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cd burning software for Linux

what is the best, which one are you using ?

Chirak Katilal
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

k3b (http://k3b.org) is pretty nice, is you are looking for a GUI-based burning program...

joev
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

k3b, like so many other Linuix programs, is merely a GUI wrapper around some command line program.

from the k3b web page:

"The actual burning in K3b is done by the command line utilities cdrecord, cdrdao, and growisofs."

Linux is so retarded.

You Don't Want to Know
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

> merely a GUI wrapper around some command line program.

And this is relevant how?

K3B has worked really well for me, and I've never once known or cared that it is was "really" a command-line program underneath.

Portabella
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

I second the k3b recommendation (for the kde desktop). If you have the Gnome desktop, try "File" / "Write to CD" in the file manager. If you want a command line application, use 'cdrecord'.

Jonas B.
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Having the raw functionality in the form of command line apps is not retarded. Its one of the best things about *nix. You can script it, access it over telnet or SSL sessions and avoid redundant work if a gui doesnt suit you or even make a web interface for your headless server.

Eric Debois
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

> Having the raw functionality in the form of command line apps is not retarded. Its one of the best things about *nix.

They are really 2 ways of looking at the world.

From the more Windows-centric viewpoint, having a GUI wrap a command-line program introduces an extra layer -- the abstraction is now leakier, to use a Joelism.

From the Unix-centric viewpoint, not only do you have the scriptability, but the programs can evolve separately. There are more potential points of failure, but also more uses.

Portabella
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

A more correct way of putting this is comparing the Windows way of scripting or calling COM objects, wheras the UNIX crowd believes stdio and | are the nirvana of software integration.

Just me (Sir to you)
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Umm. I personally like the k3b which has worked great for me. I also like it that I can write a script to burn as well. The flexibility that you get in linux is amazing but it does require a certain kind of person.  I use many operating systems but if I could only use one it'd be based on the unix philosophy. Funny how you can always detect that about people.

me
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

"A more correct way of putting this is comparing the Windows way of scripting or calling COM objects, ..."

Which is why you have to instantiate a Window manager just to read a socket.  Nice.

hoser
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Clearly not true. You can access sockets from console apps. You can access sockets from services that don't have any desktop interaction. Both work just fine.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

BTW,

Gnome 2.4 seems to have integrated CD recording into the desktop.

1. Insert blank CD.
2. A "Nautilus" Window get instantiated (analagous to a Windows "FileManager" Window).  This is the CD "target".
3. You can now drag files from other locations into the target CD window.
4. Hit the "burn" button when you've got your target files ready and organized.

Very nice.

cdrecord is a must-have if you're making copies of ISO images

hoser
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Guess I stand corrected. 

hoser
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

JustMe: KDE also has DCOP, which is similar to COM, and allows embedding components into other applications, etc.  This is currently being generalized into something called D-BUS, which will allow better application integration with the desktop.  GNOME and KDE (and anything else that chooses to implement it) will use D-BUS in the future.  This also means that components are easily scriptable, something that is really handy in the Unix world.  Windows has WSH, but I don't think I've ever seen it used in the real world.

http://freedesktop.org/Software/dbus

As for k3b being a wrapper for underlying utilities, please see Joel's essay "Things You Should Never Do, Part I".

http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000069.html

joev
Wednesday, July 07, 2004

I liked k3b in the limited time I played with it, but I also found that learning to use cdrecord was rewarding and occasionally handy.

I can't comment intelligently on whether the Unix paradigm demonstrates that, "UNIX crowd believes stdio and | are the nirvana of software integration," but , FWIW, I read an interesting tutorial in an recent issue of MSDN on creating console apps.  The first half of the article was sort of an evangelism on the joys of, and Microsoft's rediscovery of the command line.

I think surely there are good circumstances justifying both.

OffMyMeds
Thursday, July 08, 2004

joev,

I believe the UNIX world has reinvented components a number of times. It just seems that the UNIX philosophy ignores these in favor of old stdio and | .
Automation makes components available to a wide scripting audience. Most environments, script or otherwise, can interact with COM components.

Just me (Sir to you)
Thursday, July 08, 2004

> It just seems that the UNIX philosophy ignores these in favor of old stdio and | .
Automation makes components available to a wide scripting audience. Most environments, script or otherwise, can interact with COM components.

COM components are fairly hard to get right, though. Like memory management in C++, it can be done, and even by ordinary mortals, but it's often done wrong.

stdio and | are, IMO, a lot more robust, and that's why the Unix folks like them so much. If you imagine an environment where, instead of outputting just byte streams, you send back XML (or other structured data), you have very powerful  integration tools.  Don't take my word for it; look at where enterprise integration is today. It ain't happening via COM.

In short, Just Me, you seem to understand the pitfalls of the Unix way well enough, but not any of its advantages.

Portabella
Thursday, July 08, 2004

I actually do agree with you. I am a fan of KISS, so the simplicity does appeal to me. It has its limits though. The right tool for the right job ...

Just me (Sir to you)
Friday, July 09, 2004

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