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I want to start my own business because...

...then _I_ can have the final word in the argument on indentation style

...then _I_ can get my machine upgraded to 1 Gig without having to convince anyone else

Contributions welcome.

Herr Herr
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I want to start my own business because I want my own goddamn parking spot.  I'm sick of being relegated to a "waiting list" where particular salary grades float miraculously to the top.

muppet
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I want to have (and keep) my very own red Swingline stapler.

Wisea**
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I want to be the devil other people sell their souls to.

Aaron F Stanton
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Aaron,

I think the devil already is the devil, and being the immortal that it is, I don't think you will be getting its job any time
soon unless you can somehow convince it to retire to a remote dungeon hell hole. :)

:)
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I want to start my own business because I will not then be told that the most valuable contribution I can make is to keep my desk tidy.

Fernanda Stickpot
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

My previous post is true, by the way, not exaggeration.

Fernanda Stickpot
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I have two red Swingline stapler's. :-)

Once you go red, you never go back
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I would only employ people who had Quake 3 and other online gaming experience on there Resume's.

aku beg
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

because ... I'd like to get properly compensated (either monetarily, mentally, spiritually, or all the above) for all the long hours, weekends, etc. that I spend writing software, keeping up with the latest techs and trends, etc.

because ... I need to get out of this cubicle and monkey suit, ditch the 1 hour commute, be my own boss, and stop being a tiny cog in a multi-million dollar machine.

because ... you'll never get rich working for someone else

because ... I want to be a unique snowflake.

PopCulture
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Someone else stated it better than I can, so here's the quote and the reference:

"For me, the bottom line was I wanted to feel the pain of starting a company. I wanted to pay my dues, and I wanted to pay them now. Yes, I wanted to go into debt, have my ego crushed, and experience firsthand the thrill of working like a dog for months on end without a paycheck in sight. I wanted a battle, I wanted a chance to win a war."

http://www.mousedriver.com/book/book.htm

Ewan's Dad
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I hate getting up at some ungodly hour of the morning, driving through bloody roadworks before being herded into an overcrowded cattle truck,  then out into another one to face a day of tedium before going back through another 1 1/2 hours of it (assuming they whole bloody mess doesn't break down yet again) in the evening.  For the next 30 years.

I'm not having a good day.

a cynic writes...
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

So I can have a door to close and not worry someone will walk by and see me posting on a forum.

So I can fantasize about what a great boss I am and how my employees all love me (because they only complain about me when they know I can't hear).

So I can make enough money fast enough to quit the rat race before I die.

Dr. Real PC
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I've one URL for all of you...

http://www.despair.com/indem.html

Mark S
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Heaps of money.

What are you lookin' at?
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

i want software developed the right way.

Patrick
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Because I want someone else to do the boring part of the work.

Egor
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

It seemed like a good idea at the time.....

Bruce Johnson
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I've been "independent" -- doing my own thing, since 1995. Both in IT and other domains (spent a previous life as an independent claims adjuster). Let me be the gloom and doom guy and shatter all your dreams:

==> ...then _I_ can have the final word in the argument on indentation style

Until you work for a client/customer that has their own coding standards, and you're contractually obligated to conform to those standards.

==> ...then _I_ can get my machine upgraded to 1 Gig without having to convince anyone else

But only after convincing your deadbeat clients/customers to finally release their payables so you actually have the cash to make the purchase.


==> I want to start my own business because I want my own goddamn parking spot. 

Fair enough, but when you spend 4 out of 5 days out at client sites, it doesn't do you very much good to have your own parking spot at your location.


==> I want to have (and keep) my very own red Swingline stapler.

Have you completed your TPS reports yet?

==> because ... I'd like to get properly compensated (either monetarily, mentally, spiritually, or all the above) for all the long hours, weekends, etc. that I spend writing software, keeping up with the latest techs and trends, etc.

This doesn't happen automagically, just because you start a business. In fact, I'll go the other way -- once you start your own gig, you're even *less* properly compensated for the work you do. There's a lot more to running a busines than tech skills alone.

==> because ... I need to get out of this cubicle and monkey suit, ditch the 1 hour commute, be my own boss, and stop being a tiny cog in a multi-million dollar machine.

You'll still be a tiny cog -- in your client's machine.

==> because ... you'll never get rich working for someone else

True -- but you'll *rarely* get rich running a business. It's not an automatic trip to wealth. In fact, it is (for most startups) a quick trip to the bankruptcy courts. The statistics on new businesses failing are widely available on the web. Look 'em up. Be amazed.

==> because ... I want to be a unique snowflake.

<grin>


==> "For me, the bottom line was I wanted to feel the pain of starting a company. I wanted to pay my dues, and I wanted to pay them now. Yes, I wanted to go into debt, have my ego crushed, and experience firsthand the thrill of working like a dog for months on end without a paycheck in sight. I wanted a battle, I wanted a chance to win a war."

So true. If only more folks realized this.

(a) You *will* feel pain. Heaps of it.
(b) You *will* pay your dues -- with the more than likely possibility of no return
(c) You *will* have sleepless nights wondering about your debt load and how to pay it back.
(d) You *will* work like a dog
(e) You *will* have missed paychecks
(f) All with the likelihood that you won't even win the first battle, let alone the war.


==> I hate getting up at some ungodly hour of the morning, driving through bloody roadworks before being herded into an overcrowded cattle truck,  then out into another one to face a day of tedium before going back through another 1 1/2 hours of it (assuming they whole bloody mess doesn't break down yet again) in the evening.  For the next 30 years.

You'll do the same with your own business. Clients will schedule a 7:00 AM meeting, someplace way across town where you've got 30 miles of congested, road-construction delays, and face just as many (if not more) days of tedium.

==> So I can have a door to close and not worry someone will walk by and see me posting on a forum.

<grin>

This is actually a benefit! Hell, I don't even close the door. I own the place so who's gonna say anything to me?

==> So I can fantasize about what a great boss I am and how my employees all love me (because they only complain about me when they know I can't hear).

You're right. It's a fantasy.

==> So I can make enough money fast enough to quit the rat race before I die.

See above. Most new businesses go under -- and a large fraction thereof lead their founders to the personal bankruptcy courts.

==> Heaps of money.

You're dreaming.

==> i want software developed the right way.

Until your clients/customers/market decide they don't want to wait long enough, or pay enough money to do it the "right way".

==> Because I want someone else to do the boring part of the work.

You'll be doing it yourself for a long time before you can afford to hire help to do the boring stuff. You'd be surprised how much boring stuff your current management, HR department, accounting department, legal department, compliance, clerks, and all the other folks that are currently doing the "boring stuff". When you start out, you get to do all the boring stuff.

==> It seemed like a good idea at the time.....

It sure did didn't it.

I guess that's where I am now. It really did seem like a good idea.

The point I'm trying to make is that it ain't the dream most think it is. Less than 5% of you/us out there who attempt it, will still be in the same business in 10 years.  Most folks simply don't have what it takes. I'm not sure I do. My current business is almost 7 years old and I'm suffering severe burn out. Not sure. If I can make it another 10.

Sgt. Sausage
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

...I could steal great ideas from my co-workers and get credit for it...

Kenny
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

...I could get all the Marketing dept. putang I want ?

Wisea**
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Two chicks at the same time man.

Lawrence
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I totally agree with Sgt. Sausage. If you want to start your own business to make lots of money, be able to boss others around, or get the recognition you deserve, save yourself the bother.

The one good reason I saw was "So I can develop software the right way." I disagree with Sausage that you can't do this for clients - you can. You just have to explain it to them. As the owner, you will now be able to explain that to them face to face and have your decision be the final word in the matter. You are a professional and you have the right and responsibility to let your own experience and judgement trump that of the client. In the end, it is only you who are responsible for software that is either slipshop drek that you blame on the client's shifting requirements that you were unable to manage, or a finely crafted piece of art that delights the client and which you can be proud of.

Dennis Atkins
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

... So I can get rich
...So I cannot get Laid-off by somebody else

KS
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

==>The one good reason I saw was "So I can develop software the right way." I disagree with Sausage that you can't do this for clients - you can. You just have to explain it to them. As the owner, you will now be able to explain that to them face to face and have your decision be the final word in the matter. You are a professional and you have the right and responsibility to let your own experience and judgement trump that of the client. In the end, it is only you who are responsible for software that is either slipshop drek that you blame on the client's shifting requirements that you were unable to manage, or a finely crafted piece of art that delights the client and which you can be proud of.

Agreed, we all want something we can be proud of -- but, that doesn't change the fact that if they don't have the time or the money to "do it right" -- if you stick to your guns and insist on doing it "right", you're not going to keep them as a client. Sometimes there's simply not enough resources for the "right" thing to be done. And, it's not your call. You can be professional and explain it but you *never* get to "trump" the client. If they don't have the money or the time (or other resources), your trump card is useless and they'll find someone else who can hack it together with the available resources. It's your choice whether or not you want to work for the client under those conditions (limited resources), but it's the clients choice of hack -vs- "right".

Reference Joels writings on perfectionism. Business owners (your clients) make these decisions daily. Slipshod may be perfectly AOK with the client. If it's a choice of "right" -vs- staying in business, you can be certain which way the client's going to go. The real question is: do you want to go there with them?

Sgt. Sausage
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

how comes my point about having LAN gaming skills on potential emplyees RESUMES as a requirement didnt get a comment?

aku beg
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Sgt. Sausage is doing something wrong.

I have been independent since 2000, took 10 weeks of vacation last year, make money there I ever did working for anyone (by a factor of 4 and growing) and wouldn't trade it for anything.

I would guess, based on the people I know, that being self employed is like anything else- some do it well, some fail miserably, most are in the middle where it usually resembles any other job but just with different rules.

If you think you can do it well, I say nothing beats it.

Doing it Well
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Employees are defacto slaves.

simple truth
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

"Agreed, we all want something we can be proud of -- but, that doesn't change the fact that if they don't have the time or the money to "do it right" -- if you stick to your guns and insist on doing it "right", you're not going to keep them as a client"

But if you are developing shrink wrap software, you can develop it the right way, then see if the market accepts it.

I suppose the problem there is if someone does it the "quick and dirty" way and beats you to market.

But on the third hand, sometimes its better to let someone else get the pioneer arrows in the back first, anyway.

Jim Rankin
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Sarcastic answer:

Because I really, truly, believe that not enough people are exploited in this world & I want every opportunity to exploit as many people as possible,

Real answer:

Because I'm a stubborn iconoclast who clashes with authority figures & likes to do things my own way & in my own time (typically faster than corporate schedules anyway). And like the mouse book quoted above, because I want to be responsible for my own successes & failures in this life.

www.MarkTAW.com
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I can select my own secretary and receptionist.

killerwhale
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

After 11 pretty good years as a consultant, I MAY be about to hang it up. The decent contracts have been too far and few between since 2000, the contract agencies ("brokers") are scum sucking greedy morons whose selected role is to get in the way of meeting a client, and many clients in the general support arena are cheap inbred dumbasses who deserve to have screwed up PCs and networks because they won't pay anything for quality service.

Another factor is that the IT world is truly changing and not for the better. Each of us is regarded as more of a commodity than I have ever observed in my 20+ year career. When I started contracting in 1993, a software development contractor could get a rate that was a modest premium above the hourly "salaried rate" for a given position. This "risk premium" for contracting peaked in the late 90s - $100/hr was a standard median rate for contract software work whereas the equivalent permanent job would pay perhaps $65-80K. At present, the permanent job I am currently entertaining actually pays MORE per hour than comparable short term contract positions. The point is, IT contracting is looking very much like industrial temp labor - low prestige, abused workers, paid less than a permanent worker.

I know of Sgt. Sausage's business, we've spoken, and his experience is really close to mine. It's typical for an IT service business. You conform to whatever the client demands or that client simply won't have the work done by you. Most clients will do without rather than compromise with a contractor. A lot of it is small client pride and arrogance - "no vendor is gonna push us around."

Also, about working with small business, the typical clientele of a consultant: they're VERY lowbrow - they usually don't appreciate a smart person, esp a vendor. My take is that really small businesses, and even some substantial small businesses, were started by owners who had to go into business for themselves because they lacked a degree that would have enabled them to get a "good corporate job". A person who builds a business on their own labor & sweat is self educated and often resents those who have specialized knowledge or a professional degree. In fact there may be some resentment directed toward the consultant.

Also, the fact that you're kowtowing to a client's whims in addition to having to meet stringent performance requirements in order to get paid means that not only is job satisfaction a lot less, but you also have to worry about basic economic survival even as you're helping a client despite themselves.

The fact is, contractors and consultants are in fact if not legally "virtual employees". There is no escape from this "virtual employee" role other than developing and selling a standardized product.

Bored Bystander
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

I want to start my own business because...
I want the amount of my compensation decoupled from the hours of effort I put in.

WHile the start-up phase may be pure hell, if you make it through to being a business you get paid based on the quality/popularity of your product - not how many hours you put in.

There's an upper limit of hours you can work, but there is no such limit on how popular your product can be. What to you think BillG makes per hour?

Obvoiusly, I don't consider consulting/contract work to be "having a business" - it is being self-employed, which is a different animal.

Laying the groundwork
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Sadly, Bored Bystander is more right than he is wrong - at least when you're talking about servicing the SMB (small/medium business) market.  SMB client's don't always understand the business benefit, or even that there IS a business benefit.  They tend to take on technology projects because they feel they have to.

Servicing Fortune 500 clients is much different.  You're dealing by and large with people who understand exactly what the business benefit of your service is.

A large part of my SMB work goes like this:  A client will request a proposal.  I provide a proposal.  They claim I'm too expensive.  They hire some kid who's been in the industry less than a year, because he works for $25 an hour.  Four months later, with the project hopelessly off track, over budget, and no functional software in sight, they call me in to fix the project, which takes orders of magnutude more effort and money than if they had simply showed a little faith and let me build it right the first time.

I don't take it personally, and I don't get mad.  They don't know how software projects work - how could they?  They run body shops and real estate brokerages and mobile home dealerships.  They should no more be expected to understand how a software project should work than I should be expected to understand how to run a body shop, real estate brokerage or mobile home dealership.

Once they've made the initial costly mistake, they realize that you really can't get the same level service from a 1-year guy that you can get from a 10-year guy.  And once they see that a) I'm not out to take advantage of them, and b) I can deliver results, they don't question me anymore, and they don't try to undercut me anymore.  They eventually learn what kind of business benefit a good professional can provide.

The larger clients are much, much easier to deal with on the front end because they know the business benefit of what they're asking for before they even pick up the phone to call you.  Plus they have sufficient resources that once they've cvommitted to a project, it gets done.

But the SMB market is vital, and they need services.  Tougher to deal with?  Sure.  But if you've got the patience to form some relationships and teach SMB clients why things need to be done a certain way, you can build a business entirely around them.  And I think that is pretty cool.

www.ChristopherHawkins.com
Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Christopher, you make a very interesting point. Given patience and time I am sure that I could crack the SMB market.

Here is one conceptual issue, though. SMBs are often where they are in size because their owners avoid making the kind of wise decisions that would favor working with an experienced professional. They want their employees to be as cheap as possible, they look for the cheapest vendor, etc.

IE: if they didn't pettily nickel and dime every decision, they wouldn't be small.

This short term type thinking, IMO, combined with the paranoia and pettyness of some small biz owners, makes them the least desirable type of customer that I can imagine.

So I guess it's a numbers game. Market to enough small businesses that you can choose the best customers and not have to work with the idiots.

Bored Bystander
Thursday, July 22, 2004

The phrase you're looking for is "stepping over dollars to pick up dimes" and yes, unfortunately a lot of small businesses do have that kind of modus operandi.

I try to avoid the ones who 100% will look for the lowest price without weighing any other factors.  If a prospect is at least interested in doing a project in such a way that it will end up being effective and impacting the bottom line positively, I"m willing to work with them - even if they only come around after making the costly mistake of hiring an amateur first.

To be honest, I'd spend all my time with my Fortune 500 clients if I could - I just don't have enough of them.  They tend to do things in big pops and then lie dormant for a while, whereas the SMB clients provide constant, but small trickles of work.

It's not a bad balance if you can strike it.  Nobody ever said it would be easy.  ;)

www.ChristopherHawkins.com
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Anyone interested in doing marketing for a Software and web development company "Unovoid Softwares and Web developement hosting and custom applications" www.unovoid.com.


Visit the site

www.unovoid.com and contact the CEO

Vijay Saki

Unovoid Softwares and Web Developers

Unovoid Vijay Saki
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Anyone interested in doing marketing for a Software and web development company "<a href="www.unovoid.com">UNOVOID Softwares and Web Development hosting and custom applications" </a>www.unovoid.com.


Visit the site

<a href="www.unovoid.com">UNOVOID Softwares and Web Development</a> and contact the CEO

Vijay Saki

<a href="www.unovoid.com">UNOVOID Softwares and Web Development</a>

Unovoid Vijay Saki
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Why is that in this thread?

Aaron F Stanton
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Can I gt some eggs and coffee to go with that SPAM?

Norrick
Thursday, July 22, 2004

Unovoid's web site looks like typical SPAM bullshit with "bla bla bla bla we are bla bla bla experts in <torrent of breathless alphabet soup skills all run together>", except that it provides the following intriguing pair of contact addresses:

509, Ridge View Dr, Nicholasville, KY,USA.

Plot No.1, Bharani Colony, Diwakar Street, Saligramam, Chennai - 600 093, India.

I have no problem with someone trying to get ahead but c'mon. This is like selling ice cube makers to eskimos.

Bored Bystander
Friday, July 23, 2004

Its not a spam I am sorry if this message disturbed your forum. But that was a connection problem.!

Thank You

Vijay Saki

Unovoid Softwares

Vijay Saki
Saturday, July 24, 2004

I want(ed) to start my own business because...

..when I was working for my old employer, I was aware of the annoyances and some stupid things my employer was doing...

but I wasn't yet aware of all the annoyances I would suffer and stupid things I would do in my own business!

Nobody's Perfect
Tuesday, July 27, 2004

I dont think you will be annoyed as long you love your business!!!!

www.unovoid.com

Vijay Saki

Unovoid Softwares and Web Development

Vijay Saki
Wednesday, July 28, 2004

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