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C hash or C bang

is C#  hash or bang

where I come from # is hash, but I have seen C# referred to as C bang.

what is the official line?

Tapiwa
Saturday, November 08, 2003

It's C Sharp - see the last question here - http://msdn.microsoft.com/vcsharp/productinfo/faq/default.aspx

r1ch
Saturday, November 08, 2003

I still can't get around calling it C sharp.

<rant> I think it is silly how MS want to change the English lexicon to suit themselves. Why not just call it  C++++</rant>

I will probably keep calling it C hash for a while :)

Tapiwa
Saturday, November 08, 2003

From "Wilbur's Music Tutorial #2" at

http://www.hoerl.com/Music/music2_notes.html :

"
FLATS and SHARPS: As previously stated, every note on a line or space on the staff has a pitch. This pitch can be raised or lowered in whole steps by going from one note to the next...OR the pitch can be raised or lowered in half steps by using SHARPS and FLATS.


SHARPS are indicated by the "#" sign.
A SHARP raises the musical tone by one half step (Ex: from C to C#).
"

Not-a-MS-Hack
Saturday, November 08, 2003

And by the way, #=sharp predates computers, calculators, and Univac.

Philo

Philo
Saturday, November 08, 2003

bang is an exclamation point

mhp
Saturday, November 08, 2003

In the immortal words of Bremmer and Kroese:

<> ! * ' ' #
^ " ` $ $ -
! * = @ $ _
% * <> ~ # 4
& [ ] . . /
| { , , system halted

The pronunciation is:

waka waka bang splat tick tick hash
caret quote back-tick dollar dollar dash
bang splat equal at dollar under-score
percent splat waka waka tilda number four
ampersand bracket bracket dot dot slash
vertical-bar curly-bracket comma comma crash

Troy King
Saturday, November 08, 2003

"by the way, #=sharp predates computers"

I should have guessed ... my bad... Now I can see why I am the only one in my family that is not musically gifted

mom-sings
sister- piano
brother - rap artist.
me-Joel on Software!!

Tapiwa
Saturday, November 08, 2003

Troy, nice one... will hang onto this one.

Tapiwa
Saturday, November 08, 2003

Some cheeky devils have also called it "D Flat."  (In musical notation, C Sharp and D Flat are the same note.)

Robert Jacobson
Saturday, November 08, 2003

I always call it "C pound", myself. Seems appropriate, somehow :-)

-Mark

Mark Bessey
Saturday, November 08, 2003

"Some cheeky devils have also called it "D Flat."  (In musical notation, C Sharp and D Flat are the same note.)"

Wasn't there a D-Flat project several years ago in Dr. Dobb's Journal or Computer Language or some such magazine?

Ron Porter
Saturday, November 08, 2003

D flat is slightly sharp of C sharp. D flat is a fifth below A flat. C sharp is a fifth above F sharp. D flat and C sharp are only 'enharmonically equivalent' in theoretically exact twelve tone equal temperament.

On Handel's harpsichord, for example, C sharp and D flat were two different keys.

Tuning Maven
Saturday, November 08, 2003

# is an octothorp, so it should be "C octothorp".

Z
Saturday, November 08, 2003

>> In musical notation, C Sharp and D Flat are the same note. <<

Not quite true.  C sharp and D flat do share the same pitch but are otherwise very different and not typically used interchangeably.  Whether this pitch is referred to as a C sharp or D flat (or B double sharp or whatever) is determined by its intervallic relationship with the other notes in the section of music that contains it.  For example, the B major scale contains a C sharp but not a D flat. 

SomeBody
Saturday, November 08, 2003

Tuning Maven, you are right.  From memory, D-Flat was a character-based windowing system from a guy that used to do tutorials on ISAM, memory buffering, stuff like that.

Damn, I wish I hadn't got divorced. That led to destruction of my archive of DDJ and other stuff :(

HeWhoMustBeConfused
Sunday, November 09, 2003

>>Not quite true.  C sharp and D flat do share the same >>pitch but


Actually....
The tempering of the major scale isn't perfect and those notes aren't exactly the same.

Not that anybody here likes being nitpicky ;)

Damian
Sunday, November 09, 2003

" those notes aren't exactly the same"

Odd, my piano has only one key for both notes. Anybody have a link to more information? I thought I knew something about music, but never heard this.

sgf
Sunday, November 09, 2003

http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/tmprment.html

anon
Sunday, November 09, 2003

Dammit, is there ANYTHING that math and physics can't screw up?

Philo

Philo
Sunday, November 09, 2003

Not wanting to sound condescending, just curious.

I assumed everyone new immediately that c# was pronounced c-sharp. Yes I did music all through highschool. I know the # is also called 'hash' (never heard bang though) but just looking at it it was obvious it was a sharp (because with the choice between c-sharp and c-hash, sharp made more sense).

Is it really non-obvious? Is the fact that # = sharp not well known?

Aussie Chick
Sunday, November 09, 2003

# is pronounced "octothorpe"

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=octothorpe

Ron
Sunday, November 09, 2003

The Unicode name of # is NUMBER SIGN (alternate: pound sign, hash, crosshatch, octothorpe).

It's not the same as ? which is MUSIC SHARP SIGN (alternate: z notation infix bag count).

I suppose if Microsoft had written it C? we'd have people claiming it was really "C Z Notation Infix Bag Count".

Nate Silva
Monday, November 10, 2003

The ? in the above is Unicode U+266F, which isn't present in this web page's windows-1252 encoding. Maybe this will work: &#x266F; or &#9839;

Nate Silva
Monday, November 10, 2003

Interestingly enough, the Windows Character Map jumps from 266B to E801

Philo

Philo
Monday, November 10, 2003

Philo: Try Arial Unicode. And Character Map doesn't display code points in numeric order so use the "Go to Unicode" box.

Nate Silva
Monday, November 10, 2003

Oh cool - thanks!

So:
Pound = #
Sharp = Pound rotated 15 degrees CCW
Sharpe = Sean Bean

?

Philo

Philo
Monday, November 10, 2003

No, pound = something else which doesn't appear on this kbd.


Monday, November 10, 2003

We all call it C hash. Mostly just to take the piss.

Mr Jack
Monday, November 10, 2003

Pound = £ (Alt+156)

Fernanda Stickpot
Monday, November 10, 2003

The tempering article was great. I've never heard of this even though I've played a lot of music.

I knew that the blues scale wasn't the same going up and down, but not major and minor.

pdq
Monday, November 10, 2003


I always liked the explaination that # was sharp because it was all pointy and looked like it might cut you if you picked it up.

Bill Tomlinson
Monday, November 10, 2003

I was listening to MSDN-TV talking about it, and on one of the episodes the guy explained that on the box the # is in the correct position (slightly raised etc), but they were unable to do this on the computer screen.

does make you wonder, someone must have liked it enough to go with it, even though it could not be produced correctly using ASCII text

Aussie Chick
Monday, November 10, 2003

If we use A=440 HZ then C#=Db because it's no logic to  use only  one fixed note ! Or G##=A like C#=Db...

Dimitrov(violinist)

latchezar_d@yahoo.com

Dimitrov L.
Sunday, April 04, 2004

If you fix one note, the rest all fall into place.  Anyway, it is much easier with Pythagoras's rule of thirds to start a new octave, then use circles of fifths and fourths from those base points to find the other notes, you will see that the sharps and flats don't line up, but who here can honestly tell the difference between 440Hz and 441Hz [I can start to tell when it gets about 4 or 5 Hz off, and I have good ears]

tonsofpcs
Friday, June 18, 2004

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