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What sort of professional recognition would mean t

.
Friday, May 07, 2004

What sort of professional recognition would mean the most to you?

.
Friday, May 07, 2004

A Nobel Prize

Karthik
Friday, May 07, 2004

I gotta go with long green...

_
Friday, May 07, 2004

An entry on www.softwarelegends.com would please me, but only if the long green were in place first.

Norrick
Friday, May 07, 2004

Honest and sincere appreciation for the work that I have done to help make other peoples "bone-us"'s

Anonx
Friday, May 07, 2004

ditto long green (hey! I learned a new phrase.)

" ", a guy that's been posting way longer than philo
Friday, May 07, 2004

To have the PHB realize that three months worth of sleepless nights to deliver his shitty project *was* the reason he was able to cash the check, not his stupid 'business vision' "skills".

Oh, and to answer the question I would also go with looooong green, by the way.

.NET Developer
Friday, May 07, 2004

Hum…my MVP award from Microsoft has been not bad…..

You can read about my experience at the Summit here:

http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn/MVP/index.htm



Albert D. Kallal
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
kallal@msn.com
http://www.attcanada.net/~kallal.msn

Albert D. Kallal
Friday, May 07, 2004

To have the guys at the company I was a No-Hire at a few weeks ago come back in a few years and _beg_ me to work there.

Kyralessa
Friday, May 07, 2004

Satisfaction of doing what one loves is award enough. Who needs recognition but the insecure and the weak?!

grunt
Friday, May 07, 2004

The thing I really love is when a customer/user tells me "Wow, your program has made my life so much easier... thank you!" I once had a particularly happy customer tell me "If you took away this program now I would cry!" :-)

John C.
Friday, May 07, 2004

My MVP award has also been very nice. The recognition and perks are great!

But the best recognition would be getting paid a lot. :)

sid6581
Saturday, May 08, 2004

The question, grunt, wasn't what recognition we _needed_.

Kyralessa
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Kyralessa,

I rephrased the question in my head to "What sort of professional recognition would you need the most?" as you would need the thing for it to have so much (the most) meaning to you.

Then I wrote my post meaning that you really need nothing for what you do to mean something to you.

Recognition adds nothing to you, nor does it remove anything. It is just a way to pump up your ego and that will do nothing but harm as your head will expand and touch the sun.

grunt
Saturday, May 08, 2004

As an example, take the poster who said "A Nobel Prize"... If something he invents helps thousands or millions of people, why would he care that he got the recognition of a bunch of scholars and received a nobel prize?  Does he really need the reassurance that he is doing something great? Would the people he is helping not be good enough of a recognition for him? Do his efforts need to be materialized into an award for him to realize that others appreciate him?

Deep inside, the OP and whoever thinks they need recognition from others are on a quest to end their insecurity.

grunt
Saturday, May 08, 2004

What is "long green"?

An Aussie
Saturday, May 08, 2004

US Dollars

Rhys Keepence (Another Aussie)
Saturday, May 08, 2004

The only recognition I need is being in enought demand to be able to freely choose problem field, tools, and people to work with. Awards can be worthy as a step to the above, but money are only important in their absence.

Egor
Saturday, May 08, 2004


"Recognition adds nothing to you, nor does it remove anything. It is just a way to pump up your ego and that will do nothing but harm as your head will expand and touch the sun. "

I certainly hope you never manage anyone. If you do, I pity those poor people that have to endure working for you.

Mark Hoffman
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Meeting a member of the Office 12 team and having them say "Oh, so you're Philo"

Made my day. :)

Alternatively, having an online forum full of creditable developers spend days arguing over whether or not my having a great day was on-topic for the forum.

[grinning, ducking, running]
Philo

Philo
Saturday, May 08, 2004

> "Recognition adds nothing to you, nor does it remove
> anything. It is just a way to pump up your ego and that
> will do nothing but harm as your head will expand and
> touch the sun. "
>
> I certainly hope you never manage anyone. If you do, I
> pity those poor people that have to endure working for
> you.

There are ways to appreciate people without making their peers feel unappreciated. If you pick one, and award that one, the rest will go into defensive mode either openly or without even you knowing about it.

grunt
Saturday, May 08, 2004

Any time you want a job here, just come in. No need to phone in advance.

Christopher Wells
Saturday, May 08, 2004

"There are ways to appreciate people without making their peers feel unappreciated. If you pick one, and award that one, the rest will go into defensive mode either openly or without even you knowing about it. "

This sounds similiar to the concept of not allowing kids to "win" at a game because nobody wants to be a loser, or never flunking anyone because it might hurt their self-esteem.

It's still a bunch of hogwash.

We reward top performers. Those that aren't top performers are rewarded less, if at all. If you want a huge pile of mediocre people then by all means continue to treat them all the same.

The pro's will go somewhere where they will be recognized, while the mediocre people will be content to stay.

Mark Hoffman
Saturday, May 08, 2004

> If something he invents helps thousands or millions of people, why would he care that he got a nobel prize?

You are so right - people who do this sort of work are selfish and unreasonable. They should all be shot, as per your fine suggestion.

Lunatic
Sunday, May 09, 2004

Babeage.

Jorel on Software
Sunday, May 09, 2004

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