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Oracle - Linux vs Windows 2003

I'm not trying to start a thread war of Linux vs Windows.

We will soon be going into production with an Oracle database. Our development Oracle server is running Redhat AS 2.1. We are mainly a Windows shop, with only the DB running under Linux.

We are getting ready to purchase our licenses for Oracle, and I was wondering if we should think about running it on Windows 2003 Server. A few years ago I remember hearing that the file system on Windows was pretty slow, which caused Oracle to run slowly. I know that 2003 has a faster file system and wondered if this helped Oracle.

Any experience with Oracle on Windows 2003?

By the way, the server will be a dual Xeon 3.x GHz with a couple of gigs or ram. We will also be doing hardware raid, and were still thinking about raid 5 vs raid 1+0…

Oracle?
Monday, March 29, 2004

Seeing you are using RH AS that gives you Oracle functionality that is to the best of my knowledge is not present on the Windows platform.

As you know, RH AS supports Oracle RAC (shared disk clustering) which gives you very nice clustering functionality. Oracle ontop of AS supports stuff like mid-transaction failover, so the transaction is not even restarted should one node fail.

If you dont need high-end clustering you could go with Oracle ontop of Windows also. Be sure to strip Windows down to a minimum. A tight Windows install is very robust.

I havent been running production systems on 2K3, but on Windows NT and Windows 2000 with no problems. It's as robust as UNIX if you dont install everything that comes with windows.

We had a very stripped down machine. Core Windows + Notepad type install. It worked very well.

It's really a matter of what you need.

Patrik
Monday, March 29, 2004

"Be sure to strip Windows down to a minimum"

Just an FYI: Windows Server 2003 default install is pretty close to the minimum (no, not even IIS is installed by default).

Philo

Philo
Monday, March 29, 2004

We won't be doing any clustering, but we will be replicating from our west to east office.

How about any speed differences in Windows Server 2003? I have done most of my Oracle work under Linux/Digital Unix, but I did play around with Oracle on Windows 2000 a while back. Should Microsoft Server 2003 be faster? I know that's a pretty generic question, but I thought maybe someone has moved their db from 2000 to 2003.

If the speed and reliably is there in 2003, it will save me from trying to teach Linux to some of the other staff(there are 10 of us). I hate being on call 24/7.  :-)

Oracle?
Monday, March 29, 2004

I'd say the speed differences between the two are probably neglidgible for your requirements.

Seun Osewa (afriguru.com)
Monday, March 29, 2004

I'll second Seun's comment. A dual Xeon 3 GHz with loads RAM will be able to run quite a database. Whether you will use Linux/Oracle, Windows 2003/Oracle or  Windows 2003/SQL Server will not make much of a difference.

A good DBA, however, and a database that has been well designed, will make a lot of difference.

I just returned from a client where the SQL Server was constantly on 80% CPU. A DBA was tuning it. When he was ready it was below 4% CPU.

Mark Tetrode
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I'll second Mark's comment.

With that kind of hardware, you will get more benefits from having a good DBA tune it than you will from fiddling with RH or Windows.

Tapiwa
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Thanks everyone, you've been lots of help.

Oracle?
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

How long can you develop in Oracle before you have to buy a license?

Jeff
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I'm not really sure.

We have been developing for a few months, and we have been talking with our Oracle rep. on and off during this time. He knows we have been developing without any license.

Oracle?
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

I think the development licence is not time limited as a given date range or something, rather it is limited to one devleopment cycle or prototyping of an application.

Once that application is either sold commercially or deployed in house into a production environment the development license is void.

Patrik
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

To clarify, here are the you-may-nots for the Oracle Development license:

You may not:

·use the programs for your own internal data processing or for any commercial or production purposes,
or use the programs for any purpose except the development of a single prototype of your application;

·use the application you develop with the programs for any internal data processing or commercial or
production purposes without securing an appropriate license from us;

·continue to develop your application after you have used it for any internal data processing, commercial
or production purpose without securing an appropriate license from us, or an Oracle reseller;

·use the programs to provide third party training;

Patrik
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

Well that seems to clear that up for me, thanks for the info.

Jeff
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

If you do Oracle on Windows, you'll have to purchase MKS toolkit to run some of the numerous patches.  Many times Oracle issues patches only in .csh format (c shell script for Unix.)  So even though you're running on Windows, someone there may need to have some unix or linux skills, at least knowing the basic commands. 

And be sure to purchase the best possible Oracle Support (MetaLink) contract you can afford; you're gonna need it.

unemployable
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

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