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You can't outsource this

Is there anything in the IT industry that can't be outsourced? Will system administrators always be needed? How about network installers? Anything requiring you to show up can't be outsourced right?

Looking for secure job
Sunday, March 14, 2004

CIO types seem to be pretty secure

The Artist Formerly Known as Prince
Sunday, March 14, 2004

Security guards to escort network admins out of the building ?

Damian
Sunday, March 14, 2004

Yes. System administrators are always going to be there.
The network/power in india usually sucks and even if some miracle happens, no organization can install a mouse (not software) from thousands of miles away.

But in my organization, some people do remote installs of software. Its not outsourced and americans do the job, but theoretically, a person sitting in bangalore can install a software on the machine of someone in newy york. But its unlikely that it will happen.

Karthik
Sunday, March 14, 2004

The Defense industry can't be outsourced.

Defense Industry Programmer Bob
Sunday, March 14, 2004

"Security guards to escort network admins out of the building ?"

What about when they run out of admins?

the artist formerly known as prince
Sunday, March 14, 2004

"The Defense industry can't be outsourced."

It can and it is, low end stuff now but just  wait

the artist formerly known as prince
Sunday, March 14, 2004

Artist,

No, to have a security clearance in the U.S. you need to be an American citizen.

Defense Industry Programmer Bob
Sunday, March 14, 2004

unless the whole product is outsourced http://www.ciol.com/content/search/showarticle1.asp?artid=46111

the artist formerly known as prince
Sunday, March 14, 2004

Are you guys kidding?  A substantial number of the soldiers we have fighting now are not US citizens. Many have never even been to the US.

Uncle Sam
Sunday, March 14, 2004

Soldiers don't have security clearances... defense-industry IT people do, check out Washington Post classifieds for defense jobs in IT. It's an employee's market -- "call center" tech support with Top secret/SCI Polygraph for instance make 60-80K a year; us C++/Ada types 100-140K.

Defense Industry Programmer Bob
Monday, March 15, 2004

But how does one get a security clearance?  It was my understanding that those are only obtained as part of employment - and expire during a period of unemployment. 

So if you see a want ad for someone with security clearance naturally the offer is going to be higher - they're only hiring someone who already has a job. 

Trollumination
Monday, March 15, 2004

A Secret clearance is just a database check... if you've never been arrested, it's pretty much automatic (though only U.S. citizens are eligible). There's lots of jobs in the D.C. area that just require Secret, and the programming positions pay around 80-100K.

Top secret/polygraph is where the big money is, but is somewhat of a catch-22. The small companies usually want you to have a current TS because it's a long wait to get one, and it's expensive to sponser you if you don't already have it (it expires after two years, then you have to go through the whole process again). But the big contractors like Lockheed, Raytheon, etc will hire you even if you don't have TS, though are eligible (i.e. U.S. citizen, and not a closet homosexual).  And they'll pay you $120K a year to sit in a waiting room for six months reading books until it comes through.

Defense Industry Programmer Bob
Monday, March 15, 2004

"Yes. System administrators are always going to be there."

Why?  My company has data centers all around the country.  We're able to manage them effectively from our home office.  We've had to have one coloc reset power once.  Then we got smart and bought remote reboot switches.


Monday, March 15, 2004

Every job that can be done is a business outsourcing.

The fact that the employees might be geographically scattered  (other buildings/cities/states/countries) is academic.

With tech bringing down the cost of communicating, any job can be offshored.

Tapiwa
Monday, March 15, 2004

People who physically install hardware can't be outsourced.  I'd like to see some chap in India take a computer out of a box in Indianapolis.

Aaron F Stanton
Monday, March 15, 2004

"People who physically install hardware can't be outsourced. "


Who says the hardware can't be in India or China or wherever?

 
Monday, March 15, 2004

Like I said, "in Indianapolis."  Suppose the client requires onsite hardware installation?

Aaron F Stanton
Monday, March 15, 2004

I think "blank" was implying that "no" computers have to be set up in the US, they're all in India or China.

I think along these lines, that generic midsized and small business is the last best hope of someone looking for support work. The big companies outsource a lot and will use preferred vendors for service arrangements. They have economics of scale at their disposal.

Small businesses do not have economies of scale nor an infrastructure in place for managing off site outsourced work, and will probably just have to use whomever is local who has good references.

Bored Bystander
Monday, March 15, 2004

"Suppose the client requires onsite hardware installation?"

So...

You're going to make a living by competing against the technical support offered by the PC vendors? 

Or are you going to be installing cash registers/POS systems?

I'm having a hard time imagining other situations where the box would need to be in Indy.

 
Monday, March 15, 2004

Hey, I wasn't trying to come up with an answer that made a decent living, just an answer to something that can't be outsourced in IT.

Aaron F Stanton
Monday, March 15, 2004

If businesses took customer privacy more seriously would it prevent the outsourcing of DB hosting and administration by foreign nationals? It goes both ways, it protects foreign jobs from being taken by Americans and protects American jobs as well.

Li-fan Chen
Monday, March 15, 2004

It's not really a question of whether business takes privacy more seriously, but of whether the government MAKES them take it seriously.

And you can bet the lobbying is already at work on that one. I'm just wondering what their angle would be. In the same way they argue that destroying jobs actually creates jobs, I suppose they could argue that disclosing personal data forces people to be more careful. They could even get Bruce Schneier into the act.

me
Sunday, March 21, 2004

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