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Borlands C++ builder X



Seeing as Borland are now going for the cross platform C++ market, is there any point in using Java?

Mike Grace
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

that doesn't change as much as you might think.  There have been x-plat c++ potions for a while now, wxWindows, qt trolltech, powerplant, cplat  <g> the list goes on and on.

Be interesting to see whether Borlands does a better job than any of those.

Really java has, IMO, established a decent niche for itself and is very likely to remain there for a good while.

FullNameRequired
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

wow, did anyone else realise that if you swapped the letters of 'options' around you get 'potions'?  takes me back to my younger days as a 6th level warrior with a sword of small furry animals...

FullNameRequired
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

Sorry, I meant to add for "desktop apps".

Mike Grace
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

"Sorry, I meant to add for "desktop apps"."

ahh...<g> that does make the question rather more interesting IMO.

although never having used java for desktop apps im definitely not able to answer it.
Im very interested in whether any java programmers have an opinion?  are there any specific advantages that java has over c++ for x-plat desktop applications?
my feeling has been that the main usage of java has been shifting to web apps etc, is that grossly unfair?

FullNameRequired
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

<quote>
Seeing as Borland are now going for the cross platform C++ market, is there any point in using Java?
</quote>

Considering the fact that the new C++BuilderX GUI is written in Java, I think there is.

jan Derk
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

Most people don't bother building cross-platform GUIs.

After all, if it's for internal use you can bet there's only windows to deal with. And for shrink-wrapped apps, why bother with anything other than windows?

And, the biggest problem, all the cross-platform GUI toolkits are, well, ugly (Java included).


Wednesday, September 17, 2003

>> Most people don't bother building cross-platform GUIs

Except for those of use who do

>> if it's for internal use you can bet there's only windows to deal with

..and you would lose that bet in my company.

>>...GUI toolkits are, well, ugly (Java included)

It can be difficult to make a Java GUI work and look _exactly_ like a native app, but they certainly don't have to look "ugly".

Some examples:

http://www.intellij.com/images/screenshots/advancedEditor.gif
http://www.jgoodies.com/freeware/jdiskreport/images/jdiskreport_med.jpg
http://www.jgoodies.com/freeware/metamorphosis/images/elegantui.gif
http://java.sun.com/products/jfc/tsc/sightings/S14/JDBInsight/transactionTableGraph.jpg

Andrew Reid
Wednesday, September 17, 2003

FullNameRequired, regarding your enumeration of existing cross-platform C++ toolkits: it is my understanding that Borland doesn't introduce a new one.

The IDE is written in Java, but all other components can be interchanged. Different toolkits can be used, the default toolkit seems to be wxWindows (I wonder why they don't use CLX?), you can use different compilers, different debuggers even.

Roel Schroeven
Thursday, September 18, 2003

" it is my understanding that Borland doesn't introduce a new one."

ahh...<g> thats why I try and avoid making assumptions, I almost always get them wrong..

so the borland thing is an IDE with plugins?  pretty cool.

"the default toolkit seems to be wxWindows"

:)  good choice, I _like_ wxWindows.

Interesting that they choose to use java for it, really makes the whole question of java for desktops rather redundant...

<g> assuming its any good of course...

FullNameRequired
Thursday, September 18, 2003

More information on the new Borland product can be found in the press release at http://www.borland.com/news/press_releases/2003/09_15_03_borland_lanches_cbx_estudio_cpp.html and a demo with screenshots at http://www.borland.com/cbuilderx/tour/View_C++BuilderX%20Turbo%20Demo.htm .

Roel Schroeven
Thursday, September 18, 2003

http://wxwindows.org/borland01.htm explicitly says that Borland's C++BuilderX adopted wxWindows as its C++ framework.

Roel Schroeven
Thursday, September 18, 2003

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