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Merger of Microsoft-SAP almost came through

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=a8yRk1nepHpM&refer=news_index

You would have had SAP.NET, SAP XP, SAP FS, SAP etc. etc.
Everything except SAP.Working

Lastly, One doubts the DOJ in Europe or US would have looked at it kindly. And least of all SAP's customers,  who run on Unix, Linux and Oracle.

Karthik
Monday, June 07, 2004

Don't forget SAP# and Visual SAP fully integrated to Visual Studio .NET.

Wicked Cool (tm) NOT!

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

I wonder where Microsoft hires thes bullshit artists to come up with these names.

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

Its a nightmarish scenario. They would start offering incentives for SAP customers to switch from Linux and Oracle/DB2 to Windows/SQL Server. Would have dealt a severe blow to most other firms.

Karthik
Monday, June 07, 2004

A while ago, I met a guy from Microsoft's SAP Alliance(?) and man was he a powerful bullshit engine!

I am really worried about our SAP system now. You really don't want your financial data be at the mercy of MS's flip-flop products.

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

We have a SAP system too and than heavens it did not go through

Karthik
Monday, June 07, 2004

Just think -- MS would still have had 6.4 billion in cash left over.

(what in the world are they going to do with 56.4 billion in little green bits of paper, anyway?)


Monday, June 07, 2004

SAP customers. Seems logical for MS to be in that business.

Feynman's Electron
Monday, June 07, 2004

Imagine what would have happned, if MS had been in hardware or car maufacturing business.

I bet it would have been a lot scarier and nastier than "The Day After Tomorrow."

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

"A while ago, I met a guy from Microsoft's SAP Alliance(?) and man was he a powerful bullshit engine!"

Jason seems to have projection issues.

Philo

Philo
Monday, June 07, 2004

Did JOS get bought out by slashdot? ;)

Lee
Monday, June 07, 2004

Slashdot is into buying?

Feynman's Electron
Monday, June 07, 2004

<<Did JOS get bought out by slashdot? ;) >>

Not really. This is legitimate. Oracle taking over peoplesoft is also madness.

Hell, we have live data huge corporations are being run on.
Our livelihood depends on that. If we have a SAP system on UNIX and MS starts bullshitting around, what are we to do?.

Same with Oracle. What are they trying to do?. Takeover some company and tell their customers they wont enhance it any more?.

Did you think about what will happen to Microsoft's small business customers?. SAP too has a small business solution. Which one will they peddle?. After 6-7 years, i bet MS would have shut down one of the small business divisions. Just like Peoplesoft is now kissing JD Edwards goodbye.

Why should we suffer  because Ellison wants his next yatch or Bill Gates wants to build another 400$ million ?house?

Karthik 
Monday, June 07, 2004

Forgot to mention that we have one of those overly(fake) MS enthusiast in our own forum too who gets pissed off if you say bad things about his masters.

Dude, loyalty is one thing being blind and carried away like a fool by MS marketing bullshiters is something else.

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

Philo, hon

You are young and green and curious. You'll be all right in awhile.

Jason
Monday, June 07, 2004

Jason is the coolest!!!

Go Jason Go, Go Jason Go, Go Jason Go, Go Jason Go

Jason Fan Club
Monday, June 07, 2004

"Hell, we have live data huge corporations are being run on."

Anytime you buy software from a vendor, you take the risk that the vendor will get bought out, and the new owners may not have YOUR best interests in mind.  Or the vendor could simply go out of business, [any number of scenarios that leave you with an unsupported product or worse], etc.

I don't know how big corps think about such things when they decide to implement Peoplesoft or SAP or similar software, but the dependencies that underpin any enterprise software are numerous, and any of them could get merged or otherwise or change radically, or simply disappear from the market.

AMS
Monday, June 07, 2004

Pure bullshit.

MS want ERP vendors to think they almost acquired SAP.  Then ERP vendors will think wow that could be us.  How can we make ourselves more attractive to MS for buyout.  I know, we'll program a bunch of .net crap in.

This gets vendors to try to play extra nice with .net when the business market place has pretty much said J2EE is what we want.

obvious
Monday, June 07, 2004

<<Anytime you buy software from a vendor, you take the risk that the vendor will get bought out, and the new owners may not have YOUR best interests in mind>>

Not realy. You buy on basis of TRUST. That the vendor will continue to provide updates and keep the product upto date.

Would you buy citydesk today, if you **knew** that  it would be getting bought over by macromedia, shut down and deprecated in favor of, say, Macromedia.NET or whatever?

No, you dont. You buy because you trust Joel (and probably rightly) that he wont sell your interests to some big company.

Karthik 
Monday, June 07, 2004

Sure, you buy because you trust that a vendor wont sell your interests to another company.  But, particularly for a publicly owned vendor, if a buyer acquires enough shares he can take control against the wishes of current management.

Also, wave enough cash at a vendor and at some point it's in THEIR (or their stockholders) best interest to take it, even if it means bad news for the customers.  Some may say "no, I don't want the money, my customers trust me not to sell out to a competitor" but in reality how many will actually do that?

I'm curious about the extent to which companies think about these scenarios when contemplating major software implementations.

AMS
Monday, June 07, 2004

Well, if memory serves me right Microsoft bought Navision a while ago to enter the CRM market, now there must be a Microsoft CRM Solution, or something,  but it doesn't seem to be getting too much attention.

It's like if Microsoft was trying to enter every market just to be there, to establish a presence and wait for the market to mature before starting their full marketing and engineering goliath machine.

Anyway, I had this idea that the ERP market was somewhat receding and companies were going for less monolithic solutions, It seems I'm wrong.

Daniel Tio
Tuesday, June 08, 2004

Jason, isn't it past your bed time?


Tuesday, June 08, 2004

"bought Navision a while ago to enter the CRM market" -- No, Navision was a *content management* vendor -- it turned into Content Management Server.

Duncan Smart
Tuesday, June 08, 2004

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