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Google could compete with MS Exchange

It can't be long before some offices beg Google to give them a Gmail platform for their office mail.  Google could then expand the features Gmail has, with calendars and contacts and what not, and in no time Exchange has another major competitor.

Of course if somewould would send me a G-mail invite I could research this further ;). 

Keith Wright
Friday, July 16, 2004

google doesn't love me.  I was only ever given one gmail invite to give out.

muppet
Friday, July 16, 2004

A lot of people seem to think that Google is building a platform, and then building these killer apps on top, GMail being just one of them.

To compete with Exchange I guess you'd need more than just the email/calander stuff, but I can see how this could be feasible, certainly in SME-type environments where a full-blown Exchange implementation would be overkill.

This would be especially attractive if the management could be simplified. Most small businesses don't have time to figure out how complex systems like Exchange work.

Steve Jones (UK)
Friday, July 16, 2004

But I ask, again, how will Google sustain itself on advertising revenue alone? If they keep growing their product base, they must charge a fee, should they not? And if and when they do, would they have achieved a lock-in or will they lose popularity?

KayJay
Friday, July 16, 2004

Not necessarily. As their products become more and more pervasive, they'll have a stronger case to up their advertising charges, potentially increasing their revenues.

Steve Jones (UK)
Friday, July 16, 2004

I was thinking of Corporate GMail being something you pay for to install on your own server, or maybe have the option of Google hosting it for you, again for a fee.

If they want to, they can probably make a little money just by charging to have anything other than gmail.com as the email domain, even for all of us little guys.

Keith Wright
Friday, July 16, 2004

But they don't charge a fixed price for their advertising, advertisers bid on adverts and the highest (ish) bidder gets their adverts displayed. If they are displaying more adverts because they are offering more services then the clickthrough rate will drop and the amount advertisers are willing to bid will drop.

Their opportunity for growth is to signup more advertisers, I can't see how spreading their adverts over additional services helps unless they grow the number of advertisers.

Tony Edgecombe
Friday, July 16, 2004

"google doesn't love me.  I was only ever given one gmail invite to give out."

You can buy one on ebay for next to nothing.

lh
Friday, July 16, 2004

I don't know if this will happen, but Google could offer GMail in a similar way that they offer their intranet search appliance: http://www.google.com/appliance/

Google could offer a "GMail Appliance" (you supply the storage, heh) with the software for installation at a corporation.

Luke
Friday, July 16, 2004

do you think that any company put their whole stuff on google? company emails, etc? come'n


Friday, July 16, 2004

I was thinking the same sort of thing as Luke, a Gmail-Box.

As for hosting on Google, I know a lot of companies who would be better off with all of their stuff hosted by Google.  Google probably looses a lot less data than the average company.

Do you really feel secure with all your data in some Microsoft product?  Google really has to concentrate on reliability because it means real money to them.  Microsoft has not had to make that one of their top concerns, they have always been able to push the mantra that you should back up your data regularly.

Keith Wright
Friday, July 16, 2004

BTW, some kind soul has now hooked me up with a gmail account, thanks! 

Keith Wright
Friday, July 16, 2004

You are more than welcome, Keith. I just like to help fellow JOS members, whenever I can. :)

Anon
Friday, July 16, 2004

"This would be especially attractive if the management could be simplified. Most small businesses don't have time to figure out how complex systems like Exchange work. "

The beauty here is that with ONE verion they could address ALL MARKET SEGMENTS.  They can service the low tier home user (with advertising supported revenue), the small business owner (who doesn't want to manage IIS and Exchange server) and bulk licenses to corporate accounts.

Mr. Analogy
Friday, July 16, 2004

Why don't they let people use Gmail interface to access  corporate IMAP accounts. Emails are not stored on Google servers, but on your own servers. But you can use the Gmail interface to access corporate emails, instead of Outlook. Google can still make money by supplying ads.

Anon
Friday, July 16, 2004

It makes sense that a big vendor like Google with the network platform could address spam more directly. Their hurdle is convincing company IT heads that they can trust Google.

Big corporates are still grappling with using outsourced network software, but they are coming around.

Can someone hook me up with a GMail account ;)

Patrick FitzGerald
Friday, July 16, 2004

I do not think Google selling g-mail to bussiness is an exciting idea. For one thing, thousands of ISPs already offer hosting bussiness e-mails on the web. It does not take much to put up a web based e-mail interface.  Yahoo is doing this already. I do not have the numbers but probably not the same amount of money google makes from advertisement. Google eventually is going to running into the problem yahoo had: how to diversify it's revenue streams.

I host my own web mails.
Friday, July 16, 2004

Just a little note on Gmail's interface. It's not like any other web email's interface. They done a really good job. Once you start using it a lot, you will realize it. It's actually chaged the way I use Email. Infact, I like it even better than Outlook.

Anon
Friday, July 16, 2004

"Do you really feel secure with all your data in some Microsoft product?"

You ever try debating without using FUD? No, seriously - like, arguing with facts and statistics and stuff?

You should try it; it's actually fairly challenging, but people often listen to you longer if you can speak more than two sentences without an ad hominem.

Just my $.02.

Philo

Philo
Friday, July 16, 2004

As GMail expands, their ad revenue will expand. Remember, it's Pay Per Click. The more email accounts, the more emails, the more clicks. It's very simple, actually. It's like saying "How will Google make money as they take over the Search Engine market and more and more people search on Google?"

www.MarkTAW.com
Saturday, July 17, 2004

FUD is an industry disease, and one that Microsoft isn't innocent of using themselves when its suited them.  It's hardly surprising that they themselves get burned by it.

That said, I'm not sure I'd trust any offsite provider with my data, whether they had a silly name or not.  Which doesn't mean I'd use Exchange, there are simpler solutions to do the same things.

Netscape used to provide similar services, Calendar, Email, Resource planning etc, etc.

Offsite mail storage and the like suffers from the same problem as all such web services, if its dependant on being connected it will neither be universally trusted nor will it seem preferable to managing it locally.

Those web services that do succeed are those that provide data to clients, weather, mapping, etc.

Simon Lucy
Saturday, July 17, 2004

I think the really big thing here is that managers love big names.  Microsoft is a huge name, and so managers trusted Microsoft solutions.  Now Microsoft's reputation is tarnishing, IT shops are starting to move away from Microsoft on the big security holes: email and web browsing.  Well, no one on the net has a better reputation now than Google, and Google now has a web mail app that kicks butt.  I think many managers at this point would poop their pants to replace their microsoft email with g-mail.  And Google could either host it for you, or sell you a g-mail box to install on your own rack.

As for data reliability, there is no place less reliability than the average small and midsized business server room.  What percent of companies do think have an offsite backup?  Or any backup at all?

Keith Wright
Monday, July 19, 2004

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