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home computers configuration

Q for anyone who has more than 1 PC at home -- what is your configuration? do you use 1 (or more) pc as server? do you use wireless networking to connect those pcs? do you use multiple OS?

eddy
Sunday, August 31, 2003

Two work computers. Three home computers. One printer shared with a WinXP system for all to use. I use a router/wireless hub and a wireless repeater for the other side of the house. I live in nowheresville, so I have the wireless moderately locked down. Also the firewall in the router is a "can't live without" feature.

m
Sunday, August 31, 2003

Our new house has CAT-5 from every room into a first floor wiring cabinet.  A cable modem and netgear MR814 wireless access point hook everything together.  The access point does firewall, NAT and filtering.  My laptop connects via wireless.

duckling
Sunday, August 31, 2003

ISP feeds into an 802.11g Access Point and Router. One PC runs W2K3 as a server. One desktop is a gaming/dev machine, one laptop is strictly dev on "on the road" stuff (so it runs e-mail, RSS, etc.). Wife has a headless Linux PC and a Windows XP machine for personal uses (occasional at-home work, but not much).

There's a wireless bridge between the router and the living room, where an Xbox, a PS2, and an Audiotron get access to the 'net and the server.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Monday, September 01, 2003

Oh, should mention that the server runs an ATA RAID 1 for ripped music and data, and the desktop machine runs a Serial ATA RAID 1 for local data.

Brad Wilson (dotnetguy.techieswithcats.com)
Monday, September 01, 2003

Public facing GNU/Linux server running as router with permanent connection to ISP. Runs mail server, public web server and hosts CVS repositories shared with external developers.

Public facing Win32 server running FogBUGZ and nothing else.

Private GNU/Linux server running Samba for file server plus hosting all Unix development accounts.

2x developer workstations.

HP4MV with HP JetDirect network connection.

HP450C A1 color plotter.

Cannon S520 A4 inket color printer.

All connected via Cat5 switched 100MBit switch.

Public facing Linux server has 2 NICS and acts as router between internal non-routable network and public network.

Andrew Lighten
Monday, September 01, 2003

100baset comes into my flat from the housing association who have their own mini isp.  The link between the buildings is also 100baset, but I suspect a few flats are sucking up a lot of bandwidth with p2ps; and there is definitely an early evening congestion too as people get home from work etc.  But it sure beats cable etc!

Inside the flat the cable goes straight into a cheapo natting switch, which is all the security I feel I need.  Behind that, a couple of boxes, mostly win2k and linux dual-boots.

Why do I feel proud of this setup?  Because it's _mine_.... argggh

i like i
Monday, September 01, 2003

Linux PC connected to ADSL modem.  Does NAT and firewalling for all internal machines on the network.  Provides DNS (all internal machines have names), database (MySQL), CVS repositories, and web server.

Home/Work PC running Windows XP Professional connected to LAN via 100Mbit CAT-5 to firewall.  Runs Apache/PHP for local development.

Girlfriends PC running Windows XP Professional.  Connected to LAN via CAT-5.

Modified i-Opener network PC running Windows 98 connected via CAT-5 in the bar.  This is the "bar computer" and usually is just used to connect to http://www.webtender.com

Fujitsu P2000 Subnotebook computer running Windows XP home (came with it).  Connected via 802.11b.

Almost Anonymous
Monday, September 01, 2003

FreeBSD on both the email/WWW/domain server and my main development workstation.

Win98 on the box I'm typing at.  VNC to get combined FreeBSD/Windows display.  (I'd rather not, but clients like to send me Word documents, and I haven't been able to get OpenOffice to work on FreeBSD.)

A Linux box for those things that require it (like testing applications linked with FlexLM, because Macrovision thinks FreeBSD is still at the 3.x stage.)

Everything hooked up to a LinkSys DSL router/firewall and 2.2 Mbps DSL connection.

David Jones
Monday, September 01, 2003

Two laptops -- one with linux for playing with(almost 400 days uptime!) and another with Windows XP for development, et al.

Mickey Petersen
Monday, September 01, 2003

1 dual Pentium box  (Windows / Linux )
1 work laptop          (Windows )
1 Sun Ultra 5            ( Solaris )

All connected to a NATing 100Mbit switch with a 10Mbit
external internet connection.

Patrik
Monday, September 01, 2003

2 PCs, the one connected to 1.3Mbps DSL offers network address translation. Usually I give them two personalities. So both could keep busy doing something. One of them could be playing a DVD while the other burns cd backups. One could download game demos and the other for work. Etc Etc.

Li-fan Chen
Monday, September 01, 2003

I tried making one of PCs into a media center but haven't had much success. The multimedia software from ATI is sometimes servicible, but never a joy to use.

Li-fan Chen
Monday, September 01, 2003

DSL modem
    |
    |
D-Link DI-704
    |
    |
    +--- My workstation
    |      PIII/600, 1GB, 21" CRT
    |      Win 2k sp 2
    |          X11R6 (Cygwin)
    |          Terminal Services Client
    |
    +--- My laptop
    |      Dell Inspirion (PIII/800, 256MB), 15" LCD
    |      Linux (SuSE)
    |          TightVNC
    |          VMWare
    |              Win 2k sp 2
    |                  Terminal Services Client
    |
    +--- Wife's workstation
    |      Pentium/200, 256MB,  15" CRT
    |      WinNT 4 sp 6 (Enterprise)
    |          IIS 4.0
    |          MS SQL Server 7
    |      Linux (Red Hat)
    |
    +---  3Com 8-port 10/100 hub
                |
                +--- Server
                |      PIII/600, 1GB, "headless"
                |      Linux (SuSE)
                |          Apache + ModPerl
                |          VMWare
                |              Win 2k sp 2
                |                  IIS 5.0
                |              Win 2k sp 2
                |                  MS SQL Server 2k
                |
                +--- Retired workstation (game machine)
                |      Pentium/166, 64MB, 15" CRT
                |      Win95 OSR2
                |      Linux (Red Hat)
                |
                +--- Retired workstation
                      486dx2/66, 16MB, "headless"
                      Linux (do it yourself)

Anonymous Coward
Monday, September 01, 2003

Some very nice wiring and sophisticated set ups.  I'm wondering if the more modest among us are not inclined to share?

Quick question:  how many who have CAT-5 wiring,
1. The house/flat camre wired that way.
2. Wired it after construction - did it yourself or hired contractor?
3. Run wires exterior to walls: on floor, stapled to walls, etc.

duckling
Monday, September 01, 2003

wow, JoS sure ought to form a SETI team or something!  *grin*

i like i
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

In university me and my three roomies rented a house and had:

Cable and DSL modems (yes, we had both) to headless discless 486 Linux dedicated router. 

Downstairs hub had:
roomie 1's computer (Athalon 750)
Dual P166 file server with a whopping 40G file space ;)
AMD K62 350 Linux dev box
PIII 550 Media Computer (Matrox G450 dual head card for TVout) in living room. 

Upstairs hub had:
roomie 2's computer (Athalon XP 1600+)
roomie 3's computer (Athalon XP 1600+)
my Duron 1G deaktop
my P600 laptop

The house was 110 years old so it wasn't originally wired for Cat5.  Actually, indoor plumbing was not original but it was installed long before we got there.  We also didn't pay for the Cat5 cable.  I scavenged three 100' lengths from the dumpster when they were rewiring one of the labs.  We did have to pay for cable ends.  I tried to keep it out of sight as best as I could, but it was basically just run along baseboards and through any available holes. 

Considering how beat up that cable was and how many places it was run next to power cables and the iron pipes for the heating system, I'm amazed at how well it worked. 

We didn't pay for any of the NICs.  At the time, the Cable ISP gave you a free one when you subscribed and we had subscribed so many times we had enough to go around. 

D
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

I did my own cat-5 wiring in my parents' house and my old apartment.  In both cases, the actual wiring was a piece of cake once we had finally decided on exactly where we wanted each computer.

Kevin
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

To all you running these mini data centers in the home: What are you paying for electricity? At 12 Eurocents per kwh having a stack of these things running 24x7 adds a nice premium to the monthly electricity bill I imagine.

Just me (Sir to you)
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

DIY fission generators.

d00d
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

My apartment building had broadband installed; so every apartment got a ethernet drop installed.

From there its RJ45 cable installed by me, stapled cable along the walls, along the floor. This ends up in a 5 port 100Mbit switch that provides NAT and firewalling.

I couldnt afford wireless :-)

Patrik
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

Just me (Sir to you) --> What are you paying for electricity?

Computers don't take that much juice under normal use.  Especially not a 486 with no hardware except a few NICs and a load average of 0.01.  We didn't use them for two thirds of the day because we were at class or sleeping so the monitors get turned off and the computers go into power saving mode.  We paid about $10 more per month than the family that lived in the house before us.  (I don't remember what the rate was, but it was less than yours.)

D
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

OpenBSD firewall which is invariably the least capable computer in the house.  Desktop and 2 laptops on the other side.  Desktop uses wired ethernet, laptops use wireless.  Working on setting up some more capable machines to play with Linux for home projects.

Advantage to OpenBSD is that pf (OpenBSD's NAT/routing/etc software) rules.  They added traffic shaping to it lately.  I can also do things that I wouldn't be able to otherwise, like assigning multiple IP addresses to the firewall and routing those through to specific machines, for greater VNC ease.

And, OpenBSD's easy to make secure.  By default, it's fully locked down, so there's no scramble to turn off servers before the script kiddies find it.

Flamebait sr.
Tuesday, September 02, 2003

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