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Must I worry?

Last September, I was walking out of my job when they gave me a raise, almost 98%. This year, they gave a raise to everyone in the office during the month of April, but they left me out. In the last 15 months, I've done 7 applications and written at least 2 GB of documents of all kinds. I am feeling very low and I dont know what to do. Must I talk to them about it? Must I look elsewhere? I am very paranoid about my job, I know for no reason, but that's how I am. Inspite of my good work, I think many times before I go up to them to ask for anything. Must I grieve over this or must I just forget it? Do I have reason to be upset? Do I need to worry or must I be content with what I have? Am I being greedy?

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

"In the last 15 months, I've done 7 applications and written at least 2 GB of documents of all kinds."

Does any of this actually drive the business, or make the company more profitable. 2GB of documents is worthless in and of itself. What have you done that makes the company more profitable?

If you are concerned, then put together a list of what you have done for the company (not just what you have done) and then talk to your manager.

Ever since they nearly doubled your salary, is your pay on par with the industry?

Whatever
Saturday, May 08, 2004

>Does any of this actually drive the business, or make the company more profitable. 2GB of documents is worthless in and of itself. What have you done that makes the company more profitable?

Yes, it has added to more customers, more projects from existing customers and a growing income for the co. My salary, I must confess, is quite towards the upper end of pay packets within the company. But if I compare it to salaries outside in *large* companies, then its nothing to be shocked about.

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

I'd imagine that they thought that as they'd given you an almost doubling of salary 8-9 months ago that that included the rise this year.

If it bothers you ask why.

If it embarrasses you or shames you to ask then likely you don't warrant it.

After a certain point there's really no correlation between the value of the work you do in terms of revenue and what you get paid.  There is a point you can reach where you get paid so you don't go anywhere else and you may have reached that, or, more likely, you were valued enough to keep and they found the right level to keep you at.

Salary is in no way a measure of worth, still less self worth, its the value on a contract.

Simon Lucy
Saturday, May 08, 2004

>I'd imagine that they thought that as they'd given you an almost doubling of salary 8-9 months ago that that included the rise this year.

>There is a point you can reach where you get paid so you don't go anywhere else and you may have reached that, or, more likely, you were valued enough to keep and they found the right level to keep you at.

I think you are right, but does that mean I won't be considered for a raise ever? What must I do? Must I talk to them? Or if I talk to them, is there a possibility they are going to think I am only after money all the time?

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

> Or if I talk to them, is there a possibility they are
> going to think I am only after money all the time?

What are they interested in?

son of parnas
Saturday, May 08, 2004

>What are they interested in?


:) Good one! So should I talk then?

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

"almost 98%" - you have deep psychological issues...

Avid Merrion
Saturday, May 08, 2004

I mean, why couldn't you say: "they doubled my salary"?

Avid Merrion
Saturday, May 08, 2004

>I mean, why couldn't you say: "they doubled my salary"?

I didn't want to be repetitive. I mentioned that in September, with my first post on this board.

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

>almost 98%" - you have deep psychological issues...

??

A regular poster to this forum
Saturday, May 08, 2004

As I said, a salary is a value on a contract and contracts can be renegotiated.  Because you're making assumptions as to why you didn't get a rise when others did, and they didn't say anything I'd just talk to your line manager and informally ask for confirmation or not.

That you bring up how much work you think you've done tends to suggest that you're dissatisfied or don't feel valued and that the salary situation is how you're making that dissatisfaction concrete.

It could be there are entirely other reasons for your dissatisfaction, perhaps you don't think you're actual input on decisions is looked for or respected, perhaps you just need more strokes.

None of that is a bad thing, most likely your management are making the assumption that everything is fine with you, if it isn't then you should let them know.  Even if, as is most frequent, its a matter of perception.

Simon Lucy
Saturday, May 08, 2004

If you got your salary doubled about six months ago, you do not need to worry about missing out on this raise.  Possibly it was your salary increase that clued in management that it was time for everyone else to get a review also, i.e. you may have just been leading the pack.

You do seem excessively anxious.  Don't fret so much (ahem, potkettleblack, well nevermind).  You should still be patting yourself on the back over the last raise, and not looking over your cubicle wall at the next guy.  Quit borrowing trouble worrying about never getting another raise again, that's dumb.  You'll deal with that when it gets to be a problem, if it does.  Let this go.  Go spend some of your new money.

Matt Conrad
Saturday, May 08, 2004

They doubled your pay based on what they thought of your potential at the time. Has your potential *increased* in the time since that counter offer?

In other words, let's say they doubled your salary because they know you produce a billable application every month. Now it's nine months later and you've produced nine applications - you've simply earned your pay, so why should you get a pay raise?

You got a 100% pay raise which you've enjoyed for months longer than your peers. I'd have to file this under "quit your whining."

Now the thing to do is to mark your progress from now until next year. If you think your capabilities have *improved*. then you can raise the issue.

Philo

Philo
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Do you think your feelings of paranoia and insecurity will go away if you change jobs?

Cognitive Dissonance
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Jeez, if I had my salary /doubled/ 6 months ago I wouldn't be throwing my toys out of the cot because I missed out this time round. Unless I was being paid a really shit rate to start with, but doesn't sound like you were...

bleep
Saturday, May 08, 2004

"ahem, potkettleblack, well nevermind"

Who are you calling BLACK??

Omarosa
Saturday, May 08, 2004

You don't say what your original salary was, and how your current salary compares to the other people.

Whatever it is, you should receive an increase if everyone else does. Go and ask for it.

Mr Helpful
Saturday, May 08, 2004

If you want to know why you did not get a raise, ask!  Don't stew about it just ask.  It might be because you got the big raise, it might be something else but you will never know if you don't ask someone.  It sounds like you are doing a good job based on the big raise and what you have done, but the only way to know for sure is to talk to your manager.  You need to know what he expects of you and what has to happen for you to get your next raise. 

John McQuilling
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Personally I wouldn't have stayed the first time (if they think you are worth double the salary then they should have damn well paid you that in the first place, instead of trying to get you on the cheap), but I agree with others here - you already had your rise, so stfu! But sure, ask why you didn't get a raise this time, in a non-confrontation way.


Monday, May 10, 2004

Thanks for helping with your suggestions, guys. I feel slightly better now. I'll probably go and ask, but only casually. And then I shouldn't worry, no, even if I don't get it this time?

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Monday, May 10, 2004

#%!^%&


Delete! Delete!

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Monday, May 10, 2004

"Don't worry about the future. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum. The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday."

- Mary Schmich from 'Wear Sunscreen'

robtwister
Monday, May 10, 2004

"The real troubles in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 4 p.m. on some idle Tuesday."

I am intrigued. Gimme an example.

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Tuesday, May 11, 2004

2GB ~ 2 000 000 000 bytes  in ~456 days that's about 4 000 000 bytes a day, divide by 24, by 60, by 60 results in a ~45 bytes a second continually, no sleep. At ~ 1 byte / typed character, you must be one hell of a touch typist. Or are you writing your documentation in Word :-)

-tim

a2800276
Tuesday, May 11, 2004

Yeah, MS Word, Page Maker, all kinds of graphics as well.

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Tuesday, May 11, 2004

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