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Today was a slow day in India

"Today was a slow day in India.

Only 163 new jobs requiring Java development experience were created on MonsterIndia.com - today (of the well over 5000 current openings).

Most of the positions were paying around $12,000 USD annually.

Today was a slow day in India. Perhaps things will pick up tomorrow."


from http://schneider.blogspot.com/archives/2004_06_20_schneider_archive.html#108802498123947131

Imagine the quality Java code these people are going to pump out over the comming months (I do not imply Indians can't do Java, it is just that when there are such shortages, one can't be very selective)

Just me (Sir to you)
Thursday, June 24, 2004

Java will just get a reputation for being a "bad" technology, and non-technical project management will switch to something else.  Maybe they'll try the Phillippines instead of India.  Anything's better than paying those greedy, fat cat American developers.

muppet is now from madebymonkeys.net
Thursday, June 24, 2004

You know it's kind of funny to sit back and watch from a distance. 

In the US you will if you want to do .net or J2EE you will be working for a small amount of companies.  Either small companies or ones that think it's more important to have jobs in the US than save every last penny.

Might be a good time to go into technological niches.  Throw away that learn .net in a day and get the big bucks book.

Software Assurance
Thursday, June 24, 2004

I want to see what course they're taking, so I can write an intelligent agent that "takes" the course and passes, and thus can code as well as the average "connect A to B" coder.  I mean, I can invent A in the first place, so I ought to be able to create a program that can make other programs go from A to B.  Then everyone can just pay me to license that thing, and all this outsourcing nonsense can stop.  Anyone want to get on board with that?

Devin
Thursday, June 24, 2004


Just like what happened in the dotcom boom here...

People who aren't qualified to wipe a monitor clean will be called "developers" and the rest of us will be cleaning up their code for years to come...

KC
Thursday, June 24, 2004

We have 4 Indian residents onsite doing out source work for us.  Extremely capable people, and they are not cheap.

Simply put, we wanted to hire Java experts locally, only found 1 interested in working for a small company.

hoser
Thursday, June 24, 2004


No one was saying that *all* Indian developers are bad.  That's just a dumb statement.


The point is that when demand is incredibly high, people who aren't qualified are pulled into service.  Like people who've only ever programmed in VB and read a "Java in 24 hours" book and now think they're a developer.


Oh wait, that was me about 4 years ago...

KC
Thursday, June 24, 2004

> We have 4 Indian residents onsite doing out source work for us.  Extremely capable people, and they are not cheap.

hoser, weren't you saying your work environment is dreadful and your leaving it?


Thursday, June 24, 2004

Hoser,

If you looking for Java guys, I'd be interested.  Drop me an email and I'll send you my resume.

KC
Thursday, June 24, 2004

"We have 4 Indian residents onsite doing out source work for us.  Extremely capable people, and they are not cheap."

The onsite developers are usually taken from the best of the outsourcing vendor's staff.  They aren't cheap because you're paying US-level contractor rates for them.

India is going through its own tech boom now, so there will be lots of untalented and untrained people hired just to fill the seats with warm bodies.  Just like dotcom, they will likely have their own meltdown in the next 3-5 years when clients get frustrated with the declining quality.  Then it will scale back and stabilize.  It's the typical hype-peak-crash-stabilize business cycle for any new trend.

NoName
Thursday, June 24, 2004

It's actually different from the dot com boom, and worse.

IT in India is seen as lucrative and as a passport to overseas, so it attracts the most ambitious and, how can we put this, the most ethically challenged.

A lot of the guys in outsourcer firms are the guys who, in America, would have done MBA's. Quite often, but not always, they don't have the same interest or aptitude for software, but instead are much more interested in getting promoted to middle and upper management.

Subbie
Thursday, June 24, 2004

Developers in the US have never developed anything worth paying for. All the truely worthwhile software and hardware innovations have always come from overseas and always will. It's not worth paying extra for american made garbage. Look at the Finnish Linux vs the American BSD -- the american product is seriously substandard comparatively and has won in the market. If it were not for the illegal monopoly of microsoft forcing people to accept a substandard american made product, everyone would have switched to better systems years ago.

Overseas Fatcat
Thursday, June 24, 2004

GET OUT FROM UNDER THAT BRIDGE!!

muppet from forums.madebymonkeys.net
Thursday, June 24, 2004

> Developers in the US have never developed anything worth paying for.

Ba ha haa Ha ha haha. 

christopher baus.net
Thursday, June 24, 2004

Yes, I especially loved that "Finnish Linux" passage. Hilarious.

Bridgebuilder
Friday, June 25, 2004

So some Finnish guy started some Unix clone...I visited Finland last December and I too would do a lot of programming in my spare time if I lived there. There isn't much else to do in Finland in winter.

Herr Herr
Friday, June 25, 2004

> Developers in the US have never developed
> anything worth paying for.

Yeah, those monkeys at BBN never got very far with their "ARPAnet" thingy, did they?  And those guys at Bell Labs with their "C" and their "Unix" - what were THEY thinking?

- former car owner in Queens
Friday, June 25, 2004

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