Fog Creek Software
Discussion Board




My first bug come feature

Woohoo.

I am feeling like I have reached some pinnacle of success right now (or perhaps lack of).

I just found a bug (one of many as I have been testing) in one the macros I have been creating for work.
But as I looked at it, it is quite handy (a particular field retains the previous entry, since the entires are almost always the same this is kind of good).

So I have a bug, am too lazy to remove it, upon looking closely decided 'um yes, could call that a feature', and now I don't have to fix the bug....marvellous system....

Aussie Chick
Wednesday, October 01, 2003

<g> I betcha it only happens in certain specific circumstances.  Once your app is released it will stop working, prompting user bug reports about the 'broken feature'.
On closer examination you will realise that keeping the feature, and fixing it so it will work under all circumstances will require that your GUI/backend interface be slightly redesigned....on closer examination again (and after 4 hours spent working on the redesign) you will discover that the feature depends on a quirk of the operating system under specific edge conditions and that a _major_ redesign will be required to make it work properly.

You will suggest taking it out again to your client/project manager (whichever is appropriate to your employment situation) but they will point out how incredibly useful it is to the data entry people.

You will be forced to perform the redesign, this will take anywhere between 1 and 3 weeks depending on the strength of solar flares from the sun during that period.

The further delay on this project will create problems and wil finally result in your position being terminated as a cost saving exercise.

The loss of your very real talent and ability in this crucial project will ultimately cause the company you are working for to go under.

<g> _or_ you could fix the bug as it now stands, and enter it as a feature suggestion in the bugbase, to be added later when it can be scheduled in.

FullNameRequired
Thursday, October 02, 2003

Some people might call that a "glass is half empty" attitude FullName :)

Damian
Thursday, October 02, 2003

:) Only those who have been programming for less than 2 years.

FullNameRequired
Thursday, October 02, 2003

That includes me.

This set of macros is the culmination of much hard word. Mostly in the last few weeks, though I created the first one 12 months ago, saved the firm thousands of dollars each year, and I actually got raked over the coals for daring to write it without getting permission from the powers that be, mind you it was done in my spare time, and I still have receive no thanks for it. (I have been working for an accounting firm doing bookwork and fixing there computers while going thoruhg uni)

Still I persisted, have a lot more leeway now, and the macro suite is ready to roll out.

Tomorrow, I take my presentation to one of the powers that be and try to convince her that it worthwhile, that any time I spend initially creating a macro for each template will be recouped in increased productivity for other membes of the firm......

Aussie Chick
Thursday, October 02, 2003

"and I actually got raked over the coals for daring to write it without getting permission from the powers that be, mind you it was done in my spare time, and I still have receive no thanks for it."

<sigh> and I have to interview 300 applicatants to find just one who is capable of having a thought without asking permission first.

honestly, someone with your kind of initiative and intelligence is worth their weight in gold in my experience. 

"Tomorrow, I take my presentation to one of the powers that be and try to convince her that it worthwhile,"

congratulations (and my sincere admiration) on getting this far, and good luck with the presentation.

let us know how it goes :)

FullNameRequired
Thursday, October 02, 2003

I remember an interview at an accounting firm back in 99.  This firm had been seriously burnt by the creation of 1000s of Macros created by individuals, mainly in Excel.

When Y2K autiting came along they discovered all of these macros that people depended upon to do their job, but nobody understood how they worked.

The original authors had mainly moved own, and the generations that followed just knew how to use the Macro, they did not know how to do things the long way round.

Similar experiences may be fresh in the mind of the powers that be, so make sure you address them.

Make sure you have the answers to questions like:
Who will look after the Macro when you have moved on?
How will the Macros adapt to change?
Are the Macros Microsoft dependant?  (With licensing fees being an issue a lot of companies are considering this an important issue)
How will the IT department be able to support you Macros?

I think you should be prepared for this type of question when you give your presentation.

Ged Byrne
Thursday, October 02, 2003

FWIW, it's properly "My first bug cum feature"

Of course, that's why you almost never see it in print. :-)

Philo

Philo
Thursday, October 02, 2003

Take no notice of such scabrous suggestions, anyhow a bug never cums alone but always, as buses, in threes.

Its a bugette, a kind of portmanteau bug and featurette.

Simon Lucy
Thursday, October 02, 2003

"Take no notice of such scabrous suggestions"

Sounds like we've got a budding Pelham Grenville Wodehouse on our hands. ;)

Exception guy
Thursday, October 02, 2003

><sigh> and I have to interview 300 applicatants to find >just one who is capable of having a thought without >asking permission first.

Let me know when you are hiring next and I will send my resume along.

Ged Byrne:
Thanks for the pointers, I had addressed some of the issues. eg maintaining a the templates in their original format (and always keeping them uptodate) so that if the macro collection becomes redundant for any reason, be it an hour, or for good, users can switch back. I am the IT department, and teaching someone VBA may be out of the question, however I have endeavoured to keep the code extremely easy to understand, and extremely uniform across all macros for that very reason.
I am going to look at the other points, thanks.

Aussie Chick
Thursday, October 02, 2003

>><sigh> and I have to interview 300 applicatants to find >just one who is capable of having a thought without >asking permission first.

>Let me know when you are hiring next and I will send my resume along.

Likewise.  ;>

Sam Livingston-Gray
Thursday, October 02, 2003

<g> new zealand is a long way to come for a job interview...

FullNameRequired
Thursday, October 02, 2003

"My first bug cum feature"

Is that showing on the new XXX-rated Discovery Channel?

HeWhoMustBeConfused
Thursday, October 02, 2003

This provides evidence that turf wars (i.e. "You aren't supposed to do that, we've got engineers to do that") are harmful.

Flamebait Sr.
Thursday, October 02, 2003

300 applicants in NZ?

That'd be the whole IT workforce, wouldn't it?


Thursday, October 02, 2003

fullnamerequired:
You are in NZ?

I did not realise

Aussie Chick
Thursday, October 02, 2003

Just curious what your QA department thinks of your new 'feature'?  If you have a QA department...

Jen
Friday, October 03, 2003

No QA department.

This is only a small accounting firm (30 staff).

Aussie Chick
Sunday, October 05, 2003

Aussie Chick:  30 staff and you're still being flamed for doing things that fall outside your narrow job description?  Scary.  I usually only see that in much larger organizations.  (Then again, they are accountants...)

FullNameRequired:  It may be a long way to come for an interview, but the job market here in Oregon is pretty awful.  Telecommuting, perhaps?  ;>

Sam Livingston-Gray
Sunday, October 05, 2003

*  Recent Topics

*  Fog Creek Home