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.net, the equivalent of MS Bob.
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Swiss cheese I tell ya

MIke
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Can someone tell me how .net can be compared to MS Bob?

One is a development platform for programmers and the other was a UI to assist simpleton users who couldn't figure out the Windows GUI.

Steve Jones (UK)
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Precisely.  You've struck it exactly.

muppet
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

> Can someone tell me how .net can be compared to MS Bob?
One is a development platform to assist simpleton programmers who couldn't figure out the Windows API and the other was a UI to assist simpleton users who couldn't figure out the Windows GUI. ;-)

Bob's your uncle
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Ah, and so C is a language for simpleton programmers who can't understand assembler, and C++ is a language for simpleton programmers who can't understand C, and Java is a language for simpleton programmers who can't understand C++.

MX
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Of course, asm is just for simpletons who can't do straight machine code.  And machine code is for the simpletons who aren't fast enough to throw the register dip switches on the front panel fast enough to keep up with the clock rate.

Ben Allison
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

And throwing the register dip switches on the front panel fast enough to keep up with the clock rate is for the simpletons who aren't evolved enough to do so via telekinesis.

Brainiac
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

.net, the equivalent of MS Bob.

Because in three years no one will be using it and everyone will think it was a joke.  Think I'm wrong?  Well then why isn't it installed on most Windows machines?

.net, the equivalent of MS Bob.
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Because most Windows machines don't have any apps on them that require it. If they did, they would have. Besides developers, no one will download and install the .NET Framework unless they need it - why else would they?

The size of the framework makes it an unattractive download for small software companies, and large software houses are always slow to change platforms - they have a major investment in C++ or old-style VB or Delphi to protect.

.NET is already making major inroads in the server market - as I'm sure you know, Windows Server 2003 has .NET preinstalled - where it's used for ASP.NET and n-tier apps. Just like Java.

Meantime, Microsoft is engaged in countless projects to rewrite or extend a large proportion of its software catalogue in managed code. Longhorn may well not be with us until 2007, but it will contain more managed code (mostly in C#) than you can shake a stick at. Office 12 is highly likely to have managed code in it - and will thus ship with the Framework on the DVD. This is clearly a long-haul strategy.

If you really think MS is going to abandon managed code and the CLR, you're really really really dumb. Where have you been for the last twoyears?

.NET Fan
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

"NET preinstalled - where it's used for ASP.NET and n-tier apps."

Which version.  The first version, the second iteration, the third try?  What.  The fact is J2EE is a lot more mature.  There really isn't a need for .NET.  The enterprise computing world essentially says "hey great, you made something we wanted 4 years ago, it's new and rapidly morphing.  We've already invested in J2EE.  You're too late."

Yes MS does need a managed code environment.  Could have had a decent one a long time ago if they didn't try to shit on Java.

.net, the equivalent of MS Bob.
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

MS Bob - a sure-fire winner.

http://toastytech.com/guis/bob.html
http://home.pmt.org/~drose/aw-win3x-16.html

TheGeezer
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

just think of all those 100s of MS developers that worked on Bob, and for what? a wasted few years of their lives. they probably worked overtime, got yelled at by bosses, stressed out over deadlines, fought with coworkers .... and for what? for that ridiculous piece of shiite. surely the developers knew it was ridiculous when they were creating it. i wonder if anyone spoke up? what a waste.

josheli
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

s/100/1000/
s/Bob/.Net/

Unix guy
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Somehow I find it more likely that a couple of people worked on MS Bob. Only one guy worked on Managed DirectX, so that's feasible don't you think?

Nathan Ridley
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

I don't think we'll ever find out how many people worked on MS Bob. Not that it matters of course.

Still, you could bet they pi$$ed away plenty of money on it...

TheGeezer
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

"There really isn't a need for .NET."

Anybody who thinks the J2EE world is a rosy world of bliss is either self-medicated, or has never actually done REAL work in J2EE. Anybody who thinks that any of the J2EE vendors are nearly as seamless and powerful in their support of Windows platform vs. .NET is obviously a troll.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Regarding the original post, I got the joke. I guess it went over everyone else's head?

Dr. Frederick Johaness
Thursday, July 15, 2004

This board gets more like poetry every day.

Dr. Frederick Johaness
Thursday, July 15, 2004

"Which version.  The first version, the second iteration, the third try?  What.  The fact is J2EE is a lot more mature.  There really isn't a need for .NET.  The enterprise computing world essentially says "hey great, you made something we wanted 4 years ago, it's new and rapidly morphing.  We've already invested in J2EE.  You're too late."

Wow. Company releases more than one version of program. Film at eleven. Or did you forget that Java is into its fifth major release now? Which, I gather, is going to rejoice in the fabulous name of 'Java 2 Enterprise Edition 5 JDK 1.5.1' or something similar. Now I know you're trolling.

J2EE has a head start, naturally, because it's been around for longer. I'm not sure it's any more 'mature' though. And, despite Java's notional cross-platform nature, it is generally the case that Java = some flavour of Unix, particularly in the enterprise space. I know of very few people running Java back-ends on Windows servers. In the Windows world, .NET is taking off in a big way. My company has no shortage of customers queuing up to have enterprise-level systems built in .NET. We can't hire developers fast enough. Our Java-on-Windows team, meanwhile, consists of one person.

You clearly have a rather distorted view of reality.

.NET Fan
Thursday, July 15, 2004

"Java = some flavour of Unix, particularly in the enterprise space"

Sanity  = some flavour of Unix, particularly in the enterprise space

.net, the equivalent of MS Bob.
Thursday, July 15, 2004

"I know of very few people running Java back-ends on Windows servers. In the Windows world, .NET is taking off in a big way."

And that is exactly what it is doing: changing the Windows API from Win32 to .Net, but that goes only for existing Windows shops. The problem on fora like these is that most people only can report on the environment they work in. My company builds and maintains J2EE apps, so my tendency is to think the whole world uses Java (I'm perfectly aware that the world does not, but from where I'm standing I can't see that clearly).

The people Philo was talking about might bne in the same situation. A little suggestive question might help to skew their answers too. "Hey, I work for MS, how happy are you with our fantastic .Net environment?"

To me, .Net comes into view once it has found its way to Solaris. That will be quite some time, I guess. In the meantime I try to keep tabs on the ongoing developments.

Besides: a Java-on-Windows team is something I've never heard of, unless you are talking about that weird Java bastard child that MS created.

Say cheese
Friday, July 16, 2004

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