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Free syntax highlighting editors?

Hi -

I'm hoping to find some info on syntax sensitive editors, particularly extensible ones.  I know about emacs, vi, Eclipse, but was wondering if anyone has any suggestions.

I'm looking basically for editors that with can accomodate new lnaguages with a configuration file that is read in at runtime.

(Oh, btw, please don't tell me "Google is your friend."  For things like this it generally isn't.  Too much chaff.  I want opinions.  I dare a search engine to give me that.)

Aaron F Stanton
Monday, July 19, 2004

Syn.

All I use for everything.

SynEdit used to be good but now it sucks.

muppet
Monday, July 19, 2004

I believe SciTE will do what you want:

http://scintilla.sourceforge.net/SciTE.html

check it out
Monday, July 19, 2004

Programmer's Notepad is a nice piece of software.  It's open source and does syntax highlighting:

http://www.pnotepad.org/

Herbert Sitz
Monday, July 19, 2004

vim

hoser
Monday, July 19, 2004

I use SciTe,its nice if minimalistic

I also use ConText, it supports many languages vi 'hilite' files, text files that describe the syntax and effects to be applied.
Also is configurable so you can ivoke other apps, i.e. a compiler, on files and get the results in a output tab.

Honu
Monday, July 19, 2004

www.ultraedit.com

Not free, but cheap - US$35

Haven't tried the newer versions, but earlier versions have always worked well.

Ward
Monday, July 19, 2004

www.pspad.com (freeware)

David Majda
Monday, July 19, 2004

http://www.textpad.com/

John C.
Monday, July 19, 2004

You failed to mention a platform.  For Win32, we use EditPlus.

http://www.editplus.com

Walt
Monday, July 19, 2004

jEdit is free, cross-platform (being written in Java), and purportedly supports syntax highlighting of 90 different file types.

http://jedit.org/

Karl
Monday, July 19, 2004

Crimson editor is the bees knees

http://www.crimsoneditor.com/

Eric Debois
Monday, July 19, 2004

I didn't mention a platform because I have access to several.  However, for completeness, let's limit it to x86 Linux, x86 Win32, and Mac 9.2.2.

Many thanks for the excellent suggestions so far!

Aaron F Stanton
Monday, July 19, 2004

Scite is good. Will autocomplete word based on current document, something missing from lots of other editors. (And it gives you a list of the possibilities rather than cycling through them lamely.) Adding your own highlighters is pretty easy, too, I made one for a scripting language I use in about 30 minutes. (I'm pretty slow, too.)

Don't know if it does Mac, however.

Tom
Monday, July 19, 2004

On any system with X, you should look at NEdit. I have never found anything on Windows to equal it, more's the pity.

Ian
Monday, July 19, 2004

Another Vote for Scite.  If you find it to minimal then you can extend it easily.

Version 2 of Programmers Notepad shares the same Scintilla core, and is also worth a look.

Ged Byrne
Monday, July 19, 2004

Another vote here for jEdit.  I've actually written a syntax definition for it, and modified another one.  It's not difficult at all.

Phillip J. Eby
Monday, July 19, 2004

Somebody wants to rethink the name "SciTE".

This sequence of letters strongly suggests the pronunciation "shite", and conjures up all sorts of associations that I am sure the developers did not intend!

Ian
Monday, July 19, 2004

Interestingly enough, searching on Google for "free syntax sensitive editor extensible" brings up a site with basically every editor mentioned here as the first hit.

Google is not always your friend, but sometimes it works :)

Robert 'Groby' Blum
Monday, July 19, 2004

Ian, see my thread on silly Open Source naming conventions (like PUTTY).

Wayne
Monday, July 19, 2004

How come you don't want to pay for one?  Don't believe programmers should eat?

Lottie
Monday, July 19, 2004

If they're so dumb to depend on writing a text editor for living, they shouldn't.

Egor
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

There's nothing dumb about writing a good text editor, nor about paying for one.

Cognitive Dissonance
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

Writing an editor isn't dumb, betting your business/career on it is, which the poster above asserted. Ask Joel why his product isn't another editor with syntax highlighting.

Egor
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

Try LEO: Literate Editor with Outlining. It's outlining makes sewage dumps of every other mechanism I've ever seen for organising code. Syntax highlighting is curently not too hot, but it's extensible like you'd neevr believe. And quite cost effective ($0, unless you're generous and make a donation).

After using it for a few days a year or so ago I decided not to waste time looking for any other editor.

http://webpages.charter.net/edreamleo/front.html

bah_humbug
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

http://unred.sf.net
using
http://colorer.sf.net  - about 50 languages unicode, structure tree, macros, external commands, full delphi source

Max Belugin (http://belugin.newmail.ru)
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

and _very_ flexible highlighting configuration (event HTML with embeded scripts is configured)

Max Belugin (http://belugin.newmail.ru)
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

Can someone EXPLAIN this Leo thing?  I downloaded it and I don't really get it.  I played around with it for a few minutes and then lost interest.

Not sure why it is so good.  I have heard on the Python newsgroups that it is great and all that.

Anyone try it and NOT like it?

Roose
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

Leo is a great tall for outlining and linking your code, but I don't rate it as a text editor.

The great thing is that you don't have to use it as a text editor.  First you create your outline in Leo, with the skeleton of your code.  Then you open the file in your favourite text editor.

The files generated by Leo contain the outline in the form of comments.  You just make sure these are left untouched.

Then, when you open the project again in Leo, everything is updated automatically.

Heres an example usage:

I have library of functions in a simple basic variant.  I have these contained in an organised set of Leo nodes.  They are then weaved into both main applications and unit test scripts.

When I want to edit these functions, I open up the unit test scripts and test.  The scripts are small and I can run them fast.

Then when I've finished I reopen the project in Leo and it is reweaved, so that the applications are updated with the latest version of the functions.

You can extend this to bug tracking.  Create a new node for the bug and weave the function and a test script together.  Fix the bug in the test script.  When your happy update leo and weave it all back together.

There is a lot you can do with a very simple tool, but it takes a little work to get there.

Ged Byrne
Tuesday, July 20, 2004


sorry, broken link
http://unired.sf.net

Max Belugin (http://belugin.newmail.ru)
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

Amusing that I didn't try Google and this time it would have actually worked in the way I wanted.

As to why I don't want to pay for one - It's not my goal to use the editors.  My goal here is to find ones I can write add-ins for.  I want to expand my skills by practicing in a very specific way with variations on a theme.

I fully believe in paying for software.  I really don't like software pirating, as people may or may not have noticed from posts of mine elsewhere.

Aaron F Stanton
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

"Writing an editor isn't dumb, betting your business/career on it is, which the poster above asserted. Ask Joel why his product isn't another editor with syntax highlighting."

A few things:

1) I didn't assert that betting your business/career on writing an editor was a dumb thing.  (That's quite a sentence you put together there.  You may want to read it again.)

2) The folks who created UltraEdit seem to be doing quite well, and for good reason.  They wrote a terrific editor and provide great support. 

3) Why should I care why Joel hasn't created an editor with syntax highlighting?  He hasn't opened a coffee shop, either, but Starbucks seems to be doing OK.

Cognitive Dissonance
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

For a real programmer's editor take a look at Zeus for Windows:

  http://www.zeusedit.com/lookmain.html

Jussi Jumppanen
Tuesday, July 20, 2004

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