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Answered his own question?

From an interview with Bill Gates in the current issue of Scientific American:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?articleID=0005930F-3978-10AE-B97883414B7FFE9F&chanID=sa008


SA: Are enough people going into the computer sciences?

BG: That was the big theme of my recent tour to colleges throughout the U.S. It's a paradox that this is the most exciting time in computer science and these are the most interesting jobs...

And yet the number of people going in has gone down, and it's hard to measure whether we are getting the best and brightest. There is this huge disparity. We're getting the best and brightest in China and India, and the numbers are just going up there.

Tom H
Friday, June 25, 2004

What a load of crap.  "We hire Indian and Chinese developers because American developers aren't educated."

it's backhanded PR.

muppet from madebymonkeys.net
Friday, June 25, 2004

I think he was aiming more for the "From the folks we find in India and China, we get *their* best and brightest."

Greg Hurlman
Friday, June 25, 2004

Tom's right, he answered his own question AFAICS. "[T]he number of people going in has gone down" because people see no future in it, because the jobs are going overseas.


Friday, June 25, 2004

Having been suckered by every major employment fad in the past thirty years (EE, JAG, law, CS), I feel somewhat qualified to answer this... [grin]

Each of those fields has suffered from a sudden surge in demand, followed by a surge in supply, and then a return to normalcy. The problem for those in it for the long haul is twofold:
1) It is difficult to look back past the surge in demand to what was truly "normal" when judging the present. For CS, job availability and salaries in 1998 were NOT "normal." I'm pretty sure that pre-dotcom people had to network and meet people and dig for jobs just as they do now. But since that was almost ten years ago, it's hard to remember (and many people weren't even in the field then - for them the phone always rang ten minutes after posting a resume on Monster)
2) The "shake up" of the massive rise in demand, the huge influx of newbies, and the sudden departure of a large number of people has had the effect of shaking a snow globe - even though things are settling down, they're "different." Perception is reality, and everyone's perspective of the field has changed.

I know that I just went to what was to me a minor trade show, yet the floor was packed with vendors (US vendors), many of them are growing, and many of them are looking for good people. I got two calls from recruiters last week, one of which pulled my year-old resume from their database.

I also see work that needs to be done - there are opportunities out there, and there is money to be made.

I cannot tell you "call this person and you'll get a job for life" but I'm pretty sure that sitting at home whining about outsourcing will not achieve that result, either. [grin]

Philo

Philo
Friday, June 25, 2004

In the mid 1970s, I was in math grad school and the calculus classes where stuffed full of pre-medical students, many of whom did not seem bright.


Now we have the prospects for doctors, while very good, hardly seeming like the sort to justify the many years of study for most people.

double dot
Friday, June 25, 2004

best brightest and cheapest

Thanks Microsoft
Friday, June 25, 2004

I am biased but I totally agree with Philo. I moved from Toronto to New York in 2001, just before the bubble burst. What surprised me about the NYC job seekers, compared with the Toronto, was the fact that they really expected to be brought to interviews by limo, taken out to lunch and get hired. I can't recall seeing such things in Toronto, where always the job seeking process involved a lot of networking and was basically an 8-hour a day job by itself. What is happening now looks just like normal to me.

coresi
Friday, June 25, 2004

"Having been suckered by every major employment fad "

No MBA? Looks like you missed one Philo, but it's never too late...

If I read this right, about half of Microsoft's research staff is already in China.

http://research.microsoft.com/aboutmsr/labs/

Tom H
Friday, June 25, 2004

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