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Internet Tax is here

Live in New York?
Bought something on the internet?

Send the Sales Tax to http://www.nystax.gov/pit/Use_tax.htm

This is the easy way, without boiling the ocean.

The next step, force online retailers to give out details about all sales made to New York State.

New Yorker
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

Use tax has been around in most states for years before the Internet became a force in commerce.

Mitch & Murray (from downtown)
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

Yep, as long as I'd been filing taxes in both Michigan and Massachusetts, I saw it on the forms. I don't think I've seen it on the forms in Colorado (but I have an accountant do them now).

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

Its been on the NC Income tax for a couple of years.  Not limited to the internet though, any out of state purchase made without paying some type of sales tax.


-apw

"Intaxication: Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize it was your money to start with. "

apw
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

I’ve been charged internet sales tax in NJ (6,5% if I remember well) for some time now, directly at source.

coresi
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

"Intaxication: Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize it was your money to start with. "

lol, no.. it's their money... they printed it, and gracefully gave it to you, but naturally they want it back.. and they get it, piece at a time :)
if you really want to rub them up the wrong way, send it out of the country :)

matt
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

No, it's my money. I earned it, I paid it to them, and now they're giving it back to me.

But maybe in a larger sense it is "their" money. We (citizens) are consuming vastly more government services each year than we pay for in taxes. So you're right in the sense that: You can say it's "your" car as long as you keep making the payments. Once you stop making the payments, you'll find it never really was "your" car.

Nate Silva
Tuesday, January 13, 2004

The thing with the car example is that you are borrowing money from a bank to pay someone for the car.  Once you have satisfied the agreement with the bank, its your car.
With tax returns you state how much you made and how much you've paid in taxes.  If its to much; you get a refund.  Not enough; you have to pay more.  It's your money (assuming you earned it).

People are generally oblivious to how much taxes they pay.  I bet if you asked someone how much taxes they paid last year a majority would say.  "I got a refund last year" or "I had to pay $300 bucks".  People are clueless.

apw
Wednesday, January 14, 2004

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