Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




Anyone see this?

http://www.wired.com/news/business/0,1367,62430,00.html

A neat spin on outsourcing, it still has all the evils of outsourcing, yet without the accent. Somehow this sort of thing even makes you feel like the company is helping people turn over a new leaf.

Funny, I was attending uni orientation yesterday, the head of department welcomed the 50 of us, and said to the sole guy doing a software engineering major "you picked the right one, you will be popular in a few years, for some reason software engineering enrolments have dropped dramatically"....

Aussie Chick
Thursday, February 26, 2004

Grr.  And of course, the US has 25% of the world's prison population with only 4% of its income, so it's a booming market.  Gotta hand it to wars on nouns.

I'll be in the corner, quietly frothing at the mouth.

Sam Livingston-Gray
Thursday, February 26, 2004

I am utterly unconcerned about a prisoner acting as a call center employee taking my programming job.  However, if the government ever makes it illegal to watch the SciFi channel, then I'll start worrying.

programmer dude
Thursday, February 26, 2004


Every once in a while I get called by a telemarketer that sounds like a thug. Now I know why.

NathanJ
Thursday, February 26, 2004

Law & Order did a show where a serial rapist got a job in one of these call centers - he hacked the database, got the caller's personal information, and started stalking her when he got out of prison.

But I'll just file this under my "Crunchy Frog Law" - there should be full disclosure requirements for call centers:

"Hello, my name is James and I have been convicted of two felonies. May I please verify your name and address for our records?"

Philo

Philo
Thursday, February 26, 2004

Philo...I'm scared to ask, but "Crunchy Frog Law" ???

Nigel
Thursday, February 26, 2004

That was actually based on a true story. I read about that someplace.

Damian
Thursday, February 26, 2004

Philo's Crunchy Frog Law (PCFL ?)

http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=76295

Damian
Friday, February 27, 2004

Philo's Crunchy Frog Law:
"If a company's reaction to a proposed disclosure is 'but our sales would plummet!' then that disclosure is required."

Based on the Monty Python sketch of the same name.

Philo

Philo
Friday, February 27, 2004

India turned down my application to emigrate, but this seems like just the ticket and no dysentary! Who do I gotta kill to get this job?

Looking for Work
Friday, February 27, 2004

"The prisoners work 40-hour weeks in rows of nondescript cubicles."

I think I used to work at that place.

Nick
Friday, February 27, 2004

I wonder if thousands of indian programmers are complaining about how they'll lose their jobs to american prison workers...

vince
Friday, February 27, 2004

the sad thing is this creates a conflict of interest between the state - release trained staff who've fully completed their sentence = potential loss in revenue .. it's open to a huge amouint of corruption

blargle
Friday, February 27, 2004

Slightly off topic, that episode of Monty Python was on Paramount Comedy Channel last night - at least in the UK.  Also featured in the Wizzo Chocolate Assortment was Cherry Fondue ("...very nasty but we actually get you for that...") , the Rams Bladder Cup, the Anthrax Whirl and the Spring Surprise ("...pop it in your mouth and two bolts spring out and piece both cheeks...").

I appear to have turned into an anorak.  It's a fair cop.

a cynic writes...
Friday, February 27, 2004

...and back on topic - the whole prison call centre thing was on an episode of CSI.

a cynic writes...
Friday, February 27, 2004

I read the sketch. It was really good.

"No artificial sweetners, colours or flavours" and no dead frog, cockroach or sheep parts was going to take that away from them.

Aussie Chick
Friday, February 27, 2004

The problem with prison labor is that it artificially deflates wages.

It's one thing to let an Indian (in India) compete for my job.  It's another for the government to put someone in jail (however legal that was) and then "encourage" that person to compete with me.

MY tax dollars are SUBSIDIZING this competitor.  Those tax dollars are paying his healthcare, room, board, etc. 

It simply would no longer be a "free market".  And the govenement has a MONOPOLY on that labor force.

Microsoft was "regulated" because it was deemed a monopoly. This regulation was intended to foster competition, which eventually helps the customer.

The real Entrepreneur
Friday, February 27, 2004

This brings to mind the scene in Shawshank Redemption when the corrupt warden accepts a bribe from a local businessman to refrain from bidding on a project. You have to love the government. First they tax you, then they use your tax dollars to "compete" for your job. BTW, where's the AFL-CIO on this issue? Why aren't they raising hell demanding that these prisoners be paid a living wage?

Rob VH
Friday, February 27, 2004

And now for something completely different...  the larch.

anon
Friday, February 27, 2004

>> "India turned down my application to emigrate, but this seems like just the ticket and no dysentary! Who do I gotta kill to get this job?"

In the US, you'll only get probation for muder.  For an extended, lucrative term in prison, you'll need to be caught smoking weed.

anon
Friday, February 27, 2004

As an Oregon resident, my tax dollars are subsidizing this competitor too.  I'm generally against prison labor competing against the free market, but I might be more inclined to accept it if the business subsidized the Oregon state prison system.  The only other upside is that I'd rather see a ex-felon hit the streets with 3+ years experience behind a desk than 3+ years walking the prison yard.

Nick
Friday, February 27, 2004

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home