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Windows CVS Clients

I was wondering what people's experiences were with the following CVS projects:

WinCVS
SmartCVS
JSmartCVS
JCVS

Does one stand out from the crowd above all others?  Have you had any particularly good or bad experiences with any of them?  Any good links to reviews would be greatly appreciated.

I'm not looking for information on Subversion, or any other version control system.

Thanks!

Ed
Monday, June 14, 2004

TortoiseCVS stands out.  It's just a shell extension (integrates into Windows explorer) and works great.

Almost Anonymous
Monday, June 14, 2004

Tortoise seconded.  You will need to keep WinCVS around for certain things.

Sassy
Monday, June 14, 2004

Three for TortoiseCVS!

Philo

Philo
Monday, June 14, 2004

Another vote for Tortoise! The hardest part about it is spelling it correctly so you can get to the web site. :-)

There's really only one thing I use WinCVS for anymore - if I've created a bunch of new files scattered all over the place, WinCVS's "flat view" makes it a lot easier to find them all so I can add them.

For everything else, Tortoise is just so much easier and quicker and just works right.

-Chris

Chris Tavares
Monday, June 14, 2004

<threadjack>
All these Windows CVS users, I have to ask: Has anyone else had a problem with cvsnt servers where sometimes commit operations fail unexpectedly, and leave things in a weird state where you can neither commit local files nor check out over them because CVS insists that "up-to-date check failed" for file xxx?

This occurs just after a commit aborts with the report "cannot rename file CVS/Entries.Extra.Backup to CVS/Entries.Extra: Permission denied". This is odd, as permissions are fine, commits work normally 99% of the time, and I'm not running anti-virus or other server processes that would be holding files. I've googled high and low and can't seem to find an explanation for this behavior, but it makes me nervous about whether I can really trust my repository or not...
</threadjack>

John C.
Monday, June 14, 2004

Yes, I've had this problem several times.

All I can say is that CVSNT is great, but running CVS on Linux is much, much less painful.

Most of the time the issue you describe above has to do with:
* user committing files checked out by another user
* using a mapped drive as a sandbox

Also you should use pserver authentication as opposed to any of the windows-related protocols.

Sassy
Monday, June 14, 2004

TortoiseCVS is great! Of course, I mostly use Intellij's built-in CVS, which is great, but only if you're doing Java.

aaabbbccc
Monday, June 14, 2004

Another vote for TortoiseCVS.

If you haven't yet committed to CVS on the server side, you might want to consider Subversion, with the associated turtle - TortoiseSVN.

In the rare occasions that TortoiseCVS doesn't let me do what I want, I use the command line, as it's usually hard (or impossible) to do that within other clients as well.

Ori Berger
Monday, June 14, 2004

Thanks for the feedback folks.  I amaware of Tortoise and had a feeling it was the most popular client.  However, I am specifically looking for feedback on the clients mentioned.  Thanks.

Ed
Monday, June 14, 2004

Another vote for Tortoise but WinCVS is pretty good too.  The client that has caused me more suffering then any other is the PushOk Visual Studio plugin.  Avoid that one like the plague. 

Why is it I wonder that people try to push CVS into the SCC interface when they are very different in style and operation.  A plugin that added a CVS menu (much like tortoise) would be infinitely superior to the tortured plans to try and make CVS act like VSS.

K
Monday, June 14, 2004

If you are just starting with SCM, you should look into subversion. So far, it's been great for me since the switch from CVS.

New window pr0pr0mer
Monday, June 14, 2004

+1 for Tortoise*, and if you are still choosing the SCM system, Subversion over CVS. Both the client and server are better, and Subversion has a non-brain-dead SCC pluin for Visual Studio.

I've used WinCVS, but it's godawful. Barely tolerable, really.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Monday, June 14, 2004

Igloo is a a CVS->VS plugin that works ok (not perfect, but it works better than the native VSS plugin ....). At least on VS6 (No experience with VS.NET)

Ori Berger
Tuesday, June 15, 2004

Someone has to ask the stupid questions.

I once installed Igloo (before having CVSNT). It made the "check in/check out" options available under VS, but other than that, I couldn't check for differences, look for older versions, all the things source control is praised for.

Is it because I didn't have CVS? Now I have that, but Igloo is gone.

I got WinCVS but I couldn't make it work (Might be because I have no idea WHAT it's supposed to do).

Alex
Tuesday, June 15, 2004

For the record, I'm embarrassed I asked that question and will search on my own.

Alex
Tuesday, June 15, 2004


> I once installed Igloo (before having CVSNT). It made
> the "check in/check out" options available under VS,
> but other than that, I couldn't check for differences,
> look for older versions, all the things source control
> is praised for.

If you are after a CVS plugin for the MSVC++ IDE, take a look at the Zeus SCC-CVS module:

  http://www.zeusedit.com/archives/scccvs.html

It was tested against MSVC++ version 6.0 but it will most probably work with later versions of MSVC++. It should work with any IDE that supports the SCC interface. It definitely works with the Zeus editor.

Jussi Jumppanen
Tuesday, June 15, 2004

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