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IE Dungeon Gets Internet Connection?

http://blogs.msdn.com/ie

Anon
Thursday, July 22, 2004

ok.. all I want to know is how they're doing the shaded links dealie (where you don't have to click on the text to trigger the hyperlink) under "My Links".  There's no client side script in the page source.

muppet
Thursday, July 22, 2004

should be pretty easy to figure that one out... it's a layout issue, not an event issue, so why would they use script?

mb
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Did you look at the CSS muppet? :)

#leftmenu a:active,
#leftmenu a:visited,
#leftmenu a:link {
    display : block;
    color : #000;
    text-decoration : none;    
    margin-right : 0px;
    padding : 2px;
}

#leftmenu a:hover {
    background-color : #CCD5E0;
}

Joe
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Ooh, CSS has a good purpose!

AllanL5
Thursday, July 22, 2004

"Ooh, CSS has a good purpose! "

:: sigh ::

boogs
Thursday, July 22, 2004

display : block;

aha!  that's what I was looking for!

thanks

muppet
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Ok, ok, I was too eager. 

Still, I thought it was a cool application of CSS.

I don't tend to adopt a technology, until I can see some benefit from using it.  In other words, I don't use 'bleeding' edge technologies. 

AllanL5
Thursday, July 22, 2004

you consider CSS a bleeding edge technology?

If you don't see immediate benefit in CSS, then you most definitely have not used it to style an entire site.

HUGE time savings when changing the look/feel of a site, or better, providing the user with alternate 'skins'.

muppet
Thursday, July 22, 2004


Back in the day, CSS was widely (mis-)interpretted by various browsers and caused all kinds of problems.

Now that it and the browsers have had a chance to mature, CSS provides some amazing capabilities.

For our web app development, we always use a "BaseStykes.css" to provide some sort of standardization across all of our apps.  Then we use an app-specific css in order to tweak the application according to the client's tastes.

This makes deployment for many of our customers take minutes to hours as opposed to days or weeks.

KC
Friday, July 23, 2004

This has been used for years by IE developers and it worked fine without "display: block" at all.

I only recently finally stumbled over using that additional attribute myself, allowing the effect to work properly in non-IE browsers later than Netscape 4.x finally.  Perhaps the need for this extra touch of CSS kept this technique from being as widely known for browser compatability reasons?  Though it seems obvious now in hindsight, it sure took me an absurd amount of time to work it out on my own.

Hub Dublin
Friday, July 23, 2004

OK, so IE handled CSS for years (still does) in a non-standard way which breaks compatability (if I get a different result than most other browsers, it's broken), and that's a good thing?

ehh?

muppet
Friday, July 23, 2004

The basic thing that IE gets wrong is the box model width, which basically means that you can't hardcode width into your stylesheet. And you can use IE-specific hacks to get around the problem until a future version of IE fixes the problem.

Ankur
Saturday, July 24, 2004

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