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Reading glasses

And now for something completely different, seeing as how I'm evidently too stupid to drive a mouse....

I've decided I need reading glasses.  I don't want regular reading glasses.  My boxers have aliens, rubber ducks, $100 dollar billls, etc on them.  My shirts equally outlandish.  So I want reading glasses to fit the rest of my clothes.

So, outside of the local drugstore, where is a good place to find reading glasses?

And, uhhh, to stay on topic I'll write a PHP script using a .NET client to populate a javascript gui to help me select.

Snotnose
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

How about reading glasses like Steve Jobs has.  (Or whatever kind of glasses he always wears).

Mr. Analogy
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Where is a good place to find reading glasses?

Umm... a glasses store?  There's like billions of them out there, and YES, they do supply reading glasses.

-T.J.

T.J.
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

The phrase "reading glasses" should be tossed out, and use "eyeglasses" instead. So what that one is near sighted and one is far sighted. Go to a doctor and get lenses that exactly match you, in frames that exactly match your style. Sure, you'll pay more than the generic crap things at the drug store, but well tended frames can last a long, long time. Your eyes will be thankful for proper care, too (and, let's not forget that your eye doctor can detect early diseases and properly treat them!).

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

you have rubber ducks and aliens on your boxers, and you consider that outlandish.

You should consider getting out more.

muppet from forums.madebymonkeys.net
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

I'm married, I don't need to get out more :)

Snotnose
Thursday, July 08, 2004

1. Find an optometrist.

2. Get your eyes tested and find out what prescription you really need. Each eye may be different, you may have issues like astigmatism that can be corrected, etc. (Tell the optometrist you plan to use them for working on the computer or whatever and s/he can take that into consideration.)

3. Pick out a pair of frames from the selection of hundreds that the optometrist will invariably carry. You can find stuff that's as conservative or as outrageous as you like.

The end result is you get a pair of glasses tailored for your specific vision needs that meet whatever fashion goals you may have. My last set of glasses (including the eye exam and all the bells and whistles) cost something like $800 retail; I paid less than half that out of pocket, thanks to company vision-care plan discounts. That number is likely on the high end, but I was willing to splurge for something I'd be wearing very prominently every day for a couple of years. To me, it's a bit like spending the extra money to get a decent chair for programming instead of some $50 piece of junk.

John C.
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Hmmm, my boxers are Bart Simpson and Scoobie Doo but then I buy my reading glasses at the drug store ~ F#$k how they look. You don't *sound* vain.

Mr. E Lurker
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Why not try your local blacksmith?

Jimmy Jo-jo
Thursday, July 08, 2004

ROFL - knock the bottoms off some pop bottles and have him forge them into a wrought-iron thing of beauty.

Mr. E Lurker
Thursday, July 08, 2004

I would not get your rubber duck boxer shorts out in public, this would occasion more grief than the opthalmic consequences of age.

You need to have your eyes tested, do that before deciding the actual outlandish ornamentation to hang on your proboscular protrusion.

Simon Lucy
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Get the eyes tested.

It all depends what country you are in; in every country I've lived in outside the UK the eyetest costs nothing and the cost of photo-sensitive prescription bifocals plus frame has come to around $150.

Might be cheaper to take a short holiday abroad to buy the glasses there if you're being asked $800.

Stephen Jones
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Singapore is an excellent place to have the test and buy glasses.

Simon Lucy
Thursday, July 08, 2004

What about trying those laser eye operation?

Garibald
Thursday, July 08, 2004

I second Mr. E Lurker but use Dom Perignon bottles... you will get your outlandish look but with bit more of prestige

Sir Elton John
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Horn-rimmed contact lenses.

With a round-the-head strap to keep 'em in.

Edward
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Laser surgery won't help him, most likely.  People need reading glasses generally because the muscles that control your eyeball focusing get worn out, and don't do the focusing as well.  So shaving off part of the cornea isn't going to change how weak or strong your eye-focusing muscle is.

nathan
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Awww... but lasers!!

muppet from madebymonkeys.net
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Actually, in many cases the eyes don't focus as well because the muscles have atrophied from lack of use.  Many people who get glasses find that quite rapidly they need to get new ones on a regular basis.  I made a conscious decision in highschool to not do that, and even though my eyes have dropped to about 20/40, they did that very early (as in, while I was in highschool) and have stayed that way for about 20 years.

Now, how that relates to reading glasses as compared to everyday glasses...beats me.  Just thought I'd throw in my $.02.

Oh, and if you're matching your glasses to your boxers and don't get out much anyway...nevermind, I don't know where I was going with that.

Aaron F Stanton
Thursday, July 08, 2004

Heh.  I knew that would be a fun way to ask the question.

I only have trouble reading CD booklets, which I can live without, and large schematics shrunk down to fit 8.5"x11" paper.  Books, magazines, and my screen are fine.

BTW, I got lasered 2 years ago.  I got monovision, where they make one eye good for distance, the other for closeup.  Works better than it sounds.  So if I'm going to wear reading glasses more than a few minutes at a time I'll need a prescription, but I'm not there yet.

So now how many of you mentally associate 'snotnose' with the Fark mustard man wearing boxers with pink elephants?

Snotnose
Thursday, July 08, 2004

"I got monovision, where they make one eye good for distance, the other for closeup."

If I'm reading you correctly that means you no longer have good stereo vision at ANY distance -- which means you can't drive a car, for instance. Doesn't sound like a great idea to me!

Chris Nahr
Friday, July 09, 2004

"Actually, in many cases the eyes don't focus as well because the muscles have atrophied from lack of use."

Urban myth, at least in part. Eye muscles can indeed become too weak for lack of use (i.e. staring at the same spot all day long without moving your eyes around) but the result is squinting, not near- or far-sightedness.

I know that my eyes were trailing off further and further from each other due to underuse of my eye muscles, and I could fully correct that particular problem by eye muscle training over the course of a year.

However, this training did absolutely nothing for my myopia. Lots of quacks claim that eye training cures myopia but every doctor I've visited told me myopia is due to a deformed eye ball. The focusing muscles work fine, it's just that the baseline is wrong due to the deformation.

Chris Nahr
Friday, July 09, 2004

A great place to get reading glasses      www.4readers.com        Three pair of glasses for $9.99 and good quality

Barry David
Thursday, July 29, 2004

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