtime (or JRE) because they are so large over dialup.

Ankur
Monday, August 09, 2004

Hmm, it is not a perfect answer. But I think the user is much more likely to download the framework so he can run the program he already has, than the other way around.

Catalin (www.rotaru.com)
Monday, August 09, 2004

So, rather than using Installshield X (which is way cheap at the moment), your product would work if I was on either (or both) of those two platforms.

It feels (even if you have two flavours) like a specific hammer for a particular nail and I'm not convinced that there are anything like enough products that are targetted at both markets from the same codebase to make it worth buying for that USP. 

Both platforms have their own ready rolled solutions to the 'get me a huge runtime just to run a tiny app' problem so again it sounds like a solution without a problem.

Simon Lucy
Monday, August 09, 2004

It works with ANY prerequsite applications (DirectX, Visual Basic Script Engine etc.) - and the user can define more.

And it is WAY cheaper than Install Shield: $99.

Catalin (www.rotaru.com)
Monday, August 09, 2004

"And it is WAY cheaper than Install Shield: $99."

Perhaps you should read Eric's excellent Software Pricing article.

http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=172658&ixReplies=6

Nemesis
Monday, August 09, 2004

Catalin,

Sometimes you just can't win.

Someone will say it's too expensive, or too cheap.

Read Eric Sink's current article on MSDN:

If you lower the price, someone will complain it doesn't do enough. If you offer it free, people complain it costs too much disc space, blah blah.

I would, however, suggest you post in RESPONSE to the problem. You'll get less flak, which makes it more likely people will READ YOUR response.

Good luck.

Mr.Analogy
Monday, August 09, 2004

Thanks Mr.Analogy and Nemesis. I am reading the article right now.

Catalin (www.rotaru.com)
Monday, August 09, 2004

Honestly, this isn't the biggest penetration problem that most geeks face.

Dutch Boyd
Monday, August 09, 2004

I just upgraded to Installshield X for £55, that's around $99.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 10, 2004

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