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Your typical programmer's breakfast?

Mine:
fruits (anything available on the fridge) + oatmeal + chocolate powder for diabetic
use blender to mix with little bit of cold water
portion: 1 1/2 glass.

optional components:
yoghurt, honey

j. Goldstein
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Bacon, eggs, tom's, fried bread, and a big glass of orange juice.


Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Tom's what?


Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Coco Pops with a tiny tiny bit of milk Or Poached eggs (when my husband is nice enough to make them!)

Oh wait, I am not a programmer....

Aussie Chick
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

coffee

Aaron
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Oh Gosh, why are we answering questions about breakfast types.

Have we really sunk that low.

Is there no more intelligent life in the universe? *grin*

Aussie Chick
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

It used to be two or three double expressos and a blt(when I was a programmer).

Now it's chamomile tea and some fruit. Followed by  two or three double expressos and a blt when my resolve lapses, which is most days.

WoodenTongue
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

I get up around 10:00 still tired from coding into 1-2 the night before. Then I shower and come into work around 11:00, just in time to catch lunch with my colleagues, which doubles as breakfast.

jz
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Pop-tarts and Mountain Dew. Supercharges the synapses.

Rob VH
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Cold pizza!

Ewan's Dad
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Coco Pops too :)  + milk + 1 toast
+ News on TV

Throwaway
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Let's see... coffee from the train station, then coffee from the cart vendor guy outside my building, and then a Nutri-Grain bar around 10, though that part's optional.

Greg Hurlman
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Bacon/sausage, egg and cheese sandwiches and either a bottle of water or ice tea to wash it down.

Legion
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Three fat free waffles with fat free butter spray
One diet Mountain Dew

Anony
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Is this another PhD research project?

Oatmeal with raisons and tea. Then coffee and a candy bar when I get to work.

Tom H
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Soy Milk, an Apple, & a Boiled Egg (also mouth-freshner :)

Desi Inside
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

weekdays
2 blood pressure tablets,  brown asthma inhaler (2 pumps), subutamol inhaler (2 pumps), 1 hayfever tablet  (summer months)
+ 1 large mug of expresso (own machine)
+ 2 slices of toast

weekends
As above + a selection of the following: bacon, fried egg, omlette, sausages, mushrooms, fried slice, bubble&squeak, black pudding,  onions, hash browns.  Curry has not been unknown.

I have arteries of steel.

a cynic writes...
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

2 bananas, an orange, a peach, several cups of coffee

Eat Me
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Usually 3 slices of bread with orange juice.

I wonder if there's some kind of power drink I can make that is healthy, will give me more energy, is more convenient than chewing, and faster to eat. I think I'll need to look into that.

sid6581
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

3 fags and a cuppa

_
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Black coffee (instant).
Then more black coffee work (it's free, but lousy -- but as long as it has caffeine).

Dr. Real PC
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"...bubble&squeak, black pudding,..."

Can someone translate these into American?

Jim Rankin
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"...bubble&squeak . . .

Boiled cabbage, bits of old she-sheep thats been hanging around the fells for too many years to count, all boiled in stale beer until it smells like the inside of an old bothie. Generally eaten by old northerners in flat caps and mouldy tweed jackets.

, black pudding,..."

pigs blood, oats, bits of offal, lumps of lard. All stuffed into an old bit of intestine and boiled till it's the consistency of damp chalk.

generally eaten by people who have given up the will to live and Welshmen.

I like a bit of pickled tripe myself.

WoodenTongue
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Not a programmer any more, but:
1 piece whole-wheat bread with peanut butter
1 small hunk feta cheese
12 oz skim milk
1/2 cup gf's leftover tea
4 chocolate-covered espresso beans
grapes (red and green seedless)

(kind of a mishmash, but that's what happens when you stand in front of the refrigerator grazing... )

followed by
1 9-mile bike ride to work

- former car owner in Queens
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Were you living in Stevenage? Look what you done.
For shame.

http://www.hmce.gov.uk/news/reg-nr-sou-3702.htm

caltrop
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

My definitions are as follows:

Bubble & squeak: mixture of mashed potato & green vegetables (usually but not always cabbage) shallow fried  - fried leftovers in other words.  You get a really nice crust if you lightly dust with flour.

Black pudding - a type of sausage made from pigs blood.  Cut into slices & shallow fried.

...and I'd like to add while I have been to Stevenage,  I've never lived in nor eaten bubble & squeak there.  But then if that bloke bought the prepackaged stuff out of Tescos he deserves all he gets.  tut tut.

a cynic writes...
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

spam, spam, spam, eggs and spam.

MilesArcher
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

This thread has only further demonstrated that what the British consider 'food' is highly... interesting.

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

... and considering some of the lists here...

http://www.fourmilab.ch/hackdiet/www/hackdiet.html

Fred
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Chocolate Croissant every morning before work.

Keith Wright
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Come on muppet, I'm sure there are some American foods that we wouldn't touch.  Just  because some of us have, shall we say,  a certain suicidal fondness for the frying pan there's no need to turn your nose up in horror. 

Just as well I didn't mention my condiment of choice...

a cynic writes...
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

as for my breakfast:

Benhana or Rainbow roll, as often as possible, with iced earl grey tea.

Failing that, just plain iced earl grey, or lemon tea, if I'm out of the former.

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Watching someone eat a breakfast burrito off a paper plate has to be one of the most nauseating experiences, black pudding and fried bread is simple fare in comparison.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

You don't think watching someone eat black pudding is nauseating?  I'll agree that an improperly handled breakfast burrito is not a pretty sight, though.

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Not unless they're a klutz and they get black bits all over their face.

Mostly it would probably make me feel hungry, but only if there was proper bacon involved, possibly a sausage or two and a couple of eggs fried in olive oil.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Ugh, we'll just have to agree to disagree about the vomit-inducing qualities of black pudding, then.

Also, olive oil?!  You're not British!!

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Can't say many (any?) Brits I've met consider black pudding 'food'... yuck.

I think you'll find there isn't really much of a consensus on what British Food 'is'. Apart from the few silly cliche old-fashioned dishes that noone apart from your northern grandmother ever cooks anymore, spotted dick, black pudding, bubble and squeak, whatever. Noone I know really eats that stuff. There are some nice regional recipes and specialities I guess though. Cornish pasties, scones with clotted cream and strawberries etc.

But yeah British food these days is pretty much just a mix of all sorts of stuff from all over the world, much like america but with less fast food consumption and obesity :-p

Back on topic, my breakfast (if I get up in time to sit down and eat breakfast) would normally be orange juice, black coffee, half a grapefruit and a croissant. Or sometimes a bacon/tomato sandwich or something.

Matt
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

what in the world is clotted cream, anyway?  Is that like sour cream?

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Its cream that's been partially churned, its extremely thick and high in fat content and its what you get in yer devon teas.

Cuisine is mixed and varied.  We'll have traditional kinds of food, including all of what's been mentioned up to now and more as well as food from around the world.  For the most part we'll do the cooking from the ground up, few convenience foods and most of those for my daughter.

For instance, very shortly I'll be having spaghetti putanesca, though right now I need my G+T more.

Simon Lucy
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

> Apart from the few silly cliche old-fashioned dishes
> that noone apart from your northern grandmother
> ever cooks anymore

Do Brits still eat bangers and mash?  Or blancmange?

(Right fond of a proper Devonshire cream tea, myself.

mmmm...  scones with clotted cream.... )

- former car owner in Queens
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Total Raisin Bran + juice of some sort.

except the once a week, or so, that i drop by panera for a cinnamon crunch bagel with hazelnut cream chesse.

brent
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

I relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls: thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, stuffed roast heart, liver slices fried with breadcrumbs, fried hencod's roes, and, of coures, grilled mutton kidneys with a fine tang of faintly scented urine.

MugsGame
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Surely blancmange is french? ('white eat' / white food )

Was never a fan of it myself. Bangers and mash... in the sense of having sausages and mashed potatoes in the same meal, I guess it's not uncommon. As a specially-named dish, perhaps less so

Matt
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

a good blowjob from my girlfriend is the best breakfast

 
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

I agree with <blank>.


His girlfriend really is good.

HaHa
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"I'm sure there are some American foods that we wouldn't touch"

Like scrapple, perhaps. Made from stuff that wasn't good enough for sausage.

Best fried crispy, with maple syrup!

sgf
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"a good blowjob from my girlfriend"

But she's the only one who gets any calories...

...
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Egg McMuffin and a large Coke.

Breakfast of Champions!

Mitch & Murray (from Downtown)
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Milk and cereal.

www.javasolutions.biz
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"Do Brits still eat bangers and mash?"

Yes - yesterday evening actually.  With onion gravy.  I will admit I'm the only one in the house who will eat pie & mash (long story),  black pudding  or haggis.  But then again I won't touch tuna which the rest of the family love. 

a cynic writes...
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Canned tuna is cat food. Now a good tuna steak seared on the outside, raw on the inside w/ some wasabi. Now that's good eats.

MilesArcher
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Miles, I have friends who agree with you.  I think seared tuna is foul.

I'll take raw super white tuna over that any day.

muppet
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

Both the French (le boudin) and the
Spanish (morcilla) eat black pudding. I like stuffing green peppers with it.
And here (Negombo) we have some of the best fresh tuna in the world at around $3 a kilo.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

"I'm sure there are some American foods that we wouldn't touch"

Grits...

What are they made of ?

Tom
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

Yummm, black pudding!

I think it is mostly eaten by people from the midlands/north that eat it, it never seemed very popular in the south (and they all talk funny as well).


Wednesday, August 04, 2004

Here in Norway we have a thing called surströmming which is the herrings in a tin for many months so that they ferment and go very nicely rotting. The tin swells up with the out-gassing. When you are opening the tin it is great in smell and very tangy. Please if you do not believe me you can google surströmming and see that it is real.

I like this for breakfast but one is banned from many places for eating it because of the great smell. My personal favourite is surströmming with kelp tea followed by an excellent drink of bitters like Gammeldansk or some similar. Beats your tasteless expresso any time.

I go to watch Man U from time to time because I am a big fan and once I took surströmming. My fanfriends were very critical but they eat their black pudding and one of them likes the "cheese of the head" which I believe is the brains of some farm beast and he has this on toast for breakfast with pints of Boddingtons. It is easy to buy at any butchers shop in Manchester (cheese of the head, not Boddingtons for which you need a licence for the selling).

Now I am rambing so I will do some work.

Norwegianwoody
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

sorry man.... but..... :-S .... arghhh

Throwaway
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

Boddingtons. Now there's compensation for Manchester's dreary climate.

I've never heard of the phrase "Cheese of the Head".
I've eaten "sweetmeats" which are crushed testicles, and obvioulsly I've eaten sheep's brain (though I did leave the eye in the eyesocket).

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

Grits are just hominy: coarsely ground hulled corn.  Many people may consider them flavorless (that's what all the butter and bacon are for, IMO) but hardly gross in the same sense that sheep's brains are.  America does still eat stuff like tripe in some corners.  Some guy at UVa wrote a book called Unmentionable Cuisine with all sorts of recipies for bugs and dogs and brains and the like. Fun to leave out on the coffee table for people to find.

Keith Wright
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

Tripe is adorable. My favourite is Galician tripe which is with chick peas and ham, but this conversation is making me nostalgic -- and hungry!

Now, the question I'm asking is why I've never seen an octopus here. Maybe they need cold water.

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

He means head-cheese, which is to say brains.

Typical ManU fan - can't speak bloody English properly but at least its not for the usual reason which is to say having no head-cheese of their own to speak of.

Northern Lad
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

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