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Getting Started with Your Own Software Company

http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/default.aspx?pull=/library/en-us/dnsoftware/html/software01262004.asp

GuyIncognito
Thursday, February 19, 2004

thanks for the info, 1000th post of this ... the article is however good


Thursday, February 19, 2004

  Eric Sink's articles are very good.  His column at MSDN about Business of Software is a must-read for every entrepreneur that's willing to go solo.

  The Make More Mistakes article is very good too:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnsoftware/html/software12292003.asp

Ricardo Antunes da Costa
Thursday, February 19, 2004

  Ops.  Was mine the 1000th post of the MMM article link too ? :-)

Ricardo Antunes da Costa
Thursday, February 19, 2004

Yes, Ricardo, but since you're such a nice guy, we'll let it slide this time. :-P

Zod
Thursday, February 19, 2004

"The E-Myth Revisited" by Michael Gerber is a good book.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0887307280/ref=sib_dp_pt/103-2896527-2875032#reader-link

I've only read his older 1986 version, which I say the most value can be had from reading just the first few chapters.  His latest book might be more geared to modern times though.

Just look at Joel's website.  At first he did all the hard work to create the quality content himself.  Once his site gained a critical mass of readers and popularity, most of the new content is found here on the public forums.  Of course he has to do "maintenance" work by wriiting occasionally and socializing with his fans, but now he doesn't have to devote all his limited and precious free time to it.  THAT's how you succeed in business.  That's how you work smarter, not harder.  It's what Gerber refers to as "Working on your business, not in your business."

VP
Thursday, February 19, 2004

>> That's how you work smarter, not harder.  It's what Gerber refers to as "Working on your business, not in your business."

Implying that we participants are doing the operational work of creating new, fresh content...  IOW, people other than Joel are inventing reasons to come here.

For free. Can't beat that with a stick.

Bored Bystander
Thursday, February 19, 2004

You got it Bored, now he only has to occassionally write new content and make sure people don't get (seriously) out of line, to keep the community he's created healthy.

Of course he didn't get this for free.  He paid his dues early on, but now is enjoying the interest from his investment.  He created an environment that people enjoy coming to, which is the "payment" we receive for adding more content to the site.

The people who work harder and not smarter would only create the content themselves.  When they have the time and energy, their site will be popular.  But when real life demands their time, there will be nothing else to keep the site going, and it will die...or go out of business, sorta speak.

VP
Thursday, February 19, 2004

I have no quibble with Joel. He has always appeared to be eminently ethical and fair minded and nobody holds a gun to anyone's head to post here.

I just think it's extremely clever how someone else's invention can induce so many people to work so hard at enriching a company owned, proprietary equity. With their consent, no less.

Bored Bystander
Friday, February 20, 2004

As popular as this site is, I doubt if Joel is making much money from the site. He makes money because he sells software that matches the program model to the user model.

Which doesn't have a lot to do with C# vs. VB.NET, .NET vs. Java, OOP vs. everything else, static typing vs. dynamic typing, Microsoft vs. Open Source, My Boss is a Dick, eXtreme Programming Rules, and other popular topics on this site.

magoo
Friday, February 20, 2004

"As popular as this site is, I doubt if Joel is making much money from the site. He makes money because he sells software that matches the program model to the user model."

Correct - and one of the factors that enables him to sell said software is that the site  - and all its content - lends a sense of credibility in the marketplace.

Norrick
Friday, February 20, 2004

"As popular as this site is, I doubt if Joel is making much money from the site."

Accurate in one sense I guess.  I don't know about the rest of you, but having used both fog bugz and city desk, I for one wouldn't think twice about recommending either to anyone.  Gotta be real good to have an entire community of leading IT professionals and Software Engineers passing on recommendations for your product through word of mouth.

Elephant
Friday, February 20, 2004

"As popular as this site is, I doubt if Joel is making much money from the site. He makes money because he sells software that matches the program model to the user model."

I have to disagree.  I think joelonsoftware is a great marketing tool.  It's not a *active* marketing-no banner ads or anything-but I know from my own buying experience that the things said on joel's blog were probably the major part of my deciding to purchase CityDesk.  Remember, advertising isn't about instant sales; it's about awareness.  The more people read this site, the more are aware of these products, if only marginally.  When the time comes to look for, say, a content management system, they'll know at least one good place to look.

JT
Friday, February 20, 2004

Marketing aphorism: ANY publicity is better than NO publicity.

This site generates publicity.

End of story... LOL

PS: if this site didn't exist to remind me constantly of Joel and Fogcreek, I probably would never have bought CityDesk.

Bored Bystander
Friday, February 20, 2004

Yup, you guys are all right.  Every little bit does it's part in making Joel's company a success.  You've all heard stories of companies that relied only on the technical strengths of their products and failed.

Like the article that the orignal link pointed said.  Jack-of-all-Trades people tend to make better entrepreneurs because they think of the big picture. 

VP
Friday, February 20, 2004

That said, I don't even know what Fogcreek software does, I don't know what it is called (is it called Fogcreek, or is that just the company?). I have a vague idea that in some helpful way it has something to do with webpages. And I know the head honcho is called Joel Spolsky, I have read alot of his articles, and find them inciteful.

Maybe his software is something I never knew I couldn't live without out.
I just figure whatever it is, it would costs money, and I have a number of things on my wishlist at the moment without looking for another....

(Just proving that as much as this marketing technique works, there are plenty of people (at least 1) who just think it is a great forum with good articles)

Aussie Chick
Saturday, February 21, 2004

I've found Joel's articles inciteful too.  Usually insightful as well.

;-)

veal
Monday, February 23, 2004

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