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MSDN magazine doublethink.

Today I was waiting for a meeting to start.  A copy of the August 2004 MSDN magazine was in front of me, and I mindlessly started thumbing through it. 

The Editorial starts:

"Back around 1996 it was big news.  People suddenly realized that with just a telephone line and Internet Explorer, they could go shopping without ever leaving the comfort of their own home!"

I don't know anybody in 1996 that used IE.  It was Netscape all the way.  The fact that MSDN (and Microsoft in general) refuses to admit that the rest of the industry exists drives me nuts.  There aren't great new ways of thinking in these magazines. There are Microsoft ways of thinking. MSDN mag seems like the developer brainwashing department.  Do developers really fall for this stuff?

BTW, I think the Sears catalog came out before 1996.

christopher (baus.net)
Friday, July 23, 2004

Just typical marketing drivel.

I like advert I saw on www.technewsworld.com:

"Older PCs may be more vulnerable to viruses. Don’t get caught with your guard down. Upgrade to a new HP Business Desktop dc 5000 featuring the Intel® Pentium® 4 Processor with HT Technology today."

Yes, we all know that P4s are have inherent immunity to viruses, unlike older x86 processors.  Sad thing is, some people probably believe it.

AMS
Friday, July 23, 2004

I used IE in 1996. (As well as Netscape.)

Me And The View Out The Window
Friday, July 23, 2004

While I've been critical of MSDN Magazine for being a little too forward thinking at times (focusing entire issues exclusively on products that aren't even in beta), I do think it's fair that they present the world from Microsoft's perspective, just as a Mac magazine would word the same historical observation as if we were all sitting in front of our Mac IIIfx or whatever back in 96. I don't know the economics behind the MSDN Magazine empire, but I suspect there is substantial Microsoft subsidies given that they freely put their content online, with minimal advertising, shortly after hitting newstands.

In their defense, as an aside, I wrote an article for them that featured a technology that wasn't in Microsoft's strategic interest, I included references to leveraging Java applications as well as open source projects, and promoted the idea of supporting all browsers. None of this was disuaded or diluted to push the Microsoft line.

Dennis Forbes
Friday, July 23, 2004

"Back around 1996 it was big news.  People suddenly realized that with just a telephone line and Internet Explorer, they could go shopping without ever leaving the comfort of their own home!"

Obviously this was not edited for technical errors before publishing. It should read:

"Back around 1996 it was big news.  People suddenly realized that with Internet Explorer, they had to reboot every 5 minutes!"

free(malloc(-1))
Saturday, July 24, 2004

They're trying to re-write history. If I recall rightly, Internet Exploiter wasn't even in the game until late 1997. Up until then it was Nutscrape all the way.  ;-)

TheGeezer
Saturday, July 24, 2004

You're memory's fading Geezer. I was developing web-application (not websites) for IE 3.0 using ISAPI DLLs and <gasp> ActiveXForms in 1996.

Humbug
Saturday, July 24, 2004

And I was making Java be compatible with IE as well as Netscape back then, in 1996. Ah, what fun.

Me And The View Out The Window
Saturday, July 24, 2004

Ok so maybe the question is when was IE 3 released?

christopher (baus.net)
Saturday, July 24, 2004

Ok according to this:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?id=fh;%5Bln%5D;lifeprodi

IE 3 was released in August 1996.  I know exactly where I was then.  I was interning at Adobe in San Jose.  In my memory IE was not the dominate browser. 

christopher (baus.net)
Saturday, July 24, 2004

The Plus! pack for Windows 95, which came out in concert with Windows 95, included IE (presumably 1.0). Mind you it was a rather spartan browser (basically mosaic), but they did have a browser out.

Dennis Forbes
Saturday, July 24, 2004

IE was not the dominant browser in 1996. All the experts insisted Netscape would rule and IE would never be more than a tiny niche. These days they've gone on to open source.

Me And The View Out The Window
Saturday, July 24, 2004

I went from Mosaic to IE, and never used Netscape until later when I was creating web pages and needed compatability testing.  I know others who did the same.

Hub Dublin
Sunday, July 25, 2004

My experience with MSDN magazine, is that it tends to be about a year ahead of what I am doing at work. I find that tasks I am currently working on, are written up in issues about 12-18 months old.

Is it a good magazine? Yes. Are they wildly optimistic about somethings? Yessss, I would say so.

As for '96, we were using Netscape since 25 licences for it came with NetWare. Back in the old days when you were supposed to pay for browsers.

Peter
Tuesday, July 27, 2004

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