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Interview question for VB Entry Level Programmer?

Plese share your experience in this topics. What you have faced during the Interview as a  Entry Level VB Programmer? and how you handeled them..... ?

Interviwers are also requested to share their experience.

Thanks,

Sankar Roy

Sankar Roy
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Question #1: What other languages do you know?

Hiring somebody with VB as their only programming language is a recipe for attracting incompetence.  You need some evidence that their techincal knowledge extends beyond the confines of VB.

NoName
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Please explain why "On Error Resume" turns every function into a random number generator.

Ryan Seacrest
Saturday, May 08, 2004

NoName:

Why?

Sankar is hiring an entry-level _VB_ programmer.  Why would knowledge of another language matter? Would it be better to have a more flexible engineer who could work on a different project using a different language?  Yes.  But that's not what Sankar appears to be looking for.

I agree with your concept--the candidate needs to have a good understanding of programming fundamentals--but the knowledge of one or more other languages won't demonstrate the candidate satisfies this requirement.

Sankar:  Go read Joel's article on interviewing.  Ignore the parts that require an understanding of pointers by doing something like writing code to reverse a string in place. Instead ask the candidate if they understand the difference between the ByRef and ByVal keywords.

I spent a lot of time mentoring my developers on this specific point during the six years it took to develop our last product (which, incidentally, was written entirely in VB.  Total sales to date ~$16 million.)

It IS important that they understand the general concept of a pointer, but I don't believe it's a requirement that an entry-level VB programmer understands how to reverse a string in place using pointer manipulation in C.

Here's a link to the article:

The Guerrilla Guide to Interviewing
http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000073.html

Just remember:  Smart and Gets Things Done.  Keep repeating that to yourself during the interview process.

Good luck!

Dave

Dave
Saturday, May 08, 2004

(I just realized that there isn't a reason why you couldn't have your candidate reverse a string using VB.  This would be a good exercise for the candidate to do right in front of you, on the white board, and should give you a good understanding of their level of competence.

What's great about this sort of exercise, in my experience, is that you get to see how the candidate breaks down a problem to formulate a solution. The ability to do this, not knowledge of a specific programming language, is the most important thing a candidate can possess.)

Dave
Saturday, May 08, 2004

StrReverse(Var)

_
Saturday, May 08, 2004

"I agree with your concept--the candidate needs to have a good understanding of programming fundamentals--but the knowledge of one or more other languages won't demonstrate the candidate satisfies this requirement."

Knowing multiple languages is not enough. However I would say that *not* knowing multiple languages is a good indicator that the candidate does *not* have a good grasp of the fundamentals, or at least their perspective would be skewed by their one-language knowledge.

Having at least a few months familiarity with multiple languages is not a high requirement for an entry level programmer.  Where I went to college even math majors learned 2 or 3 languages by the time they graduated.

Unless this is for something like a 9-month contract, it is important even for the entry-level candidates to demonstrate the capability to learn something more than a single programming language.  Many programmers actually do not have the capability or desire to do that.

NoName
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Also, knowing only a single language, especially when that single language is VB, demonstrates a lack of interest in learning about software development and technology.

NoName
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Oh, jeez, the guy is looking for an antry-level VB programmer.  If you get a superstar C/C++ programmer with 10 years' experience he'll be gone in no time because he will get bored.

So....

Look for:
- "Smart, and get things done" (of course....)
- Look at the applicant's portfolio of work.
- Asses whether the person's personality is one you can get along with.

XL
Saturday, May 08, 2004

I am not talking about professional experience in multiple languages.  An entry level programmer should be able to demonstrate at least the level of understanding that is normally gained in college courses, whether the languages were self-taught, learned at a prior job, or learned in college.

If you want a programmer who has a high probability of being destined for permanent mediocrity, then go ahead and hire the one-trick VB pony.  A programmer with real drive and talent would bring more to the table than just VB.

NoName
Saturday, May 08, 2004

What about hiring a Windows guy ?  Would he have to know about plumbing, roofing and be an electrician too ?

What if you just wanted your windows fixed ?

Why would you hire a roofer to do your windows ?

VBer
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Real-life example:  I've done homework programs in Java, C, C++, and COBOL, but haven't programmed professionally in anything but VB.  Would I be considered to know multiple languages?

Kyralessa
Saturday, May 08, 2004

For an entry level person, yes I would accept that you have adequate knowledge of multiple languages if you can answer questions about the languages you claim to have learned and the programs you wrote.

NoName
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Entry Level:

What are the advantages / disadvantages of using a COM component / DLL in an application.?

What is an N Tier Application?

What is a class, property, method, event?

What is a collection? What is the advantage of a strongly typed collection?

What is encapsulation, polymorphism & how are they beneficial?

Basic ADO questions: connection, command, recordset objects.

That's some of the basics I have been asked.......

genx'r
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Hello Friends,

Greetings from Sankar !!!!!

I am really happy to see your spontaneous reply/comments.

But, I am not trying to hire anybody; instead I want to get hired :-). That’s why I have requested to put some "sample questions" (those who have experience in facing real life Entry level VB Interview) and from the interviewer (questions with what kind of answer you expect).

I think this discussion will help a lot of other guys, looking for an entry-level VB Programming Job.

By the way, may I get your suggestion about the possibility of getting an entry level VB programming job based on my following qualification:

1. Educational: B.Sc (pure science)
2. Programming: VB6, C++ (Classroom knowledge only)
3. Database: MS ACCESS, Sybase
4. Developed small apps like, Internet Evidence Eraser, E-mail Merger (VB & Access), SMTP Mail Sender, Picture Viewer etc.

Thank you all...

Waiting for your comments,

Sankar
Calcutta, India

Sankar Roy
Sunday, May 09, 2004

Sankar,

<quote>
Interviwers are also requested to share their experience.
</quote>

If you are looking to hire an entry level VB programmer, there is one critically important question to ask:

* How do you build your VB skills?

If they do not mention a good book (ie Code Complete, Hardcore Visual Basic - NOT VB for Dummies), studying the help files, being a member of a user group (which one?), being a member of a mailing list (which one?) etc etc, then you have to question whether they will cease to be entry level. ;-)

Seeya
Matthew

Anon
Monday, May 10, 2004

NoName,

<quote>
If you want a programmer who has a high probability of being destined for permanent mediocrity, then go ahead and hire the one-trick VB pony.  A programmer with real drive and talent would bring more to the table than just VB.
</quote>

The thing is, the one-trick pony might be just what you need if all you want is that one trick. ;-)

While knowledge of other languages is helpful, it would hardly be the top of the list for an entry level job. My expertise is VB (I have used other languages here and there, but in a limited capacity) and I know it very well. Obviously I need more drive and talent. ;-)

Seeya
Matthew

Anon
Monday, May 10, 2004

If I'm hiring just for a six-month contract, then one trick might be fine.  If I'm hiring an employee who I hope to keep for 3-5 years, I will want some evidence that they have the will and ability to learn another language.  I don't want to hire somebody who becomes useless after 18 months because the company decides to use C# or Python instead of VB.

NoName
Monday, May 10, 2004

If said individual was willing to learn one language, why wouldn't he/she be willing to learn another?  As with human languages, the second is always easier than the first.

Kyralessa
Tuesday, May 11, 2004

Jeez, just hire the best man (or woman!) for the job!

Stuart Keir
Sunday, May 16, 2004

Usually for new candidates I check out http://www.techinterviews.com and adapt some questions for my company. Plus the usual things about the candidate's goals and what not.

Ted Whissemore
Friday, May 21, 2004

now a days interviews are tough.

kathy
Saturday, May 22, 2004

go back to india you fuck

fuck you
Friday, July 16, 2004

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