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Lazy man seeks simple spec.

We are considering converting our application to conform to the "Windows" look, ie: File, Edit, View etc.

Familiar icons, standardised OK and Cancel buttons... the MS  BIG-mac with extra fries please !

Trouble is im just damn lazy and want to avoid trolling through 300+ page books on how to design a GUI, and then drafting a lengthy report/spec.

Does anyone have a short (20 page or so) summary of the main requirements of a MS "style" GUI, preferably with lots of pictures  (less reading to do!)

Any labour saving suggestions welcomed.

Davey Neilson
Saturday, June 05, 2004

300 pages is nothing.

Green Pajamas
Saturday, June 05, 2004

Mr GPJ's - my heartfelt thanks for your kind offer, when can you start reading ?

Davey Neilson
Saturday, June 05, 2004

Hire someone for the project to assist you.

Simon Lucy
Saturday, June 05, 2004

I thought you had some specific book in mind.

Green Pajamas
Saturday, June 05, 2004

Uh... the easiest thing to do is .... just do it.  If you try to find texts about user interface guidelines, you will surely descend into the pits of a recursively defined software hell populated by pompous academics.

Given your requirements, the best style guide is probably something like the "scribble" sample application that exists in every serious Microsoft development language.

There's nothing sacred about the Windows application standard except that users expect Windows applications to have named things in certain places.

Then there's Joel's "User Interface Design for Programmers" book, but I think you want something more literal and basic. Scribble is what you're looking for.

Lastly: around 1990 a standard called CUA, "Common User Access", was the PHB flavored attempt to impose standards on developers. If you want a formal definition, CUA is probably the place to look. But I bet that Windows look and feel have drifted substantially away from CUA...

Bored Bystander
Saturday, June 05, 2004

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnwue/html/appxb.asp

_
Saturday, June 05, 2004

Actually, it is often amazing as to why someone would use a standard windows menu bar etc. Even to further this issue, how ARE you, and WHY should you lay some things out in a particular way?

The answer …familiarly….

As most said here…just do it. Hence model the behavior after the MOST popular software you can find. I have some comments on this very concept here:

http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn/Articles/UseAbility/UserFriendly.htm

The above also has some screen shots of some menu bars in windows that I made...again based on everything else!

Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn

Albert D. Kallal
Saturday, June 05, 2004

I like "Developing User Interfaces for Microsoft Windows" by Everett McKay - Microsoft Press - ISBN 0-7356-0586-0

It's about 600 pages but with big print and lots of diagrams.

There's also a 30 page version on the net; it comes in the "30 page series" which also has titles on Brain Surgery and Bridge Design.

Stephen Jones
Saturday, June 05, 2004

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnwue/html/appxb.asp might be a better link.

Steve Jones (UK)
Monday, June 07, 2004

Hmm... silly MSDN.

Try this: http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/dnwue/html/welcome.asp?frame=true

Steve Jones (UK)
Monday, June 07, 2004

Thanks to all who offered suggestions (even Mr 300 pages is easy!) 

Some good stuff here which has helped a lot.

Thanks again

Davey N.

Davey Neilson
Monday, June 07, 2004

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