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Sun really loves Linux

Jonathan Schwartz, Sun's executive vice president for software: "Also, let me really clear about our Linux strategy. We don't have one. We don't at all. We do not believe that Linux plays a role on the server. Period. "

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,4149,1274614,00.asp

Just me (Sir to you)
Monday, September 22, 2003


From the article:
"We, on the other hand, have a safe, compelling and 
affordable product called Solaris that runs on Intel,
Opteron and SPARC. "

Solaris runs on SPARCs when you think about it. I have never ever seen a Solaris production environment on anything other than SPARC.

Solaris x86 was in bad shape when I tried it, and Linux did beat it hands down in terms of hardware support and device drivers.

Patrik
Monday, September 22, 2003

What would you expect SUN to say about their major competitor? 

Linux's major impact is on the server market.  MS has the desktop market to handle some of the impact, but SUN is a server only company.  Every Linux sale is a loss for them.

MSHack
Monday, September 22, 2003

Linux made it this far without Sun.
Sun on the other hand suddenly felt they had to buy Cobalt, release StarOffice code under an Open Source license, and now this "Java Enterprise System" and "Java Desktop" thing. Sun seem to have a lot more strategies involving Linux than the article reflects.

Bottom line: Sun has to adjust its existence to Linux, not vice versa! You fell for some cheap sales talk, Sir!

Martin A. Boegelund
Monday, September 22, 2003

Sun's in a huge load of trouble.  Java was the one thing that could have saved their business and they blew it big time.  They should own the Java server software market and they don't.  They lost. 

christopher baus
Monday, September 22, 2003

Sun has mainly to adjust to the popularity of Unix on x86, which tears the traditional Unix pricepoints down even more than Windows did, because of the shorter migration path.
Sun is a hardware business. Unfortunately they can not differentiate themselves enough from Intel/AMD in most segments to warrant the price diference they need to keep their current business structure. I do not know if reinventing themselves as a software shop will work. They do not have a strong reputation in that area, and it feels more like a half harted hail Mary than a real solid recovery plan.

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

Maybe Sun will acquire Apple. Or BEA Systems.

Scott M.
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

... and do what?

Rick Childress
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

>... and do what? <

and, uh, return to their winning ways? Yeah, that's it, that's the ticket! :-P

Scott M.
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

BEA _might_ make sense for them but I don't see what Apple could bring to the table.

Rick Childress
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

Yeah, getting Apple probably wouldn't do anything for them. It's not like Sun is a software company that could create a lot of apps for the Mac.

Getting BEA would give them a market leader in J2EE app servers, since their own iPlanet is at best an 'also-ran'.

Linux, IBM and others are hammerin' away at Sun and Sun gives away Java, so what's the business model?

Scott M.
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

"What's the business model?" Licensing J2ME for wireless devices??

Scott M.
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

Sun is doing a very fpoor job of licensing J2ME for anything.  We get a better VM for better terms from 3rd party suppliers.  Sun wanted a buhzillion dollars up front, and outrageous per user licensing.  3rd party suppliers were much more friendly with their terms and pricing.  Also, the 3rd party VM's perform much better -at least when benchmarked against J2SE or ME.

standardized anon
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

> Sun gives away Java, so what's the business model?

This was on a previous thread.

The business model was not to get killed by Microsoft, and in that respect I think it did quite well, at least so far.

Portabella
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

Sun's business model:

1) Write java in such a way that it runs best on Solaris.

2) Convince developers to use Java for everything.

3) Java is a CPU hog, so customers will buy more and bigger Sun servers to run their Java server-side apps.

4) J2ME apps won't run on Solaris, but they'll probably need to talk to a server, which (in Sun's grand vision) will naturally be running Solaris.

Of course, Intel, Linux, and IBM's JVM kinda put a kink in Sun's profit plans.

Richard Ponton
Tuesday, September 23, 2003

I still think sun should have been bea.  I was stupid to let another company write the software for their own platform.

christopher baus
Wednesday, September 24, 2003

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