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VC++ .NET

A very quick question by a Java programmer to a crowd of mostly Microsoft programmers: can I develop an application in VC++ .NET and build it in a way that doesn't need the .NET framework to run, i.e, an old school C++ app?

RP
Thursday, April 08, 2004

Yes. All of the .NET specific APIs will be off-limits of course, but you can still write plain old C++ with VC++.NET.

Sexist
Thursday, April 08, 2004

And, you should use VC++ .NET as opposed to VC++ 6. The compiler is much, much improved.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Thursday, April 08, 2004

The 7.1 compiler is fantastic.

Craig
Friday, April 09, 2004

To bad the IDE sucks so hard...

fffffffffffffft
Friday, April 09, 2004

Nice troll. Anybody who's actually given the VS.NET IDE a fair chance would agree it's definitely one of (and quite possibly *the*) best IDE in existence for any language or from any vendor.

Sexist
Friday, April 09, 2004

I like the VS.NET IDE a lot, but it's not as good as the VC++ 6 IDE.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Saturday, April 10, 2004

I was impressed by VS.net.

But to call it the best IDE for any language is just silly.  Give IDEA or eclipse a try and you'll change your mind.

Koz
Sunday, April 11, 2004

I have used Eclipse extensively. It has most of VS.NET's features (and even a couple VS.NET doesn't have, like refactoring) but it's just not *slick*, you know? It was the little things like having a different "perspective" for coding and debugging, and whenever I switched back-n-forth between them, it never quite correctly remembered all my settings for each one so I'd have to do an extra mouse click or two. Or the intellisense--on Eclipse, once you get a dropdown list of completion items and change your mind and hit backspace to erase the last word, the dropdown list stays open trying to find a match and then the performance of the backspace keys grinds to nothing as the list goes searching...
  On the other hand, Eclipse's support for things like designing GUIs wasn't nearly as good as VS.NET.

  I stand by my earlier claim. Obviously, you'll have a preference for whichever IDE is most familiar to you, which is why so people who've used VS.NET only occasionally prefer Eclipse (or IDEA or SlickEdit or whatever). But after extensively using both, VS.NET 2003 simply has more polish.

Sexist
Sunday, April 11, 2004

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