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Tried Outlining program on easel pads?

Has anyone ever tried writing thier program outline (schema, types, classes, etc.) on easel pad sheets and posting those on the wall for easy reference?

I'm working on the architecture of a series of a dozen or so programs that'll reuse a basic structure.

I'm finding that I spend a lot of time flipping back and forth between type definitions, classes, etc.

I'm thinking of using something like these:
Avery® Write-On Cling Sheets, 27" x 34", Plain White Paper
http://www.officedepot.com/ddSKU.do?level=SK&id=888321

You can stick 'em on any wall and write on 'em in eraseable or permanent marker.


Anyone tried this?
Anyone tried this particular product?
Any helpful hints of what worked or didn't?

(And if anyone's interested, I'll report back how they work for ME).

Mr. Analogy
Sunday, May 02, 2004

I was in a session where something like that was used. The pad was on a easel and when a page was filled it was stuck up on the wall so we had all the pages visible at the same time.  I don't recall anyone writing on the pages once they were off the easel so I don't know if that would work.  I thought it workrd great.

John
Sunday, May 02, 2004

Mr. A - If this is something that's going to stay around for a while, you could also do up the diagrams/tables/etc. and have them printed in large format on a plotter. Most Kinkos, etc. have the ability to do this.

I like printing them to 11x17, as that's big enough to show the detail I want and small enough to be manageable.

  --Josh

JWA
Sunday, May 02, 2004

Cheap solution: print to multiple pages and tape them together (invest in a roller cutter from staples - huge time save in trimming edges)

Cooler solution, good investment if clients visit your office - print at Kinko's. They have a good setup where you can upload the file via their website and just go pick it up. It wasn't too expensive either.

Best, but most expensive solution: invest in a large-format printer (eBay!)

Philo

Philo
Sunday, May 02, 2004

Actually, I want a tool that won't get in the way of the thinking. So, I'd prefer to write on the large sheets, rather than entering them in the computer and printing them.

That also lets me modify things.

But, good suggestions if I do print them out.

Mr. Analogy
Sunday, May 02, 2004

I do this all the time.  Two or three of us will go in the conference room and map out the solution to the problem.  Then the person doing the actual coding will take the sheets back to his office/cube and hang them from the wall until he's done.  It works great because the large sheets are easier for everyone to refer to at once.

Brian
Monday, May 03, 2004

Another cheap suggestion: go to Home Depot and get 8'x4' sheets of white board facing material.  Ours were $12 each.  They're not quite as erasable as standard whiteboards once you've let the design sit for a while, but extra whiteboard cleaning solution is also cheap.  And if you deal with customers in the office, you may want to spend extra time and money framing them.  But either way, it's the cheapest writable wall you'll ever own.

Mikayla
Monday, May 03, 2004

Those static sheets eventually lose their cling as well.

I use them constantly anyway.  If you leave stuff on them for a while they won't erase very well either, but it works.

Steve Barbour
Monday, May 03, 2004

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