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The Language FOrmerly known as Lingo...

is now known as:

- Visual Fred
- Cola
- Ubercola
- Ubercode
- Ubersharp

Any preferences? I was thinking of "Visual Fred" - the language that is almost but not entirely unlike Visual Basic.

Bill Rayer
Saturday, October 11, 2003

My preference is for Cola is you can get away with it. I wouldn't be able to take anything called Visual Fred seriously.

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Saturday, October 11, 2003

If I use 'cola', I may still get the same background radiation from the loyal defenders of other company's trademarks: 'did you know Cola Cola is a trademark' etc.

Bill Rayer
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Cola should be safe. No risk of confusion. And theres Many brands that use the word Cola. Calling your language Pepsi Cola wouldnt work though :D

Eric DeBois
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Is there a market for this language of yours Bill?  Or this just a hobby you are persuing?


Saturday, October 11, 2003

Cola is a great name for a programming language...  I just wish I had thought of it first! 

Almost Anonymous
Saturday, October 11, 2003

The problem with "Lingo" was that there is an existing programming language with the exact same name.
"Cola" is generic for caramel-colored soda pop, and as far as I know there's nothing in the IT realm with the name.

Philo

Philo
Saturday, October 11, 2003

I prefer Visual Cola

Stephen Jones
Saturday, October 11, 2003

I second "Visual Cola"

Philo
Saturday, October 11, 2003

The "Visual" prefix will be old-fashioned in 1 or 2 years. Why using it?

FireMode
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Visual is bogus anyway. Is there *any* language in which you can *really* programm visually i.e. drag and drop icons, no text involved? If there were would you consider it a language, or using it to be programming?

Just a random rant against another buzzword......

sgf
Saturday, October 11, 2003

"Object Cola"?

What's the next big thing? Anyone got any guesses?

Philo

Philo
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Cola.NET, of course!

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Visual comes after text based. So what after Visual? Psychic!

Introducing "Psychik Cola -- the Language that Knows what you want to Code before you do! (tm)"

"Where will you go today? Psychick Cola knows the answer! (tm)"

--

So, Bill... you, er... heard from Macromedia or what?

Dennis Atkins
Saturday, October 11, 2003

And the oracle of google informs us that there is already a computer programming language called CoLa:

http://citeseer.nj.nec.com/hirsbrunner94cola.html

This could be tricky.

No psychic cola though!

Dennis Atkins
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Oh dear, and here is a second programming language (I think) called cola:

http://cvs.perl.org/cgi/cvsweb.cgi/parrot/languages/cola/

If no Cola. Maybe Whopper? Or Fries? Shake? Earthquake? Dingo? Kangaroo?

Dennis Atkins
Saturday, October 11, 2003

How about
Wide
Area
Language
    for
Multitasking
Applications in
Real
Time
?

Surely that's available?

Philo

Philo
Saturday, October 11, 2003


Don't let it get you down.    The product I'm working on was originally supposed to be called Data Analyzer.  Guess who took that name?  Our backup name was Infopath - guess who also took that name?   

Can't compete with MS
Saturday, October 11, 2003

Code Cola

Simon Lucy
Sunday, October 12, 2003

How about 'Jargon'?  Or maybe 'deep structures in the universal grammar parse tree'?

Steven Pinker
Sunday, October 12, 2003

Jargon's quite a good name but then I thought..."Jargo"!

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Sunday, October 12, 2003

sgf:  Have you seen the tools that come with mindstorm? 

You basically link together coloured blocks, some of which can take values..  It's very neat (:

Bleh
Sunday, October 12, 2003

Raylang (RAYer LANGuage): some narcissim won't hurt!

FireMode
Sunday, October 12, 2003

> Don't let it get you down.    The product I'm working on was originally supposed to be called Data Analyzer.  Guess who took that name? <

Actually, it's highly unlikely that any company (even Microsoft) could trademark a name as generic as "Data Analyzer." 

Trademark law gives greater protection to names that are particularly unique (like "Coca Cola" or "Kodak"), and little or no protection to what are termed "generic" names.  For example, you can't trademark "Peanut Butter" brand peanut butter.  (Although "Peanut Butter" might qualify as highly original for something else, like a search engine.)

What does a program called Data Analyzer do?  It analyzes data.  This is the definition of a generic trademark, so a single company can't monopolize the name.  However, it's always a better idea to choose a unique name that makes your product stand out -- "Yahoo" and "Google" are great examples.

Robert Jacobson
Monday, October 13, 2003

How about calling it "11 - the language that is one louder"

Matthew Lock
Monday, October 13, 2003

Not "Code Cola", how about "Coda Cola" ?

Sounds suspiciously similar to a drink, but different enough to be useful perhaps.

Steve Jones (UK)
Monday, October 13, 2003

"Actually, it's highly unlikely that any company (even Microsoft) could trademark a name as generic as "Data Analyzer."

What about Word? Or Windows? Or Project? They're pretty generic names.

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Monday, October 13, 2003

>> What about Word? Or Windows? Or Project?

The names are "Microsoft Word", "Microsoft Windows", and "Microsoft Project."

MS lost the suit against Lindows - part of the reason was that "Windows" was too generic to protect.

However, just like the confusion with Lingo, it would probably be a bad marketing move to name a product "MySoft Word".

RocketJeff
Monday, October 13, 2003

>>Actually, it's highly unlikely that any company (even Microsoft) could trademark a name as generic as "Data Analyzer."

I think the whole point is that trademark is irrelevant  to this issue.    I doubt anyone would take seriously a company that brought out a product  similar in function and with the same name as a Microsoft product.   

Can't compete with MS
Monday, October 13, 2003

Perhaps you should call it the 'Constrained Objects Language,'  Cola just being an anacronym.

Ged Byrne
Monday, October 13, 2003

> What about Word? Or Windows? Or Project? They're pretty generic names. <

Notice how it's always "Microsoft Word," "Microsoft Windows," and "Microsoft Project."  Microsoft can trademark the combined names, since "Microsoft" is a distinct trademark.

As for whether Word, Windows or Project could be trademarked individually, it's a grey area.  (That's the subject of the Lindows trademark suit -- is the name "Windows" sufficiently strong and distinct to be a valid trademark, so that the use of "Lindows" is an infringement?)  The name "Word" is slightly more unique for a word processor than "Word Processor," but not much.

However, Can't Compete is right that it's never a smart business decision to choose a name that's similar to a competing Microsoft product, even if doing so is permissible under trademark law. 

Robert Jacobson
Monday, October 13, 2003

Almost Anonymous - it was Ged Byrne who thought of Cola, not me. I think it is a good name, but I think I'll get the same noise level I get with Lingo.

sgf - Visual Cola is OK too. Your comment about visual programming is spot on. There was an area of academic research called visual languages which are what you said. The emergenge of VB, VC etc snowed this under, and the newsroup comp.lang.visual died from irrelevant VB questions.

Object Cola is OK and I like Cola coder (or coder cola). But I think that's too close to coca cola.

Dennis Atkins - "heard from Macromedia or what?" Yep the black helicopters are outside as I type. No, seriously I haven't. Without rehashing the trademark discussions in earlier threads, the reason I'm considering changing the name is not from any legal threat, but because of people's perception of a potential legal threat.

Also there are Colas already, as you found. There's something for the Mac, too.

Philo - I've never been to the USA but I understand WALMART is the name of a small chain of grocery stores :)

Robert Jacobson - you have a good understanding of trademark law. As said, that's why it's 'Microsoft Word', 'Visual Basic', not just Word or Basic. But there is provision in trademark law for a generic name to be registerable if it is very widely known - thus I think Microsoft will win over Lindows (they only lost the first round). I think Microsoft can successfully argue that Windows is so widely known as to be a registerable trademark, in spite of prior use and genericity.

That leaves:

- Visual Cola
- Ubercola
- Ubercode
- Ubersharp
- Uber basic

Bill Rayer
Monday, October 13, 2003

C0la (it's a zero, hehehe)
coLA (tribute to Los Angeles)
Coola
Cool.A, Cool.B, etc.
A-Cool (Algorithmic Cool Language)
Soda

(Ok, I know: any language with "cool" in its name is *really* not cool)

Ross
Monday, October 13, 2003

Ross - similar spellings don't get round trademark law. Eg if Lingo isn't allowed, Lyngoe wouldn't be either. Also I agree with you on languages with 'cool' in their name being uncool. I like Ubersharp or Uberbasic now (those should be U's with two dots, like Umlauts).

How about wikkidware?

I think I'll just change the install script to include a question 'what do you want to call this product?' Over the last few weeks, I've spent more time replacing strings such as "Lingo" by#defines than I've spent on productive coding.

Bill Rayer
Monday, October 13, 2003

I think double barreled names are destined to fail.  Visual Basic only survived as VB.

How about 'über'?

It means 'above,' doesn't it?  Nice sentiment.

Ged Byrne
Monday, October 13, 2003

That's right, 'uber' means 'above' and it should use the umlaut (u with two dots above). My keyboard doesn't have suck a key, I wonder if &uuml; will work? How did you type in the umlaut?

Aha - I found one in Word and cut and paste it in! This should say Übercode...

Bill Rayer
Monday, October 13, 2003

So... &uuml; didn't work and Übercode did.

Bill Rayer
Monday, October 13, 2003

Do not use 'Uber' or 'über' as is has a very bad connotation in countries and with people that lived under Nazi-occupation. It resembles too much the Nazi-terminology that I which not to repeat here.

I like all the cool cola ideas, though....

programming language junkie
Monday, October 13, 2003

C# used to be called "COOL", I think. I'm glad it changed, as going into a boardroom and recommending it would have been difficult.

Steve Jones (UK)
Tuesday, October 14, 2003

Cola definately seems to have the most appeal.

I think the solution to trademark worrie is simple.  Having looked at the definition of Cola at http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=cola , I read:

: a carbonated soft drink colored usually with caramel and flavored usually with extracts from kola nuts

Kola - phonetically the same and not trademarks to worry about.  Plus, people who use it can be referred to as kola nuts.

Does anybody know if a comma, colon or semi colon should be used when starting a sentence with plus?

Ged Byrne
Tuesday, October 14, 2003


"Do not use 'Uber' or 'über' as is has a very bad connotation in countries and with people that lived under Nazi-occupation. It resembles too much the Nazi-terminology that I which not to repeat here."

I did wonder about that point. But:

- this language specifically comes from the UK, not Germany.

- Although you can't see it in Arial font, I was going to do the umlaut to make it look like a smiley.

- We're talking about 60 year old history now. I'm very aware of European history but you can't live in the past.

- I've occasionally seen the word 'uber' used in the UK press meaning 'very' or 'extremely'. There's some evidence it's becoming more widely used.

Maybe I'll run with 3 names (Cola, Lingo, Ubercode) and see which is most popular.

Bill Rayer
Tuesday, October 14, 2003

Your original choice of "Lingo" is a synonym or slang term for "language". How about a different version of the word "language" - such as "argot"? However, the word "argot" has negative connotations: "Argot is the French word for slang. When used in English, it refers primarily to slang used by various groups, including but not limited to thieves and other criminals, to prevent outsiders from understanding their conversations."; although the part about preventing outsiders (non-programmers) from understanding may be appropriate!

Philip Dickerson
Tuesday, October 14, 2003

Ini the tradition of Wiki, perhaps you could look to Hawaii for inspiraction

http://www.hawaiian-language.com/Hawaiian/Words/

Hele - go
Hana - Work / Make
Kala - Release
Kawa - Leaping Place
Kula - Gold / School
Lele - To leap / fly
Luana - Relax / enjoy
nani - Beautiful / cute
uku - Bonus / prize

Ged Byrne
Tuesday, October 14, 2003

I don't like the "uber" prefix. How about Nano?

John Topley (www.johntopley.com)
Wednesday, October 15, 2003

I'll check out the Hawaiian names. That's an interesting list you found there!

Nano - nanoware? not sure.

Maybe I should choose a symbol, like the Artist who has no name. After all there are over 65,000 symbols in Unicode...

Bill Rayer
Wednesday, October 15, 2003

If You choose a symbol, let's it be an Aleph, 1st letter of hebrew language. Very Symbolic. Beginning of programming.

__Lucky
Friday, May 14, 2004

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