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Software architect

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/16/technology/16offshore.html

So Microsoft is outsourcing software architects and paying them $180,000 a year.

How do I become a software architect?  Seriously.

Are they great at designing databases?  OOP?  etc.?  What kind of experience do you have to have?  Lead engineer, etc?

Roose
Tuesday, June 15, 2004

Contractors are like prostitutes.  You don't pay them for the job, you pay them to leave when the job's done.

the real world
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

Just leave the money by the bed when you leave dearie.

Simon Lucy
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

Contractors are like prostitutes.  You don't pay them for the job, you pay them to leave when the job's done.

The companies that hire contractors are usually those you want te leave anyway. If they pay for that, even the better.

ignore my ignorance
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

My time to rant, totally off-topic, I expected to click on the link above for an interesting read, it was my fault for not reading the nytimes.com, it is early in the morning, anyway, I get the nytimes please-login-to view this page garbage.  As a matter of fact, most of the pages that I read I cant avoid the blood-sucking please register stuff.  What school of web-development are these people going to where page views require the user to enter personal information.  The data that they collect can't possibly be relevant, do these people actually believe that people on the internet are going to take the time to provide accurate information.  Are they collecting this data and analyzing all this information to make better web-pages?  Not to mention, some people use more than a couple of machines, some people re-install their machines, reset their settings, which means I have to re-type in my information again just to view some article, I probably didnt want to read in the first place.

I could be wrong of course maybe this is the best thing in the world.

Berlin Brown
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

I recently worked on a project to add registration to a newspaper site. It was used to collect basic demographics on users which in turn would increase sales of online advertisements, the main source of revenue. This newspaper had a sizable amount of staff which produced the online content, so I can see why they went this route.

As a user, after understanding everything that went into producing the online site, registration seemed to be a small price to pay for otherwise free content.

jfm424
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

Unfortunately, unlike the established engineering disciplines, anyone can walk around saying that they are a software 'architect'. So, it doesn't mean a whole lot in one sense.

It's not like building architect where you need a specialised qualification and accreditation. In the software business - as it stands - you can say you're an architect and as long as you are convincing, you'd be considered for the job.

My company's definition would be this:
  - 10 years experience
  - Leading medium/large teams
  - Distributed systems experience
  - Heterogenous platforms experience
  - Understands software processes/lifecycles
  - Business domain knowledge
  - OOA, OOD, OOP
  - Proven experience in shipping product to timescale
  - System integration experience

Gaz
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

Except people falsify their data when they sign up for it, deliberately posioning your data. Qhy? Because they can and because you don't have a right to the information you ask for.


Wednesday, June 16, 2004

>Except people falsify their data when they sign up for it, >deliberately posioning your data. Qhy? Because they can >and because you don't have a right to the information >you ask for.

There will always be a percentage of people who falsify data in any survey. Since it’s easier to enter real data instead of fabricated data, this problem is kept to a minimum. That’s why the practice is growing. It works.

I don’t follow the reasoning that a site does not have the right to require registration. It is their content and their choice of what they charge for their goods & services. You cannot march into a store and shop at will without paying the merchant. I don’t know why there is an attitude that just because something is delivered over the medium of the Internet that it’s public domain.

jfm424
Wednesday, June 16, 2004

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