Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Commanding Heights: Battle For World's Economy

I just saw episode 4 of this; the web site at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/commandingheights/ includes text transcripts, and video.

Episode 4 (of 6) was 1985 through 2000, featuring especially Bolivia, Argentina, Poland, Russia, China, India, and Russia. In the beginning it described governments stopping trying to subsidise their countries' economies (to escape hyperinflation and allow free enterprise to work instead). It ended with the Yeltsin's government's selling control of a company that had a third of the world's nickel and sales of 2 billion a year to a business man for 170 million in order to win reelection against the communists.

As well as narration, it includes brief interviews of the presidents, finance ministers, and economists who were involved.

I know that many of you are interested in globalisation and so on.

Christopher Wells
Monday, March 01, 2004

this looks really good. thanks Chris. It won't be as popular as the apperentice but, looks like good stuff :-)

Prakash S
Tuesday, March 02, 2004

Yes. It's an excellent overview, Chris. Thanks.


Tuesday, March 02, 2004

Barely related, but how is it that PBS programs are never broadcast on satellite channels like nearly all other state TV channels are?

It would be useful counterweight to the commercial stuff we receive all the time.

Stephen Jones
Tuesday, March 02, 2004

> how is it that PBS programs are never broadcast on satellite channels

I think they are broadcast, perhaps not by satellite. I think that we (in Toronto) received WNED out of Buffalo, even before we subscribed to cable.

> nearly all other state TV channels

I think that PBS isn't a "state" TV channel ... instead it's "supported by donations from corporate sponsors, and from viewers like you".

Christopher Wells
Tuesday, March 02, 2004

Cable don't run to Saudi, or Sri Lanka.

It really is not that expensive to broadcast by satellite. If Eritrea and Sudan and Somalia can do it you would think PBS could manage it.

Or do a tie up with the BBC so some of their programs are sent out free with BBC World, or paying with BBC Prime (make a welcome change ffrom five hour blocks of home improvement programs interspersed with, East Enders,  Ann Robinson and three episodes of Porridge!)

Stephen Jones
Wednesday, March 03, 2004

Amongst other things it was interesting the see (and not just read about) the 'human face' of the situation (e.g., no milk available for sale, in a European city (Poland)). There was something about it too that made me think "historical inevitability": people's needing to deal with such pressing and wide-spread problems (not that I'm suggesting that theirs was the only possible course of action: just that someone had to do something). Hats off to the politicians and economists who had a clue.

This series is actually required viewing for the school of international business at a local university here, and recommended for senior high-school students. I'm looking forward to the next episode, next week.

> Cable don't run to Saudi, or Sri Lanka.

"Doesn't run". <grin>

Well, that program at least is available as streaming video, from the URL I gave above.

For satellite information see also http://www.pbs.org/als/satsupport/what.htm

> Or do a tie up with the BBC

I watching it rebroadcast on a local educational station (called TV Ontario).

> so some of their programs are sent out free with BBC World, or paying with BBC Prime

I don't know how PBS itself's finances work. I donate to a station that's a "PBS affiliate", which I think then buys programming from PBS itself (and from other places).

Christopher Wells
Wednesday, March 03, 2004

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home