Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Is the VB runtime installed by default on XP ?

ie: What Win OS's can run a VB6 .exe without any "setup" installation ? 

Bella
Saturday, March 20, 2004

Wouldn't a lot depend on the runtime you are using?

Stephen Jones
Saturday, March 20, 2004

The VB6 run-time shipped with WinNT, Win 2000 and Win XP

But it really depends what components you are using. If you are just using the basic controls and nothing else you may be OK.

DJ
Saturday, March 20, 2004

"The VB6 run-time shipped with WinNT, Win 2000 and Win XP"

Via a time machine?

Windows NT 4.0 was shipped in 1996. The current version of Visual Basic at that time was 4.x... VB6 was 2 years away. Perhaps it shipped with a service pack, but not with the OS itself.

Besides, the Visual Studio 6 family itself has had service packs (5 of them, if memory serves), and specific bugs may have been fixed with those later versions of the VB6 runtime. So it's not necessarily enough to require the VB6 runtime.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Saturday, March 20, 2004

There's even an updated version of the runtime (post SP5) that shipped with Windows 2003 Server.  It can be downloaded by itself.  I don't have the link handy though, sorry.

Aaron F Stanton
Saturday, March 20, 2004

Can anyone test if a non-VB6 win2k build can run a "stock" VB6 .exe ?

Bella
Saturday, March 20, 2004

The Visual Basic runtime (msvbvm60.dll) is included in the following Windows operating systems.

Version 6.0.82.44 included with:
Windows NT 4.0 SP4, SP5, SP6, SP6a

Version 6.0.84.95 included with:
Windows 2000 (Server, Professional, and Datacenter editions), Windows Millenium Edition

Version 6.0.92.37 included with:
Windows XP Home, Windows XP Professional

Version 6.0.96.90 included with:
Windows 2000 SP4, Windows Server 2003 

Sorry, I can't run the test that you ask for, all my systems already have Visual Studio installed.

Philip Dickerson
Saturday, March 20, 2004

Could you post where you got that info from? I just had a problem with a Windows 2000 Professional machine that had an old version of comdlg32.ocx installed on it and am wondering how that could have happened.

ICBW
Sunday, March 21, 2004

The information on which Microsoft products or operating systems include a particular version of a DLL is available at:
http://support.microsoft.com/servicedesks/fileversion/default.asp
Enter a DLL or OCX file name, such as "msvbvm60.dll" and click "Submit". This will produce a list of all the versions of the DLL, and each version has a "More Information" link. Clicking on a "More Information" link displays a popup with a list of Microsoft product releases (such as Visual Studio 6.0 SP5, Access 2000, Windows 2000 SP4, etc) that include that specific version, along with dates and other information.

Note that non-Microsoft products can also install versions of many of these DLLs, but I don't know of any lists of DLLs installed by non-Microsoft products. A product installation is not supposed to replace an existing DLL with an older version, but there have been a few product installers that break this rule and overwrite a DLL with an older version (I can't think of such a product at the moment, but I have encountered this in the past).

Philip Dickerson
Sunday, March 21, 2004

Thanks Philip, that was very helpful.

ICBW
Sunday, March 21, 2004

Here's a link to the article I mentioned earlier:  http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;823746

and you can get the update to the vb6 runtime at (surprise):  http://activex.microsoft.com/controls/vb6/vbrun60.cab

Funny to see that the cab files referenced by the PDW are still being updated.

Aaron F Stanton
Friday, March 26, 2004

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home