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Excel crashes on saving template

I've been saving my Excel template many times till now for the last two days into a file called Copiers1.xlt. Now, it has started giving me a GPF and starts crashing Excel when I save it under the same name. If I save it under a different name, it still does not save saying "Document not saved." No help button is available on the message box. What could be causing this? Please help me as I have been stuck for the last 4 hours with this and have changed several machines and re-installed Excel also but nothing seems to have changed.

What this template file is supposed to do is, pick up the path of an Access database from the registry, read from the table in an Access database and display the data in a tabular form in the spreadsheet. It allows to the user to edit existing data displayed in the template file, add more rows in the file and then click a menu item called "Save to database" (this is also added by the VBA code I am writing in the template file) to filter invalid data by validating it against a set of rules and then save all the rows to the same table in the same Access database. Finally all, this data travels over Winsock to a server located in the head office of my client for whom I am developing this application. The head office computer then issues a read receipt for the data it has received.

The Excel module had 25 odd modules, which includes 18-20 class modules and five odd Standard modules. It also includes the standard object modules like the modules for each sheet and one for the Workbook.

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Friday, September 05, 2003

VERY VERY typical office experience.  Welcome to the club.

Mike
Friday, September 05, 2003

I had to abandon that file and create a new one, and insert all those modules all over again to get back on track.

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Saturday, September 06, 2003

I agree with Mike. I find it pretty common in Word for the file to get in a state where it's ruined and I have to start over again. Especially if you do something really unusual like create a document with more than 100 pages or *god help you) try to produce a document with cross references and an index. All in the nature of the anti-productivity suites. If you want to have an even worse time loosing your data, try OpenOffice.

Tony Chang
Saturday, September 06, 2003

[ If you want to have an even worse time loosing your data, try OpenOffice.]

Except that the native OpenOffice format is compressed XML, so you can always try fixing any problems manually.

MugsGame
Sunday, September 07, 2003

MugsGame,

<quote>
Except that the native OpenOffice format is compressed XML, so you can always try fixing any problems manually.
</quote>

Which no doubt will be very helpful to the original poster, who is using VBA.

Seeya

Matthew
Sunday, September 07, 2003

"Which no doubt will be very helpful to the original poster, who is using VBA."

Well it won't help him.  It might help others if they know their is a product that doesn't lock your data up in some proprietary format and then fornicate it up.

In office I've found the most likely to become corrupt are the files that are saved as a regular document and reused and reused as a template.  Probably due to all the revision tracking info that gets recorded and probably gets out of sync with what the document actually contains. 

When I make powerpoint docs, I save EVERY slide.

Mike
Monday, September 08, 2003

Mike's rule of office.

The probability of your document being corrupt is directly proportional to its importance, the time you've spent on it and the amount of formatting.

Mike
Monday, September 08, 2003

Mike you've forgotten the fourth factor: nearness to the deadline.

Stephen Jones
Monday, September 08, 2003

So very true, so very true, Mike and Steve.

Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Monday, September 08, 2003

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