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Noise Reduction..

Has anyone got a recommendation for a decent noise reducer (s/w on WinXP). I make some music at home and would like to know if anyone has any recommendations, I have tried adobe audition (trial) I am thoroughly impressed by what it can do but the full version comes for a full $300, out of reach (atleast for now). I was told about audacity from the sourceforge group, experiences anyone ?

Thanks in advance

I blow my own trumpet..er.. flute :)
Monday, July 12, 2004

You must be very flexible. :-P

Wisea**
Monday, July 12, 2004

Eh... warez it up? *ducks*

meep
Monday, July 12, 2004

For the cost, you might as well get an external noise reduction unit, like a HUSH silencer, or just get a piece of mastering software (the makers of Cool Edit probably make mastering software too).  It's probably cheaper and better to get an external noise reduction unit.  Even Cool Edit Pro can do some serious digital NR.

sir_flexalot
Monday, July 12, 2004



You didn't mention using your computer in the process of music making. In that case, turn your PC off.  If your ears are good enough to hear the high-pitch noise of your ATX power supply, then unplug the power cable too! 

dude
Monday, July 12, 2004


By the way, audacity is NOT for noise reduction. However, it is decent for what it does (edit sound files).

dude
Monday, July 12, 2004

Sorry for the third post. I just got what you meant!  :)

Audacity's noise reduction algorithm is OK. It first asks you to define the background noise and then uses that to eliminiate noise from your sound file. As I said, it's OK, but I don't think it is good for professional music making.

dude
Monday, July 12, 2004

Duct tape works well.

Should be working
Monday, July 12, 2004

I think you really shouldn't be messing with noise reduction software if you are making music at home.  Sure, there's using a fancy noise-gate on the signal to roll off the quiet parts, but remember, errors accumulate and reduce the fidelity of your signal.

You really need to examine what's creating the noise.  Turn off the AC while you record, switch to an LCD display (CRTs cause noise in things like guitar pickups), replace your power supply and fans with quieter versions, etc.

Flamebait Sr.
Monday, July 12, 2004

Place your CPU unit behind a wall. So it can merrily make all the noise it wants in the next room. Poke a hole so the sound card dongle, USB devices, and digital video cable can connect to the peripherals in your recording studio. If the wall is doing it's job properly (you can pad it furthur) it should get rid of hums, not sure about the high pitch whines common in hard drives and cpu fans though. I would even recommend building a thick CPU cabinet with plywood but that's a lot of work and could (most likely--even) damage your PC by overheating the components. If you create a air flow within such a cabinet with sound cancellation in mind quiet fans can be added to the cabinet. I would recommend quieter PC parts except they add up and most studios needs more than one PC anyway so cabinets are the way to go.

Li-fan Chen
Monday, July 12, 2004

How about if the noise is because you are moving songs from old records onto CDs? You won't be able to just not record the sound, its already there.

Steamrolla
Monday, July 12, 2004

Thanks for all the input folks, I do admit, for ideal results the recording room has to be made noise free and I should use the most sensitive mic and I should have the best sound card.  I've made a note of all of these and hope to have a better recording session next time. Thanks to all again. But my question was about the .WAV I already have recorded.

For whatever it is worth, I have made some passable music I wish I could make it available for folks out here to listen to it and comment on the signal quality. Probably I can send the link to my Y! briefcase to those who're interested in music from a bamboo flute and get your opinions on what can be made to this one. Anyone interested ? ( volunteers ? ).

I blow my own trumpet..er.. flute :)
Tuesday, July 13, 2004

What color is your trumpet? Pink?

Dennis Atkins
Tuesday, July 13, 2004

Go in to the spectral viewer & check out what frequency bands are constantly represented - that's your background noise.

Then go in to your EQ module & BOOST a narrow bandwidth & sweep until you hear the background noise in a very pronounced way. Then CUT that frequency.

www.MarkTAW.com
Tuesday, July 13, 2004

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