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VMWare database acccess

I plan to install VMWare on My Dell XP laptop. After that, i plan to install SUSE as guest operating system.

So far so good. But i want to install ORacle or some other Linux database on the Linux OS. I want to communicate with the Oracle database using my Visual Basic/C++ application.

Can someone tell me whether its possible. HAving two operating systems on the same machine (one with VMWAre guest access) and building a client app that runs on windows?

K
Saturday, April 17, 2004

So you're saying basically you want the virtual server for your application running in a VM?

Absolutely - so long as you set up the network on the Linux VM, the guest and host can talk via IP like they're two separate machines.

BTW, this is an absolutely awesome way to develop - having your own server you can kill at whim. :)

(Make sure to copy the VM file once you've got it running the way you like it)

Philo

Philo
Saturday, April 17, 2004

Philo,

Can you please point out some document which helps me.
I am basically VB person. I dont know much about setting up stuff like IP addresses and Linux machines.

K
Saturday, April 17, 2004

Is this for a project from work? Or a personal pursuit?

Learning to set up Linux and network configuration is a good goal, but if it's for work your resources are probably better spent getting a sysadmin there to get it set up for you while you just write code.

That said, if you do need to learn Linux, VMWare is the best way to do it, and Google is your best resource. :)
(Hint: "how to" is the golden phrase for finding walkthroughs in linuxville)

Philo

Philo
Saturday, April 17, 2004

Philo,

Its a personal pursuit for a freeware. But pointers are appreciated.

K
Saturday, April 17, 2004

K, first, get VMWare.  Install it.

Then, download your Linux distro's ISO images.  Burn them to CDs if you don't want to keep them on your harddrive.

Create a new virtual machine, apply the settings to make it boot from the CD (or ISO image). If using a CD, insert it and start the virtual machine.  You should see Suse's installer now.

When it gets to the networking part, open a command prompt on your host OS (windows) and enter the command "ipconfig /all".  If DHCP is enabled (according to the printout of that command) then use DHCP for Linux too.  If not, use the printout to enter the details of your network connection in the Linux installer except for the IP Address (you have to find a free IP by pinging).

After the Linux install, all you have to do is install Oracle.

Wayne
Saturday, April 17, 2004

"After the Linux install, all you have to do is install Oracle"

Yeah, that's all. Then, to relax you can read War & Peace or learn Chinese. [grin]

Philo

Philo
Saturday, April 17, 2004

hehe, I admit the instructions were over-simplified. (to say the least :-)

K, honestly I think that if you are doing this on your own that you'd better be prepared to invest some "exploration time" to learn things about the server applications you want to work with.  This will only help you.

I think that if you downloaded all of the software that you need and just give it a shot, you'll know more sooner than asking, because detailed instructions don't come from a single source.

I've heard that the Oracle install can be a pain, but I have limited experience with it.

Also, regarding VMWare: I've not been able to find a way to make the Host OS communicate with the Guest OS when a real network cable isn't plugged into the computer.

Wayne
Saturday, April 17, 2004

You need to install the Microsoft loopback adapter on the host machine (it's a network adapter driver that's already on the list), then set it up for a local IP like 192.168.2.200. Then the machines will talk back and forth just fine. :)

"I've heard that the Oracle install can be a pain, but I have limited experience with it."

My experience with it isn't limited, and yes, it's a pain. Circa 2001 installing it on Redhat took three consultants four days. (I cannot vouch for the quality of the consultants [grin] )

Philo

Philo
Saturday, April 17, 2004

Use mandrake linux, which is very easy to install.

nobody
Saturday, April 17, 2004

Loopback adapter works great!  Thank you Philo.

Wayne
Sunday, April 18, 2004

When people ask about Oracle on Linux, I tell them that when I was installing 8i on RH7.2 circa 2002, I found God. There was hardly any documentation and you literally sweated blood to get things working.

"I have installed oracle and RH about 20 times in a week (sometimes easier to hose system than to diagnose), with about 4 or 5 end results. "

At the time I was doing development with openacs. Have not installed oracle 9i on linux so your mileage may vary. Did end up with a good installation documented somewhat here 
http://openacs.org/forums/message-view?message_id=33671

If it is still that painful, my recommendation is that you first research Oracle installations on Linux. Pick a distro with the most support/community for this. Once  you do, practice installing Oracle until you get it right because you might find yourself having to hose your system and starting from scratch a few times. Only once you are confident installing oracle should you build the rest of your setup.

Tapiwa
Tuesday, April 20, 2004

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