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I am a great hacker

I am a great hacker.  It's not that I am a genius or that I'm gifted.  It's not the programming languages that I use nor my educational level.  It's not the college I attended nor is it the operating systems I work on.  It's not the money I receive for my work or my experience level.  It's not that I ace every interview or that I even know every question asked of me.  What makes me a great hacker is my endless pursuit of knowledge and my endless persistence in solving problems and creating solutions.  This is what makes me a great hacker. 

AnyMouse
Monday, August 02, 2004

talk to graham


Monday, August 02, 2004

And he's modest and good looking, too, I'm sure.

Thomas E. Kammeyer
Monday, August 02, 2004

Hmm....that is my definiation of a developer.

To me a hacker is the bastard that steals your credit card #, or infencts your email.

To each their own, I guess.

The Wanderer
Monday, August 02, 2004

Yes, I think patience, motivation and a desire to learn determine your ability a whole lot more than anything inborn or measure by IQ tests. That is what I had been trying to say before.
The most important thing is caring. If you don't care it doesn't matter how smart you might be. If you aren't interested how could you have the patience that's required?
Anyway, I think most of IQ is just patience with details, and knowing that what seems boring at first can turn out to be interesting and useful.
It's similar for athletic or artistic ability -- if somehow you become motivated to get past the initial frustrations, you can go on to become good at something.
I think that, maybe, what you need most of all is either encouragement from someone at a critical point, or else the ability to ignore everyone who says you're no good. Because no one is good at whatever it is during the initial stage of learning.
Once you get motivated in whatever it is, you can continue getting better at it, as long as there is either someone to encourage you now and then, or you are able to ignore discouragement or lack of encouragement.
That's the secret, as far as I'm concerned, to becoming really good at something. To become really great, on the other hand, you also have to be lucky enough to get the right idea at the right time. If Einstein didn't get his great idea, someone else would have, because it was the right time for that idea.
There might also be some inborn factors, but no one really knows. In my opinion they are much less important than motivation and interest, etc.

Dr. Real PC
Monday, August 02, 2004

infencts  = infects

The Wanderer
Monday, August 02, 2004

the stigma put on the term "hacker" is truly unfortunate.  It was not orginally a derogatory term.  I think you're a n00b, wanderer.

muppet
Monday, August 02, 2004

definiation ~ definition

cracker == thief

hacker  != thief *

* historical

trollop
Monday, August 02, 2004

And dont forget...

sacker == Sack of Shit

anon-y-mous cow-ard
Monday, August 02, 2004

Do you mean hacker as in insecure nerd that derives self worth from breaking into computer systems?  Or do you mean clueless untrained, inexperienced programmer that makes shit up as they go along and has to sprinkle their code with gotos because they don't know any better?

confused
Monday, August 02, 2004

Donn Parker used "hacker" in a negative context in a book on Computer Crime.

He has since apologized to the hacker community for defaming their name.

.
Monday, August 02, 2004

A "hack" is a clever way to solve a problem. It can be applied to getting into a locked room, a locked computer, or solving a programming problem. You could think of the MIT Blackjack team as hacking Las Vegas.

MilesArcher
Monday, August 02, 2004

"I think you're a n00b, wanderer."

Oh my God...did you just use the word "n00b"? Geebus. Grow the fuck up.

Agent Orange
Monday, August 02, 2004

A "hack" is not a clever way to solve a problem.  It's a temporary ugly solution in place because of the lack of an elegant solution.

Computer crime only has romantic connotations to insecure nerds.  If I walk down to the corner store and throw a brick through the window, does that make me a genius for exploiting that shops security flaw? No, it makes me an idiot.

confused
Monday, August 02, 2004

That was a good post anymouse. Your ego is forgiven.

Karthik 
Monday, August 02, 2004

Confused. Yes, but i has to be a clever ugly solution. If it's just ugly it's not a hack.

Example, if you fix a hole in a window with duct tape it's not a hack. If you fashion a fan belt out of duct tape that's good enough to get you home, it might be.

MilesArcher
Monday, August 02, 2004

"Oh my God...did you just use the word "n00b"? Geebus. Grow the fuck up."

I thought that was funny too.  Asshat and ass monkey can't be far behind (no pun).

Mike
Monday, August 02, 2004

"Geebus"?  Did you just use the word "Geebus"?  Oh my gosh, grow the fuck up!

muppet
Monday, August 02, 2004

The word hacking is actually considered a good term for working on code, and is not considered a term used for “quick and dirty” code.

As several have pointed out, much popular media has corrupted the word hacking, or hacker. This is unfortunate.

Here is a great example of a page that correctly uses the term hacking in the proper light

http://www.mozilla.org/hacking/

I think anyone who knows anything of mozilla will see how this term is used. This is a general term used, and especially so in the open source community. So, hacking, or a hacker is NOT considered anything to do with cracking systems.

Nor is the term to be confused with a “hack”, which most certainly is a quick and dirty solution.

And, of course, Eric S. Raymond’s book the Cathedral and the Bazaar also sheds light on this issue. You can find his writing here on this subject:

http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/hacker-history/

A quote from the above:

<quote>
It was also around this time that serious cracking episodes were first covered in the mainstream press—and journalists began to misapply the term ``hacker'' to refer to computer vandals, an abuse which sadly continues to this day.
</quote>

Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn

Albert D. Kallal
Monday, August 02, 2004

Back in the day (1980's) I wrote a program called The Hacker.

It wasn't for doing anything malicious, like breaking into bank computers (remember the War Games movie).

It was kind of like a very early version of Lutz Roeder's .NET Reflector and was designed and built to be useful for debugging and learning how things worked.

It was, as far as I know, unique at the time, in that it was written in Z80A assembler, but could re-locate itself in memory, to make room for loaded modules. It could even re-locate to the video RAM buffer and run from there, if space was at a premium. It looked odd on screen, you could literally see the stack, but it was a stunning solution.

It was supposed to be impossible for Z80A code to re-locate, while executing, like that. But then, "impossible" often just means nobody has figured out how to do it yet.

I guess that I was a great hacker in those days, although it was a commercial venture, so maybe that disqualifies me.

Nemesis
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

> sacker == Sack of Shit

JoS poster == slacker?


Tuesday, August 03, 2004

isn't "hacker" from hacking into phone lines using tones?

not so much about being a good coder as someone who sticks it to "the establishment".

Kenny
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

That would be "phreaking"... selling redboxen was a *good* business back in the day, or at least, so I heard.  Uh, yeah.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=phreaking

Utilitarian
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

I know what a blue box is, but what is a red box?

MilesArcher
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

It simulated the quick beeps that you heard in a payphone when you dropped in a quarter.

Greg Hurlman
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

"That would be "phreaking"... selling redboxen was a *good* business back in the day, or at least, so I heard.  Uh, yeah."

ah, my mistake.  still, i think the documentary on "hackers" i saw said that phreakers were the precursors to hackers...

Kenny
Tuesday, August 03, 2004

---" If I walk down to the corner store and throw a brick through the window, does that make me a genius for exploiting that shops security flaw? No, it makes me an idiot. "----

Wouldnt that depend rather a lot on what was on display?

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, August 04, 2004

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