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What happened to Windows debug kernel?

Does anyone remember, in the distant Windows 3.x days there was a debug kernel, and you could switch between the normal and debug kernels using n2d.bat and d2n.bat?

Is this still around? It was really useful for API level programming since it wrote warnings about invalid parameters, un-freed handles etc to the debug monitor.

Also it was fun running commercial software and looking at all the warnings it came up with!

Bill Rayer
Friday, September 05, 2003

I think that it's been replaced by the 'checked' build.  See http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/ddtools/hh/ddtools/checked_6dir.asp for details.

r1ch
Friday, September 05, 2003

I don't think the checked builds are very helpful (except for debugging device drivers).

I used to work on Microsoft's NT test team. I would occasionally run stress tests on the checked builds. The NT kernel assert statements by default just print a debug trace; they do not break into the remote debugger. When running tests, you would see HUNDREDS of assertion failure debug traces fly across the screen. These were "bugs" but no one cared to fix them. IE was an especially voluminous source of assertion failures.

runtime
Friday, September 05, 2003

The "debug" kernel was obsoleted by BoundsChecker. Share and enjoy! :-D

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Friday, September 05, 2003

"When running tests, you would see HUNDREDS of assertion failure debug traces fly across the screen. These were "bugs" but no one cared to fix them. IE was an especially voluminous source of assertion failures. "

I used to fix them, every single one of them.

Bill Rayer
Saturday, September 06, 2003

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