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Business development

I worked 7 yeas as a contractor for a company X. They know me as expert in software design and development/production. After I left them I started my own small software development company.

That employer X called me two times in the last 6 months and asked to talk to project managers in two big companies where X wants to outsource projects. X needs me to help them to deliver these projects to production and they also informed that I have a business. My expectation is to make more money via X, I can organize the work in my company to still sutisfy the customers.

When I come to talk to project managers they always ask me "what I do today". I told them that "I worked for X in the past, now I do projects in my own company, and I interested to deliver their projects to production through company X."

I paid attention, that after I said that my business runs well, the discussion goes to end. I also got impression that these projects managers expected me to ask them for the work (through my own company) and not via X.

The problem is that I cannot effort to waste my expensive time in the talks, which not bring real business, I'm too busy..

1. So, can it be that X sends me to these talks to check my current state in a chance to hire me back, but at some low salary?

2. Should I accept to work directly for companies, which I reach through X? Should I suggest that? I not signed new documents with X, but I think in such cases I should work through X, otherwise X will not contact me in case of real opportunity. What do you recommend?

3. I need to decide if I should to provide my support to X in the future and if their initiatives can produce real business?

Please advice.

Evgeny Gesin /Javadesk/
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

When X sends you to talk to someone, do you bill X for your time?  Why do you do anything for X for which you're not paid?

It sounds like you're still working for X for free if you're getting business for them.

Justin Johnson
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

That's important note. I will charge them next time, you are right!
Please post more comments.

Evgeny Gesin /Javadesk/
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

I think that, if X sends you to a customer to get a project for them, and the customer offers it to you, you should take it.

X is being very manipulative towards you.  They're taking advantage of you.

Justin Johnson
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

My intention was to create 'paid time', so I not charged X. If I'll be seeing expected $$$ as a result of that time, then it worthwhile.

Evgeny Gesin /Javadesk/
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

Evgeny, you're being screwed mate.

e
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

Charge a day's time to attend those meetings, since they presumably produce some disruption.

Also make it clear to your former company that, if you help land them a project, you want a percentage of the gross value of the project, in addition to your billed work on the project, if any. For example, you might charge 5 percent jsut for landing it for them.

You charge on the gross rather than the project because otherwise your former compnay can arrange things so the profit is zero and you get no money.

e
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

Evgeny,

If I were you, I'd send X a bill for the hours you worked for them, billed at your standard rate. Seriously - you did work for them they requested you do. It's no different than if I ask a plumber to fix my sink and then afterwards he gives me a bill. Just because we didn't discuss price or ask for an estimate doesn't mean that I don't owe him cash money for the work I asked him to do.

Anytime you are engaged to work in your professional capacity (as opposed to being asked by a friend to pick something up at the store), there is a presumption that you will be paid and an obligation on the part of the hiring party to pay you. make no mistake, they hired you to do the work. Now they must pay you at your standard rate. That's business. That's the real world. It would be very foolish of you not to send them a bill for your time.

Dennis Atkins
Wednesday, November 12, 2003

Hmmm... I wouldn't just send a bill to them without mentioning it first.

YES, you did do work, but they may have expected to get it for free.  (yes, that's an unfair expectation, but it may still be what they think).

Always be polite, if possible :-)

Entrepreneur
Thursday, November 13, 2003

I'm very glad you all for these comments. Thank you!

Evgeny Gesin /Javadesk/
Thursday, November 13, 2003

Alternatively you could turn the tables.

Let X know that the customers were not buying his stuff, and that you feel that they might buy yours. How would he feel about it.

He might then get you referrals for your business, and you pay him a % of the contract value.

Tapiwa
Thursday, November 13, 2003

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